Minneapolis mayoral election, 2013

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Minneapolis mayoral election, 2013
Minneapolis
2009 ←
November 5, 2013 (2013-11-05)→ 2017

 

Betsy Hodges mayoral forum Oct 2013.jpg

Mark Andrew 2013.jpg

CandidateBetsy HodgesMark Andrew
PartyDFLDFL
Popular vote28,962 (1st round)
38,870 (33rd round)
19,648 (1st round)
24,972 (33rd round)
Percentage36.47% (1st round)
48.95% (33rd round)
24.74% (1st round)
31.44% (33rd round)

 

Don Samuels, 2013 DFL convention.jpg

Cam Winton portrait 2012.jpg

CandidateDon SamuelsCam Winton
PartyDFLIndependent
Popular vote8,350 (1st round)
10,301 (32nd round)
7,533 (1st round)
8,969 (32nd round)
Percentage10.51% (1st round)
12.97% (32nd round)
9.49% (1st round)
11.23% (32nd round)

Mayor before election

R. T. Rybak
DFL

Elected Mayor

Betsy Hodges
DFL

 
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This article is about the Minneapolis mayoral election held in 2013. For information about other elections held concurrently in Minneapolis in 2013, see Minneapolis municipal elections, 2013.
Minneapolis mayoral election, 2013
Minneapolis
2009 ←
November 5, 2013 (2013-11-05)→ 2017

 

Betsy Hodges mayoral forum Oct 2013.jpg

Mark Andrew 2013.jpg

CandidateBetsy HodgesMark Andrew
PartyDFLDFL
Popular vote28,962 (1st round)
38,870 (33rd round)
19,648 (1st round)
24,972 (33rd round)
Percentage36.47% (1st round)
48.95% (33rd round)
24.74% (1st round)
31.44% (33rd round)

 

Don Samuels, 2013 DFL convention.jpg

Cam Winton portrait 2012.jpg

CandidateDon SamuelsCam Winton
PartyDFLIndependent
Popular vote8,350 (1st round)
10,301 (32nd round)
7,533 (1st round)
8,969 (32nd round)
Percentage10.51% (1st round)
12.97% (32nd round)
9.49% (1st round)
11.23% (32nd round)

Mayor before election

R. T. Rybak
DFL

Elected Mayor

Betsy Hodges
DFL

The 2013 Minneapolis mayoral election was held on November 5, 2013 to elect the Mayor of Minneapolis for a four-year term. This was the second mayoral election in the city's history to use instant-runoff voting, popularly known as ranked choice voting, first implemented in the city's 2009 elections. Municipal elections in Minnesota are nonpartisan, although candidates are able to identify with a political party on the ballot. After incumbent Mayor R. T. Rybak announced in late 2012 that he would not seek a fourth term, 35 candidates began campaigns to replace him. Many of these candidates sought the endorsement of the Minneapolis unit of the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL), though the convention ultimately ended with no endorsement.

Although she did not win enough votes to be victorious on the first ballot, DFLer Betsy Hodges held a "commanding" lead and was "poised" to be elected following completion of vote tabulations. Second-place finisher Mark Andrew effectively conceded on election night, saying that it was unlikely that he would overcome Hodges' lead.[1] Hodges was elected in the 33rd round after two days of vote tabulations.

Background[edit]

Minneapolis' 2009 elections were the first in the city's history to implement a system of ranked choice voting (RCV), whereby voters ranked up to their first three choices for an office instead of voting for just one.[2] Turnout that year was, however, the city's lowest in decades with under 46,000 ballots being cast.[2] Incumbent mayor R.T. Rybak won over 33,000 of those votes on the first round of voting, surpassing 22,579 which was the threshold of 50% of ballots cast plus one that were necessary to win the election.[3] A 2010 report prepared for the Minneapolis Elections Department by David Schultz and Kristi Rendahl of Hamline University determined that it was unclear whether the RCV system had met its stated goals of "increasing voter turnout, encouraging more candidates to run, [and] promoting more support for third party candidates."[4]

On December 27, 2012, Rybak, who had been in office since 2001, announced that he would not seek a fourth term as mayor.[5]

