Michael Greyeyes

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Michael Greyeyes
MichaelGreyeyes2.jpg
BornMichael Joseph Charles Greyeyes
(1967-06-04) June 4, 1967 (age 47)
Canada Qu'Appelle Valley, Saskatchewan, Canada
OccupationActor, Dancer, Choreographer and Director
Height6' 2" (1.88 m)
Spouse(s)Nancy Latoszewski
 
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Michael Greyeyes
MichaelGreyeyes2.jpg
BornMichael Joseph Charles Greyeyes
(1967-06-04) June 4, 1967 (age 47)
Canada Qu'Appelle Valley, Saskatchewan, Canada
OccupationActor, Dancer, Choreographer and Director
Height6' 2" (1.88 m)
Spouse(s)Nancy Latoszewski

Michael Greyeyes (born June 4, 1967) is a Canadian actor. He is Plains Cree from the Muskeg Lake First Nation in Saskatchewan. His father is from the Muskeg Lake First Nation and his mother is from the Sweetgrass First Nation, both located in Saskatchewan.

He completed his Master's Degree in Fine Arts at the School of Theatre and Dance at Kent State University and graduated at the top of his class in May 2003. He is a graduate of The National Ballet School in 1984, he went on to apprentice with The National Ballet of Canada before joining the company as a full Corps de Ballet member in 1987. After three years, he left the National Ballet to join the company of choreographer Eliot Feld in New York City.

Michael's acting career started in 1993 when he was cast as "Juh" in TNT's "Geronimo", which led to numerous television appearances, including guest spots in "Promised Land", "Walker, Texas Ranger", "Dr Quinn Medicine Woman", "Magnificent Seven", "Millennium", and he co-hosted the 1999 Aboriginal Achievement Awards. In 1997 he won the title role in TNT's "Crazy Horse", and in 1998 starred in "Stolen Women, Captured Hearts", with Janine Turner and Patrick Bergen. He featured in the mini-series "Rough Riders", "Big Bear', and "True Women". Films in which Michael has appeared are: "Dance Me Outside", "Smoke Signals", "The Minion" (also released as "Fallen Knight'), "Firestorm', "League of Old Men', and more recently, 'Skipped Parts", "Looking for Lost Bird", and 'Race Against Time". He worked on a film with Linda Fiorentino and Ben Kingsley "Till the End of Time", which has been put on hiatus.

His play 'Nunatsuaq'- (a science-fiction journey aboard the interplanetary spaceship 'Elena' which takes the characters deep into Inuit mythology in a voyage of self-discovery) is currently still in development. However, public readings of this project took place in January 2001 at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, in Toronto. In February 2001 he featured in an episode of the WB Network's "Charmed" and in March was interviewed by Evan Adams on APTN's "Buffalo Track's". In March 2001 he was in the UK filming a pilot for a new CBS series, "Sam's Circus".

Since 2001 Michael made appearances in several films: "Sunshine State", "ZigZag", and "Skinwalkers" based on the book by Tony Hillerman. He also appeared in episodes of "Body and Soul" and "MythQuest".

Soon after gaining his degree he played the lead role in "The Reawakening", a film by Diane Fraher. In this same year he was invited to be a member of a panel of judges for short films at the USA film festival in Dallas, Texas. He finished off the year by appearing in the ABC/Hallmark mini-series, "Dreamkeeper" playing an Iroquois Thunder Spirit.

Michael also explored the modern form of traditional dancing, Powwow. His journey of exploration was documented in a feature entitled "He Who Dreams: Michael on the Powwow Trail" for CBC by Adrienne Clarkson.

At this moment he is an actor, choreographer and director. Recent works include Passchendaele (feature film), The Threshing Floor (a dance work he co-choreographed with Santee Smith), Triptych (a short film broadcast nationally on Bravo!), and The Journey (Pimooteewin), a new opera work he directed with music by Melissa Hui and libretto by Tomson Highway. He also did the voice of Tommy in the action game Prey.

Michael is married to wife Nancy, and has a two daughters, Eva Rose, born in May 2002 and Lilia Frances Jean, born on 1 October 2004.

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