Milton, West Virginia

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Milton, West Virginia
Town
Main Street along U.S. Route 60 in Milton in 2007
Location of Milton, West Virginia
Coordinates: 38°26′10″N 82°08′00″W / 38.43611°N 82.13333°W / 38.43611; -82.13333
CountryUnited States
StateWest Virginia
CountyCabell
Area[1]
 • Total1.58 sq mi (4.09 km2)
 • Land1.54 sq mi (3.99 km2)
 • Water0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation584 ft (178 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total2,423
 • Estimate (2012[3])2,498
 • Density1,573.4/sq mi (607.5/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code25541
Area code(s)304
FIPS code54-54484[4]
GNIS feature ID1543433[5]
Websitehttp://www.thecityofmiltonwv.com/
 
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Milton, West Virginia
Town
Main Street along U.S. Route 60 in Milton in 2007
Location of Milton, West Virginia
Coordinates: 38°26′10″N 82°08′00″W / 38.43611°N 82.13333°W / 38.43611; -82.13333
CountryUnited States
StateWest Virginia
CountyCabell
Area[1]
 • Total1.58 sq mi (4.09 km2)
 • Land1.54 sq mi (3.99 km2)
 • Water0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation584 ft (178 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total2,423
 • Estimate (2012[3])2,498
 • Density1,573.4/sq mi (607.5/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code25541
Area code(s)304
FIPS code54-54484[4]
GNIS feature ID1543433[5]
Websitehttp://www.thecityofmiltonwv.com/

Milton is a town in Cabell County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 2,423 at the 2010 census.

Milton is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. It incorporated in 1876 by David Harshbarger a large land holder, and is named for Milton Reese, Milton's first postmaster, in the vicinity at the time the town was established.

Geography[edit]

The Mud River in Milton in 2007

Milton is located at 38°26′10″N 82°08′00″W / 38.435998°N 82.133197°W / 38.435998; -82.133197Coordinates: 38°26′10″N 82°08′00″W / 38.435998°N 82.133197°W / 38.435998; -82.133197 (38.435998, -82.133197),[6] along the Mud River.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.58 square miles (4.09 km2), of which, 1.54 square miles (3.99 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,423 people, 1,132 households, and 666 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,573.4 inhabitants per square mile (607.5 /km2). There were 1,243 housing units at an average density of 807.1 per square mile (311.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.6% White, 0.7% African American, 0.1% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.0% of the population.

There were 1,132 households of which 25.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.2% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.2% were non-families. 36.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.76.

The median age in the town was 42.2 years. 20.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.8% were from 25 to 44; 28.4% were from 45 to 64; and 18.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 46.7% male and 53.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,206 people, 1,010 households, and 628 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,400.0 inhabitants per square mile (539.1/km²). There were 1,116 housing units at an average density of 708.2 per square mile (272.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 99.23% White, 0.45% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 0.09% from other races, and 0.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.68% of the population.

There were 1,010 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.8% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.78.

In the town the population was spread out with 21.6% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 19.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 87.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $29,348, and the median income for a family was $31,786. Males had a median income of $31,003 versus $19,457 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,384. About 16.6% of families and 17.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.2% of those under age 18 and 8.3% of those age 65 or over.

Landmarks[edit]

The Blenko Glass Visitor Center in 2006

Milton is noted for its historic covered bridge across the nearby Mud River. In 2002, the covered bridge was moved to nearby Pumpkin Park. The town is also known for Blenko Glass, which is across the street from Pumpkin Park. The Mountaineer Opry House features bluegrass music on Saturday nights. Milton also has an extensive Flea Market covering a couple of acres (including parking) with both indoor and outdoor stalls.

Education[edit]

Milton is served by the schools of the Wayne County Board of Education. . Primary education is given at Milton Elementary, while middle school students attend Milton Middle School. High school students began attending Ceredo Kenova High School, a facility resulting from the consolidation of Barboursville High School and Milton High School, in the December of 2013. Cabell Midland High School is in Ona. A new middle school has recently been constructed, and the previous building is now being used for Preschool.

Milton High School was once Grant District High School. While Milton High School was in operation, the schools football team enjoyed many successes under Head Coach Richard Williams which includes winning the WVSSAC Pioneer Athletic Conference Championship 1990 with a 7-3 record. The 1990 football team was later honored with the signing of Bubby Lunsford to the Marshall University Thundering Herd a year later as seniors.

Events[edit]

Milton is currently the host of the county fair of Cabell County, West Virginia. Milton is also noted for its annual Pumpkin Festival, held in early October. The festival has occurred regularly since 1985. Prizes are given out for extremely large pumpkins. Many local artisans come to the Pumpkin Festival to share and sell their arts and crafts.

References[edit]

External links[edit]