Men's 100 metres world record progression

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IAAF-ratified world record progression for the men's 100 m.

The first record in the 100 metres for men (athletics) was recognised by the International Amateur Athletics Federation, now known as the International Association of Athletics Federations, in 1912. The record now is 9.58 seconds which was run by Usain Bolt.

As of 21 June 2011, the IAAF had ratified 67 records in the event, not including rescinded records.[1]

Unofficial progression before the IAAF[edit]

TimeAthleteNationalityLocation of racesDate
10.8Luther Cary United StatesParis, FranceJuly 4, 1891
Cecil Lee United KingdomBrussels, BelgiumSeptember 25, 1892
Etienne De Re BelgiumBrussels, BelgiumAugust 4, 1893
L. Atcherley United KingdomFrankfurt/Main, GermanyApril 13, 1895
Harry Beaton United KingdomRotterdam, NetherlandsAugust 28, 1895
Harald Anderson-Arbin SwedenHelsingborg, SwedenAugust 9, 1896
Isaac Westergren SwedenGävle, SwedenSeptember 11, 1898
 SwedenGävle, SwedenSeptember 10, 1899
Frank Jarvis United StatesParis, FranceJuly 14, 1900
Walter Tewksbury United StatesParis, FranceJuly 14, 1900
Carl Ljung SwedenStockholm, SwedenSeptember 23, 1900
Walter Tewksbury United StatesPhiladelphia, United StatesOctober 6, 1900
André Passat FranceBordeaux, FranceJune 14, 1903
Louis Kuhn  SwitzerlandBordeaux, FranceJune 14, 1903
Harald Grønfeldt DenmarkAarhus, DenmarkJuly 5, 1903
Eric Frick SwedenJönköping, SwedenAugust 9, 1903
10.6Knut Lindberg SwedenGothenburg, SwedenAugust 26, 1906
10.5Emil Ketterer GermanyKarlsruhe, GermanyJuly 9, 1911
Richard Rau GermanyBraunschweig, GermanyAugust 13, 1911
Richard Rau GermanyMunich, GermanyMay 12, 1912
Erwin Kern GermanyMunich, GermanyMay 26, 1912

IAAF record progression[edit]

ratified
not ratified
ratified but later rescinded

Records 1912–1976[edit]