Candidates[edit]

A sign with a black frame holds a piece of paper reading "CANDIDATE FILING" with an arrow pointing to the right
A sign pointing to candidate filing

The official filing period with the City of Minneapolis for mayoral candidacy began on July 30 and lasted for two weeks, until August 13.[6] Candidates had until August 15 to withdraw and have their names taken off of the ballot.[7] In March 2013, City Council member Cam Gordon proposed raising the fee to run for mayor to $500, a move intended to "discourag[e] frivolous candidates" according to the Star Tribune.[8] However, the fee remained at $20 for the 2013 filing period.[7] While the election is officially nonpartisan,[9] there was a space on the affidavits of candidacy for candidates to declare their "Political Party or Principle".[10]

A total of 35 people declared their candidacy for mayor, a number that Minneapolis elections officials claimed hadn't been seen on the ballot since at least the 1980s, if not before.[11] Hamline University's Schultz commented that the crowded race would make it difficult for candidates to get name recognition, "[e]specially for some of those candidates who fall further down on the list because they probably don't have a lot of money, and they probably aren't going to get invited to debates."[12] An article in MinnPost suggested that the majority of candidates' campaigns would not have a lot of funding with which to work, nor would they be well organized.[13]

Gregg A. Iverson was the first of six candidates to submit their affidavits of candidacy on July 30, the first day of filing. Meanwhile, three candidates waited until August 13, the final day of the filing period, to submit their affidavits, including Cyd Gorman who was the last to file.[6] No candidates who registered with the Elections Department took advantage of the ability to withdraw their candidacies.[6]

Declared[edit]

A candidate's self-identified political party does not indicate endorsement by that party. Political party endorsements are listed in the "Political party endorsements" section below.

Political party endorsements[edit]

PartyCandidateSource
Fifth Congressional District Independence Party of MinnesotaFirst choiceStephanie Woodruff[50]
Second choiceDon Samuels
Third choiceCam Winton
Libertarian Party of MinnesotaFirst choiceChristopher Clark[51]
Second choiceKurtis W. Hanna
Third choiceCam Winton
Minnesota Pirate PartyKurtis W. Hanna[52]
Minneapolis City Republican CommitteeCam Winton[53][note 3]

Gallery[edit]

Withdrawn[edit]

A young man waves at a parade, while a campaign sign with his name, Gary Schiff, is held up behind him.
A middle aged man in a suit sits at a table, hands folded in front of him, eyes cast downward.
Schiff, Thomas

Declined[edit]

Tina Smith in 2012

Campaigns[edit]

Announcements[edit]

Almost a month before Rybak announced that he intended to leave office, DFL City Council member Betsy Hodges of Minneapolis' thirteenth ward declared that she would run for mayor.[59] Her plans, however, were contingent upon whether Rybak would elect to run for a fourth time.[59] When Rybak made his announcement in December 2012, Hodges formally proclaimed her candidacy.[5]

The Star Tribune reported in early December 2012 that former DFL City Council President Jackie Cherryhomes was also considering a bid for the mayor's office.[60] Cherryhomes last held office in 2001, but remained involved at the Minneapolis City Hall as a lobbyist.[61] Like Hodges, she only intended to run if Rybak opted not to[60] and, like Hodges, she announced that she would run promptly after Rybak declared he would not, on December 27.[61]

DFL City Council member Gary Schiff from Minneapolis' ninth ward was also mulling a mayoral run in mid-December when he filed paperwork to form a committee that could support his potential candidacy.[62] Unlike Hodges and Cherryhomes, Schiff stated that whether he would run or not would probably not be contingent upon what Rybak decided to do.[62] On January 29, Schiff announced that he would seek the mayor's seat.[63]

Fifth ward City Council member Don Samuels, another DFLer, was considering running for the office shortly after Rybak announced that he wouldn't run again.[64] Samuels had served on the City Council for a decade at that time and had most recently run but dropped out of a race for Hennepin County Commissioner.[64] A day after Schiff made his candidacy official, Samuels entered the race as well, becoming the third sitting member of City Council to do so.[65]

