Mind your own business

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"Mind your own business" is a common English saying which asks for a respect of other people's privacy. It can mean that a person should stop meddling in what does not concern that person, etc. Its initialism is MYOB.

Origin[edit]

Most modern theologians don't believe that the phrase "Mind your own business" is of direct biblical derivation,[citation needed], though something similar appears in the where St. Paul tells the church of Thessaloniki about this manner of living in his instructions as a way of Christian life (I Thessalonians 4:11). The Greek phrase is πράσσειν τὰ ἴδια which translates as "manage yourself".[1]

20th century[edit]

In the 1930s, a slang version rendered the saying as "Mind your own beeswax". It is meant to soften the force of the retort.[2] Folk etymology has it that this idiom was used in the colonial period when women would sit by the fireplace making wax candles together,[3] though there are many other theories.[4]

In the 1927 children's book "Mr Scoodle-do and his many adventures" by Minerva Hall the little boy was taught what M.Y.O.B. means by Scoodle-do.

In the classic science fiction story ...And Then There Were None, Eric Frank Russell shortened "Mind Your Own Business" to "MYOB" or "Myob!", which was used as a form of civil disobedience on the planet of the libertarian Gands.[5] Russell's short story, ...And Then There Were None, was subsequently incorporated into his 1962 novel The Great Explosion.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1 Thessalonians 4:11-12 NIV". biblegateway.com. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
  2. ^ Palmatier, Robert Allen (1995). Speaking of Animals: A Dictionary of Animal Metaphors. Greenwood Press. pp. Google Books Search, p.23. ISBN 0-313-29490-9. 
  3. ^ Idiomsite.com, Beeswax
  4. ^ Worldwidewords.org
  5. ^ Abelard.org

External links[edit]