TimeWindAutoAthleteNationalityLocation of raceDateRef
10.6Donald Lippincott United StatesStockholm, SwedenJuly 6, 1912[2]
Jackson Scholz United StatesSeptember 16, 1920[2]
10.4Charlie Paddock United StatesRedlands, USAApril 23, 1921[2]
0.0Eddie Tolan United StatesStockholm, SwedenAugust 8, 1929[2]
Copenhagen, DenmarkAugust 25, 1929[2]
10.3Percy Williams CanadaToronto, CanadaAugust 9, 1930[2]
Arthur Jonath GermanyBochum, GermanyJuly 5, 1932[3]
0.410.38Eddie Tolan United StatesLos Angeles, USAAugust 1, 1932[2]
0.410.38Ralph Metcalfe United StatesLos Angeles, USAAugust 1, 1932[3]
Ralph Metcalfe United StatesBudapest, HungaryAugust 12, 1933[2]
Eulace Peacock United StatesOslo, NorwayAugust 6, 1934[2][4]
Chris Berger NetherlandsAmsterdam, NetherlandsAugust 26, 1934[2]
Ralph Metcalfe United StatesOsaka, JapanSeptember 15, 1934[2]
2.0Dairen, ChinaSeptember 23, 1934[2]
2.5Takayoshi Yoshioka JapanTokyo, JapanJune 15, 1935[2]
10.21.2Jesse Owens United StatesChicago, USAJune 20, 1936[2]
-0.9Harold Davis United StatesCompton, USAJune 6, 1941[2]
0.7Lloyd LaBeach PanamaFresno, USAMay 15, 1948[2]
10.35Barney Ewell United StatesEvanston, United StatesJuly 9, 1948[2]
0.0McDonald Bailey Great BritainBelgrade, YugoslaviaAugust 25, 1951[2]
1.1Heinz Fütterer West GermanyYokohama, JapanOctober 31, 1954[2]
0.9Bobby Morrow United StatesHouston, USAMay 19, 1956[2]
-1.0Ira Murchison United StatesCompton, USAJune 1, 1956[2]
0.0Bobby Morrow United StatesBakersfield, USAJune 22, 1956[2]
-1.3Ira Murchison United StatesLos Angeles, USAJune 29, 1956[2]
-0.4Bobby Morrow United States
10.10.7Willie Williams United StatesBerlin, GermanyAugust 3, 1956[2]
1.0Ira Murchison United StatesBerlin, GermanyAugust 4, 1956[2]
1.5Leamon King United StatesOntario, USAOctober 20, 1956[2]
0.9Santa Ana, USAOctober 27, 1956[2]
1.3Ray Norton United StatesSan Jose, USAApril 18, 1959[2]
10.00.910.25Armin Hary West GermanyZürich, SwitzerlandJune 21, 1960[2]
1.8Harry Jerome CanadaSaskatoon, CanadaJuly 15, 1960[2]
0.0Horacio Esteves VenezuelaCaracas, VenezuelaAugust 15, 1964[2]
1.310.06Bob Hayes United StatesTokyo, JapanOctober 15, 1964[2]
2.010.17Jim Hines United StatesModesto, USAMay 27, 1967[2]
1.8Enrique Figuerola CubaBudapest, HungaryJune 17, 1967[2]
0.0Paul Nash South AfricaKrugersdorp, South AfricaApril 2, 1968[2]
1.1Oliver Ford United StatesAlbuquerque, USAMay 31, 1968[2]
2.010.20Charles Greene United StatesSacramento, USAJune 20, 1968[2]
2.010.28Roger Bambuck France
9.90.810.03Jim Hines United StatesSacramento, USAJune 20, 1968[2]
0.910.14Ronnie Ray Smith United States
0.910.10Charles Greene United States
0.39.95Jim Hines United StatesMexico City, MexicoOctober 14, 1968[2]
0.0Eddie Hart United StatesEugene, USAJuly 1, 1972[2]
0.0Rey Robinson United States
1.3Steve Williams United StatesLos Angeles, USAJune 21, 1974[2]
1.7Silvio Leonard CubaOstrava, CzechoslovakiaJune 5, 1975[2]
0.0Steve Williams United StatesSiena, ItalyJuly 16, 1975[2]
-0.2Berlin, GermanyAugust 22, 1975[2]
0.7Gainesville, USAMarch 27, 1976[2]
0.7Harvey Glance United StatesColumbia, USAApril 3, 1976[2]
Baton Rouge, USAMay 1, 1976[2]
1.7Don Quarrie JamaicaModesto, USAMay 22, 1976[2]

Records from 1977[edit]

From 1975, the IAAF accepted separate automatically electronically timed records for events up to 400 metres. Starting January 1, 1977, the IAAF required fully automatic timing to the hundredth of a second for these events.[2]

Jim Hines' October 1968 Olympic gold medal run was the fastest recorded fully electronic 100 metre race to that time, at 9.95.[2] Track and Field News has compiled an unofficial list of automatically timed records starting with the 1964 Olympics and Bob Hayes' gold medal performance there. Those marks are included in the progression.

TimeWindAutoAthleteNationalityLocation of raceDateNotes[note 1]
10.061.3Bob Hayes United StatesTokyo, JapanOctober 15, 1964[5]
10.030.8Jim Hines United StatesSacramento, USAJune 20, 1968[5]
10.022.0Charles Greene United StatesMexico City, MexicoOctober 13, 1968A[5]
9.950.3Jim Hines United StatesMexico City, MexicoOctober 14, 1968OR, A[2]
9.931.4Calvin Smith United StatesColorado Springs, USAJuly 3, 1983A[2]
9.831.0Ben Johnson CanadaRome, ItalyAugust 30, 1987[note 2]
9.931.1Carl Lewis United StatesRome, ItalyAugust 30, 1987[5][6][note 3]
1.1Zürich, SwitzerlandAugust 17, 1988[2]
9.921.1Carl Lewis United StatesSeoul, South KoreaSeptember 24, 1988OR[note 2][2]
9.901.9Leroy Burrell United StatesNew York, USAJune 14, 1991[2]
9.861.0Carl Lewis United StatesTokyo, JapanAugust 25, 1991[2]
9.851.2Leroy Burrell United StatesLausanne, SwitzerlandJuly 6, 1994[2]
9.840.79.835Donovan Bailey CanadaAtlanta, USAJuly 27, 1996OR[2][7]
9.790.1Maurice Greene United StatesAthens, GreeceJune 16, 1999[2]
9.782.0Tim Montgomery United StatesParis, FranceSeptember 14, 2002[8][note 4]
9.771.69.768Asafa Powell JamaicaAthens, GreeceJune 14, 2005[2]
1.79.766Justin Gatlin United StatesDoha, QatarMay 12, 2006[5][9][note 5]
1.59.763Asafa Powell JamaicaGateshead, EnglandJune 11, 2006[2]
1.09.762Zürich, SwitzerlandAugust 18, 2006[2]
9.741.7Asafa Powell JamaicaRieti, ItalySeptember 9, 2007[1]
9.721.7Usain Bolt JamaicaNew York, USAMay 31, 2008[2]
9.690.09.683Beijing, ChinaAugust 16, 2008OR[2]
9.580.99.572Berlin, GermanyAugust 16, 2009[1][10][11]