Mark Andrew, formerly a Hennepin County Commissioner and the chair of the DFL from 1995 until 1997, expressed in early January that he was "very interested" in potentially vying for the position of mayor.[66] Since leaving public office, Andrew had begun GreenMark, an environmental marketing firm.[67] He officially declared his candidacy on February 7, 2013, acknowledging his late entrance into the race relative to some of his opponents.[67]

Running as an independent, attorney Cam Winton is mentioned in a Star Tribune article dated March 20, 2013.[68] Winton, a Republican, stated that he did not intend to seek the DFL endorsement, making him the only candidate declared at the time to do so.[69]

Dan Cohen, a Republican former City Council member, said on May 28 that he would run for mayor if the DFL failed to agree on an endorsement.[70] Cohen, who sits on Minneapolis' Charter and Planning Commissions, was a Council member in the 1960s[71] He last ran for mayor in 1969, losing to Charles Stenvig.[25] Cohen formally declared his candidacy on June 18.[71]

Pre-convention debates[edit]

The first debate between mayoral candidates took place on March 27 at the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs.[72] Moderated by professor of political science Larry Jacobs, as well as some of his students, the debate included Andrew, Hodges, Schiff, Cherryhomes, and Samuels, noted by Jacobs as being the "leading DFL candidates".[72] Winton observed the debate from the audience but was not invited to participate as he was not seeking the DFL endorsement.[72] Candidates fielded questions on the Vikings Stadium (responding anywhere from heavily in favor of the project to staunchly against it), property taxes (no candidate accepted a pledge from Jacobs not to raise them), how to reviatlize North Minneapolis, and their qualifications for the job of mayor.[72]

DFL endorsement convention[edit]

From left to right, an older man in a dark suit, a middle aged woman in a white blazer, and a middle aged woman in a salmon blouse sit at a long dark table in front of dark blue curtains.
From left to right, a bespectacled middle aged man, a younger bald man holding a wireless microphone, and a balding middle aged man, all in suits, sit at a long dark table in front of dark blue curtains.
Samuels, Hodges, Cherryhomes, Andrew, Schiff, and Thomas seated at the DFL endorsement convention on June 15, 2013

An endorsement convention was held by the DFL on June 15, 2013, at the Minneapolis Convention Center.[73] All candidates then declared with the exception of Winton (Andrew, Cherryhomes, Hodges, Samuels, Schiff, and Thomas) sought the nomination and were present at the event.[73] Sixty percent of delegate votes were required to receive the endorsement.[74]

During the first round of voting, Jim Thomas, Cheryhomes, and Samuels were eliminated as each failed to secure the ten percent of the vote required to move on to the second round.[75] Schiff was eliminated after the second ballot, leaving Andrew and Hodges.[73] Andrew came first in every round of voting but never reached the 60 percent threshold.[75] Hodges invited her delegates outside of the Convention Center to eat pizza.[75] Their absence meant that a quorum was not present at the convention and so, on the fifth ballot, the convention ended with no endorsement.[73]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Mark
Andrew
Jackie
Cherryhomes
Dan
Cohen
Bob
Fine
Betsy
Hodges
Don
Samuels
Cam
Winton
Stephanie
Woodruff
OtherUndecided
Pulse Opinion ResearchSeptember 8–10, 2013800± 3.5%10%7%16%1%14%16%9%5%6%16%

Results[edit]

None of the candidates passed the threshold to be elected in the first round, necessitating several rounds of vote transfers. Betsy Hodges was elected in the 33rd round.

