Men's pole vault world record progression

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search

The first world record in the men's pole vault was recognised by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1912.[1]

As of June 21, 2009, 71 world records have been ratified by the IAAF in the event. The introduction in the early 1950s of flexible vaulting poles made from composites such as fiberglass or carbon fiber allowed vaulters to achieve greater height.[1]

Record progression[edit]

RecordAthleteNationVenueDate#[2]
4.02 mMarc Wright United StatesCambridge, U.S.June 8, 1912[1]1
4.09 mFrank Foss United StatesAntwerp, BelgiumAugust 20, 1920[1]1
4.12 mCharles Hoff NorwayCopenhagen, DenmarkSeptember 22, 1922[1]1
4.21 mCharles Hoff NorwayCopenhagen, DenmarkJuly 22, 1923[1]2
4.23 mCharles Hoff NorwayOslo, NorwayAugust 13, 1925[1]3
4.25 mCharles Hoff NorwayTurku, FinlandSeptember 27, 1925[1]4
4.27 mSabin Carr United StatesPhiladelphia, U.S.May 27, 1927[1]1
4.30 mLee Barnes United StatesFresno, U.S.April 28, 1928[1]1
4.37 mWilliam Graber United StatesPalo Alto, U.S.July 16, 1932[1]1
4.39 mKeith Brown United StatesBoston, U.S.June 1, 1935[1]1
4.43 mGeorge Varoff United StatesPrinceton, New Jersey, U.S.July 4, 1936[1]1
4.54 mBill Sefton United StatesLos Angeles, U.S.May 29, 1937[1]1
4.54 mEarle Meadows United StatesLos Angeles, U.S.May 29, 1937[1]1
4.60 mCornelius Warmerdam United StatesFresno, U.S.June 29, 1940[1]1
4.72 mCornelius Warmerdam United StatesCompton, U.S.June 26, 1941[1]2
4.77 mCornelius Warmerdam United StatesModesto, U.S.May 23, 1942[1]3
4.78 mRobert Gutowski United StatesPalo Alto, U.S.April 27, 1957[1]1
4.80 mDon Bragg United StatesPalo Alto, U.S.July 2, 1960[1]1
4.83 mGeorge Davies United StatesBoulder, U.S.May 20, 1961[1]1
4.89 mJohn Uelses United StatesSanta Barbara, U.S.March 31, 1962[1]1
4.93 mDave Tork United StatesWalnut, U.S.April 28, 1962[1]1
4.94 mPentti Nikula FinlandKauhava, FinlandJune 22, 1962[1]1
5.00 mBrian Sternberg United StatesPhiladelphia, U.S.April 27, 1963[1]1
5.08 mBrian Sternberg United StatesComptonJune 7, 1963[1]2
5.13 mJohn Pennel United StatesLondon, EnglandAugust 5, 1963[1]1
5.20 mJohn Pennel United StatesCoral Gables, U.S.August 24, 1963[1]2
5.23 mFred Hansen United StatesSan Diego, U.S.June 13, 1964[1]1
5.28 mFred Hansen United StatesLos Angeles, U.S.July 25, 1964[1]2
5.32 mBob Seagren United StatesFresno, U.S.May 14, 1966[1]1
5.34 mJohn Pennel United StatesLos Angeles, U.S.July 23, 1966[1]3
5.36 mBob Seagren United StatesSan Diego, U.S.June 10, 1967[1]2
5.38 mPaul Wilson United StatesBakersfield, U.S.June 23, 1967[1]1
5.41 m ABob Seagren United StatesEcho Summit, U.S.September 12, 1968[1]3
5.44 mJohn Pennel United StatesSacramento, U.S.June 21, 1969[1]4
5.45 mWolfgang Nordwig East GermanyBerlin, GermanyJune 17, 1970[1]1
5.46 mWolfgang Nordwig East GermanyTurin, ItalySeptember 3, 1970[1]2
5.49 mChristos Papanikolaou GreeceAthens, GreeceOctober 24, 1970[1]1
5.51 mKjell Isaksson SwedenAustin, U.S.April 8, 1972[1]1
5.54 mKjell Isaksson SwedenLos Angeles, U.S.April 15, 1972[1]2
5.55 mKjell Isaksson SwedenHelsingborg, SwedenJune 12, 1972[1]3
5.63 mBob Seagren United StatesEugene, U.S.July 2, 1972[1]4
5.65 mDavid Roberts United StatesGainesville, U.S.March 28, 1975[1]1
5.67 mEarl Bell United StatesWichita, U.S.May 29, 1976[1]1
