Masahiro Motoki

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Masahiro Motoki
BornMotoki Masahiro (本木雅弘)
(1965-12-21) 21 December 1965 (age 48)
Okegawa, Japan
Years active1982 - present
Spouse(s)Yayako Uchida (1995-)
AwardsAsian Film Award for Best Actor
2009 Departures
Japanese Academy Award for Best Newcomer
1990 226
Japanese Academy Award for Best Actor
1993 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
2009 Departures
Blue Ribbon Award for Best Actor
1993 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
2009 Departures
Hochi Film Award for Best Actor
1992 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
Japanese Professional Movie Award for Best Actor
1992 Bang!
Kinema Junpo Award for Best Actor
2009 Departures
Mainichi Film Concours for Best Actor
1999 The Bird People in China
Nikkan Sports Film Award for Best Actor
1999 The Bird People in China
Tokyo International Film Festival (Best Actor)
1993 Last Song
Yokohama Film Festival (Best Actor)
1993 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
 
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Masahiro Motoki
BornMotoki Masahiro (本木雅弘)
(1965-12-21) 21 December 1965 (age 48)
Okegawa, Japan
Years active1982 - present
Spouse(s)Yayako Uchida (1995-)
AwardsAsian Film Award for Best Actor
2009 Departures
Japanese Academy Award for Best Newcomer
1990 226
Japanese Academy Award for Best Actor
1993 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
2009 Departures
Blue Ribbon Award for Best Actor
1993 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
2009 Departures
Hochi Film Award for Best Actor
1992 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't
Japanese Professional Movie Award for Best Actor
1992 Bang!
Kinema Junpo Award for Best Actor
2009 Departures
Mainichi Film Concours for Best Actor
1999 The Bird People in China
Nikkan Sports Film Award for Best Actor
1999 The Bird People in China
Tokyo International Film Festival (Best Actor)
1993 Last Song
Yokohama Film Festival (Best Actor)
1993 Sumo Do, Sumo Don't

Masahiro Motoki (本木 雅弘 Motoki Masahiro, born December 21, 1965 in Okegawa, Japan) is a Japanese actor. He portrayed protagonist Daigo Kobayashi in Departures, which won the 81st Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film. His performance earned him the Award for Best Actor at the 2009 Asia Pacific Screen Awards, at the 3rd Asian Film Awards and at the 32nd Japan Academy Prize.[1]

Career[edit]

Motoki started his entertainment career as a member of boy band Shibugaki Tai (シブがき隊 Shibugakitai?) (name of the group is abbreviation of tough (渋い Shibui?) kids (ガキ gaki?), which makes it an homonym of astringent persimmon (渋柿 Shibugaki?)) that made a debut in 1982 under the management of Johnny & Associates. They were top idols for a good part of the eighties in Japan.

When the band broke up, he turned to acting. His first main role in film was as a Zen monk in comedy Fancy Dance (ファンシイダンス Fanshii Dansu?) directed by Masayuki Suo. Motoki again starred in Suo's next film Sumo Do, Sumo Don't (シコふんじゃった。 Shiko Funjatta.?) which practically introduced Motoki to the audience outside Japan. He then worked with directors such as Takashi Miike (The Bird People in China (中国の鳥人 Chūgoku no Chōjin?)) and Shinya Tsukamoto (Gemini (双生児 Sōseiji?)).

His breakthrough on the international stage came with the 2008 film Departures (おくりびと Okuribito?) directed by Yōjirō Takita. He played cellist-turned-mortician protagonist in this dramatic film which received the Best Foreign Language Film award at the 81st Academy Awards. The film project started from Motoki's idea after he read a book written by an encoffinment professional.

Family[edit]

He married essayist and musician Yayako Uchida, the daughter of actress Kirin Kiki and rock'n roll singer Yuya Uchida, in 1995. He adopted his wife's surname as a mukoyōshi, thus his real name on the official registry is now Masahiro Uchida.[2] They currently have three children.

Filmography[edit]

Television appearances[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "第32回日本アカデミー賞優秀作品" (in Japanese). Japan Academy Prize. Retrieved 2010-04-10. 
  2. ^ "Motoki Masahiro". Nihon jinmei daijiten (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 18 November 2010. 

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Asian Film Awards
Preceded by
Tony Leung Chiu-Wai
for Lust, Caution
Best Actor
2009
for Departures
Succeeded by
Wang Xueqi
for Bodyguards and Assassins