Minneapolis mayoral election, 2013[76]
Political party/principleCandidate % 1st ChoiceRound 1Round 2Round 3Round 4Round 5Round 6Round 7Round 8Round 9Round 10Round 11Round 12Round 13Round 14Round 15Round 16Round 17
DFLBetsy Hodges36.4728,96228,98328,98428,98828,99428,99929,00329,01529,02329,02729,03129,03629,04329,07129,10329,11729,123
DFLMark Andrew24.7419,64819,66419,66819,66919,67619,67719,68319,68819,69019,69319,69819,70819,72519,73819,75419,79619,803
DFLDon Samuels10.518,3508,3548,3558,3578,3658,3708,3738,3788,3818,3828,3858,3928,3978,4058,4148,4238,428
independent responsible inclusiveCam Winton9.497,5337,5407,5427,5447,5447,5477,5487,5567,5627,5647,5677,5707,5717,5767,5917,5937,613
DFLJackie Cherryhomes4.473,5483,5513,5513,5513,5513,5563,5603,5663,5683,5713,5803,5863,6093,6133,6173,6283,636
DFLBob Fine2.652,1012,1032,1052,1062,1082,1122,1152,1172,1182,1212,1222,1252,1352,1372,1412,1472,147
Jobs Downtown CasinoDan Cohen2.281,8081,8111,8131,8151,8151,8161,8191,8201,8261,8321,8371,8451,8521,8551,8591,8651,870
DFLStephanie Woodruff1.281,0141,0161,0171,0181,0191,0201,0201,0241,0251,0291,0291,0331,0391,0471,0541,0601,060
Simplify GovernmentMark V. Anderson1.249849859869899909959969971,0021,0071,0101,0181,0201,0251,0281,0291,045
Green Party of MinnesotaDoug Mann0.98779782787791794796796800801802809813816831836841846
Republican Party of MinnesotaOle Savior0.88700701702702702705705705711715715720722724734735753
We the people...Abdul M. Rahaman "The Rock"0.45355356356356357358360360360365369372377382382386388
DFLAlicia K. Bennett0.45354355355355356356359360363367370376381382382393395
Green Party of MinnesotaJames Everett0.44349350351352355358358359365368370371371380383384388
Count All RankingsCaptain Jack Sparrow0.33265270271271277278279279280284288293295299304307309
Socialist Workers PartyTony Lane0.28220221224224224225226227228230231236238244246250251
DFLMike Gould0.26204207207207207207209210210214217218220221227235236
Minnesota Pirate PartyKurtis W. Hanna0.25200200200201202202202202204204206207207214214216222
Stop Foreclosures NowJaymie Kelly0.25197198198198199200203204204206215220224236241242243
Libertarian Party of MinnesotaChristopher Clark0.24192194196196196197197197200202202203205206212212266
LibertarianChristopher Robin Zimmerman0.22172172172173173177178179182185186188190192194194
DFLJeffrey Alan Wagner0.21167167167167167168171171172174176179186188189
Local Energy/FoodTroy Benjegerdes0.19149149150150150150152156157158158164167
IndependentNeal Baxter0.19147147147148148153153153168172173176178180
DFLGregg A. Iverson0.18146146147149149149149149152153155156
End Homelessness NowJoshua Rea0.14110110110113113114115115116119
Jobs & JusticeMerrill Anderson0.14109109109112113113118121122123139
Last Minneapolis MayorBill Kahn0.13102103104105106106108108110
IndependentJohn Leslie Hartwig0.1297979999100101101101