5.70 mDavid Roberts United StatesEugene, U.S.June 22, 1976[1]2
5.72 mWładysław Kozakiewicz PolandMilan, ItalyMay 11, 1980[1]1
5.75 mThierry Vigneron FranceParis, FranceJune 1, 1980[1]1
5.75 mThierry Vigneron FranceLille, FranceJune 29, 1980[1]2
5.77 mPhilippe Houvion FranceParis, FranceJuly 17, 1980[1]1
5.78 mWładysław Kozakiewicz PolandMoscow, Soviet UnionJuly 30, 1980[1]2
5.80 mThierry Vigneron FranceMâcon, FranceJune 20, 1981[1]3
5.81 mVladimir Polyakov Soviet UnionTbilisi, Soviet UnionJune 26, 1981[1]1
5.82 mPierre Quinon FranceCologne, GermanyAugust 28, 1983[1]1
5.83 mThierry Vigneron FranceRome, ItalySeptember 1, 1983[1]4
5.85 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionBratislava, CzechoslovakiaMay 26, 1984[1]1
5.88 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionParis, FranceJune 2, 1984[1]2
5.90 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionLondon, EnglandJuly 13, 1984[1]3
5.91 mThierry Vigneron FranceRome, ItalyAugust 31, 1984[1]5
5.94 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionRome, ItalyAugust 31, 1984[1]4
6.00 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionParis, FranceJuly 13, 1985[1]5
6.01 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionMoscow, Soviet UnionJune 8, 1986[1]6
6.03 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionPrague, CzechoslovakiaJune 23, 1987[1]7
6.05 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionBratislava, CzechoslovakiaJune 9, 1988[1]8
6.06 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionNice, FranceJuly 10, 1988[1]9
6.07 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionShizuoka, JapanMay 6, 1991[1]10
6.08 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionMoscow, Soviet UnionJune 9, 1991[1]11
6.09 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionFormia, ItalyJuly 8, 1991[1]12
6.10 mSergey Bubka Soviet UnionMalmö, SwedenAugust 5, 1991[1]13
6.11 mSergey Bubka UkraineDijon, FranceJune 13, 1992[1]14
6.12 mSergey Bubka UkrainePadua, ItalyAugust 30, 1992[1]15
6.13 mSergey Bubka UkraineTokyo, JapanSeptember 19, 1992[1]16
6.14 m A[3]Sergey Bubka UkraineSestriere, ItalyJuly 31, 1994[1]17
6.16 m iRenaud Lavillenie FranceDonetsk, UkraineFebruary 15, 2014[4]1

A = mark set at altitude
i = indoor mark

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (pdf). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 555–6. Archived from the original on November 23, 2012. Retrieved August 5, 2009. 
  2. ^ The numbered occurrence of the athlete breaking the world record, in other words "#7" would indicate the 7th time the athlete broke the world record.
  3. ^ "From 2000, IAAF Rule 260.18s (formerly 260.6.a) was amended to say world records (as opposed to indoor world records) can be set in a facility 'with or without a roof.' So far, only one event - the women's pole vault - has been affected by this change, which was not applied retrospectively."[1] (p.546) Sergey Bubka set an indoor record of 6.15 m on February 21, 1993, in excess of the outdoor record, before this rule came into effect. Lavillenie's indoor world record was set after the rule came into effect, and thus since it exceeds Bubka's 6.14 m set outdoors, it is also the world record.
  4. ^ http://www.iaaf.org/news/press-release/pole-vault-world-record-ratified

External links[edit]