Legacy-Next GenerationEdmund Bernard Bruyere0.0972727272727373
Independence Party of MinnesotaRahn V. Workcuff0.086666666666
The people's choiceJames "Jimmy" L. Stroud, Jr.0.08656666666868
Demand Transit RevolutionBob "Again" Carney Jr0.0756565657
Police ReformCyd Gorman0.05393939
Lauraist CommunistJohn Charles Wilson0.053738
N/AWrite-in0.15118
Exhausted ballots37435759698698115148177210247269310362393
Political party/principleCandidate % 1st ChoiceRound 18Round 19Round 20Round 21Round 22Round 23Round 24Round 25Round 26Round 27Round 28Round 29Round 30Round 31Round 32Round 33 % Final
DFLBetsy Hodges36.4729,17229,18529,25929,31629,32429,38229,41729,49029,59229,60630,04530,28930,67230,96332,58138,87048.95
DFLMark Andrew24.7419,81319,84319,85119,87619,88419,90719,94219,98720,02220,04420,15120,20920,33620,52721,83124,97231.44
DFLDon Samuels10.518,4398,4558,4618,4788,4838,4948,5018,5308,5568,5808,6238,6998,8449,09710,301
independent responsible inclusiveCam Winton9.497,6347,6377,6427,6477,7047,7157,7187,7237,7307,8237,8417,9368,0308,4498,969
DFLJackie Cherryhomes4.473,6383,6543,6623,6693,6713,6823,6903,7113,7413,7513,7693,8693,9614,070
DFLBob Fine2.652,1552,1682,1722,1762,1822,1982,2042,2232,2362,2552,2862,3432,4172,559
Jobs Downtown CasinoDan Cohen2.281,8791,8871,8971,9001,9161,9391,9441,9541,9632,0162,0492,1022,143
DFLStephanie Woodruff1.281,0631,0781,0851,0891,0901,0981,1151,1861,1981,2021,2391,259
Simplify GovernmentMark V. Anderson1.241,0491,0491,0531,0561,0741,0781,0861,0971,1061,1531,163
Green Party of MinnesotaDoug Mann0.988638678999619719939961,0021,0891,106
Republican Party of MinnesotaOle Savior0.88757759760760798810814817817
We the people...Abdul M. Rahaman "The Rock"0.45391396398398399415
DFLAlicia K. Bennett0.45396416425431434437443
Green Party of MinnesotaJames Everett0.44400403413428431440444452
Count All RankingsCaptain Jack Sparrow0.33325329333341352
Socialist Workers PartyTony Lane0.28256263276
DFLMike Gould0.26238
Minnesota Pirate PartyKurtis W. Hanna0.25
Stop Foreclosures NowJaymie Kelly0.25248252
Libertarian Party of MinnesotaChristopher Clark0.24280283283287
LibertarianChristopher Robin Zimmerman0.22
DFLJeffrey Alan Wagner0.21
Local Energy/FoodTroy Benjegerdes0.19
IndependentNeal Baxter0.19
DFLGregg A. Iverson0.18
End Homelessness NowJoshua Rea0.14
Jobs & JusticeMerrill Anderson0.14
Last Minneapolis MayorBill Kahn0.13
IndependentJohn Leslie Hartwig0.12
Legacy-Next GenerationEdmund Bernard Bruyere0.09
Independence Party of MinnesotaRahn V. Workcuff0.08
The people's choiceJames "Jimmy" L. Stroud, Jr.0.08
Demand Transit RevolutionBob "Again" Carney Jr0.07
Police ReformCyd Gorman0.05
Lauraist CommunistJohn Charles Wilson0.05
N/AWrite-in0.15
Exhausted ballots4194915466027028271,1011,2431,3651,8792,2492,7093,0123,7505,73315,57319.61
  • Threshold: 39,708
  • Valid: 79,415[note 4]
  • Undervotes: 686
  • Turnout: 80,101

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Five DFLers: Mark Andrew, Jackie Cherryhomes, Betsy Hodges, Don Samuels, Gary Schiff and Cam Winton (an Independent {i.e.: Republican}) were featured in the Star Tribune article: "Minneapolis Mayoral Hopefuls".
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Eight candidates were mentioned in Curtis Gilbert's August 13th 2013 report for MPR News, "35 candidates queue up in Minneapolis mayor's race": "...Don Samuels and Betsy Hodges, former council members Jackie Cherryhomes and Dan Cohen, former Hennepin County commissioner Mark Andrew, Park Board Commissioner Bob Fine, business executive Stephanie Woodruff and attorney Cam Winton. ..."
  3. ^ A "recommendation." Not an official endorsement.
  4. ^ Total votes counted in the first round. Does not include undervotes, overvotes, defective, or spoiled ballots.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Betsy Hodges poised to be new Minneapolis mayor". MinnPost. November 5, 2013. Retrieved November 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Gilbert, Curtis (February 13, 2013). "Minneapolis' mayoral race puts test to ranked-choice voting system". Minnesota Public Radio News. Retrieved June 17, 2013. 
  3. ^ "2009 Minneapolis Municipal Election Results: Mayor". City of Minneapolis. September 27, 2011. Retrieved June 17, 2013. 
  4. ^ Schultz, David; Rendahl, Kristi (June 21, 2010). "Evaluating Ranked Choice Voting in the 2009 Minneapolis Elections: A report for the Minneapolis Elections Department". Minneapolis Elections Department. p. 3. Retrieved June 17, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d Gilbert, Curtis (December 27, 2012). "Rybak won't seek 4th term as mayor of Minneapolis". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al "Candidate Filings". Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 31, 2013. Archived from the original on October 30, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "2013 Deadlines for Filing for Office". Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. 2013. Archived from the original on August 15, 2013. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  8. ^ Rao, Maya (March 5, 2013). "Want to run for Minneapolis mayor? It might cost $500 to file". Star Tribune. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  9. ^ Liable, Matt (January 28, 2013). "What to expect for 2013 Minneapolis elections". City of Minneapolis. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Mark V Anderson Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 31, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  11. ^ Gilbert, Curtis (August 13, 2013). "35 candidates queue up in Minneapolis mayor's race". MPR News. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  12. ^ McCoy, Blake (August 13, 2013). "Record 35 candidates vying for Minneapolis mayor". KARE 11. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  13. ^ Kimball, Joe (August 14, 2013). "Without Rybak in the race, Minneapolis mayor's race draws 35 candidates". MinnPost. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Merrill Anderson Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 5, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2013. 
  15. ^ Rao, Maya (February 7, 2013). "Andrew latest to join Minneapolis mayoral race". Star Tribune. Retrieved February 10, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Mark Andrew Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 5, 2013. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Neal Baxter Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Troy Benjegerdes Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Alicia K. Bennett Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Edmund Bernard Bruyere Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 1, 2013. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Bob "Again" Carney Jr Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 6, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2013. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g Boros, Karen (January 11, 2013). "Potential successors to Minneapolis Mayor Rybak already lining up support". MinnPost. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Christopher Clark Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  24. ^ http://vote.minneapolismn.gov/www/groups/public/@clerk/documents/webcontent/WCMS1P-112086.pdf
  25. ^ a b Brandt, Steve (June 19, 2013). "Cohen hoping for a better finish this time". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 26, 2013. 
  26. ^ "James Everett Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 1, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Bob Fine Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 5, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Cyd Gorman Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 13, 2013. Retrieved August 14, 2013. 
  29. ^ "Mike Gould Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 6, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2013. 
  30. ^ "Kurtis W. Hanna Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  31. ^ "John Leslie Hartwig Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 7, 2013. Retrieved August 7, 2013. 
  32. ^ "Gregg A. Iverson Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 30, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  33. ^ "Bill Kahn Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 13, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  34. ^ "Jaymie Kelly Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  35. ^ "Tony Lane Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 8, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Doug Mann Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 30, 2013. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  37. ^ "Abdun M Rahaman "The Rock" Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 31, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  38. ^ "Joshua Rea Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  39. ^ "Ole Savior Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.Minneapolis.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 30, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  40. ^ "Captain Jack Sparrow Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  41. ^ "James "Jimmy" L. Stroud, Jr. Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Jeffrey Alan Wagner Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 13, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  43. ^ "John Charles Wilson" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 2, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 
  44. ^ Rao, Maya (March 25, 2013). "Independent Minneapolis mayoral candidate says he's 'the only fresh set of eyes'". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 14, 2013. 
  45. ^ "Cam Winton Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 12, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013. 
  46. ^ Boros, Karen (July 15, 2013). "Mayoral candidate Woodruff: School achievement gap is Minneapolis' biggest issue". MinnPost. Retrieved July 23, 2013. 
  47. ^ "Stephanie Woodruff Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. August 8, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Rahn V Workcuff Affidavit of Candidacy" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 30, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  49. ^ "Christopher Robin Zimmerman" (PDF). Vote.MinneapolisMN.gov. City of Minneapolis. July 30, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2013. 
  50. ^ "Independence: The Party of Reform". Fifth Congressional District Independence Party of Minnesota. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
  51. ^ "2013 Candidates". Libertarian Party of Minnesota. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  52. ^ "Minneapolis 2013 Municipal Pirate Candidates!". Minnesota Pirate Party. Retrieved September 30, 2013. 
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