Low altitude record progression 1968–87[edit]

The IAAF considers marks set at high altitude as acceptable for record consideration. However, high altitude can significantly assist sprint performances.[12] One estimate suggests times in the 200m sprint can be assisted by 0.09 s to 0.14 s with the maximum allowable tailing wind (2.0 m/s), and gain 0.3 s at altitudes over 2000 m.[13] For this reason, unofficial low-altitude record lists have been compiled.

After the IAAF started to recognize only electronic times in 1977, the then-current record and subsequent record were both set at altitude. It was not until 1987 that the world record was equaled or surpassed by a low-altitude performance. The following progression of low-altitude records therefore starts with Hines's low-altitude "record" when the IAAF started to recognize only electronic timing in 1977, and continues to Lewis's low-altitude performance that equalled the high-altitude world record in 1987. (Ben Johnson's 9.95 run in 1986 and 9.83 run in 1987 are omitted.)

TimeAthleteNationalityLocation of raceDate
10.03Jim Hines [5] United StatesSacramento, USAJune 20, 1968
10.03Silvio Leonard[5] CubaHavana, CubaSeptember 13, 1977
10.02James Sanford[5] United StatesWestwood, USAMay 11, 1980
10.00Carl Lewis[5] United StatesDallas, USAMay 16, 1981
10.00Carl Lewis[5] United StatesModesto, USAMay 15, 1982
9.97Carl Lewis[5] United StatesModesto, USAMay 14, 1983
9.97Calvin Smith[5] United StatesZürich, SwitzerlandAugust 24, 1983
9.96Mel Lattany[5] United StatesAthens, USAMay 5, 1984
9.93Carl Lewis[5] United StatesRome, ItalyAugust 30, 1987

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "A" stands for records set more than 1,000 metres above sea level, "OR" stands for Olympic records
  2. ^ a b Ben Johnson's time of 9.79 on September 24, 1988 was disallowed and never ratified as a record as he tested positive for stanozolol after the race. Johnson subsequently admitted to steroid use between 1981 and 1988, and his world record of 9.83 set on August 30, 1987 was rescinded by the IAAF Council in September 1989.(Track and Field News, November 1989, vol. 42, #11, p. 37)
  3. ^ Carl Lewis's two performances at 9.93 were deemed by the IAAF to have equalled the world record after Ben Johnson's 9.83 time was rescinded, but were never ratified as world records; Lewis's 9.92, his gold-medal winning time at the Seoul Olympics after Johnson was disqualified, was recognized as the world record from January 1, 1990.
  4. ^ Tim Montgomery's time of 9.78 from September 14, 2002 was rescinded following disqualification for banned drug use; a ruling in 2005 on his involvement with BALCO scandal also rescinded all records and medals from 2001 onwards. By that time, however, it had been surpassed by Asafa Powell.[1]
  5. ^ Justin Gatlin was briefly credited with a new world record time of 9.76. The IAAF announced five days later that the official timers, Tissot Timing, had discovered that time was incorrect as Gatlin's time was 9.766 and had erroneously been rounded down to the nearest hundredth instead of rounded up. This time instead made Gatlin co-world record holder with Asafa Powell.[2] However, in 2007 this record was rescinded following Gatlin's failed doping test.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "IAAF World Championships: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Daegu 2011." (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2011. pp. Pages 595, 596. Archived from the original on November 23, 2012. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 547. Archived from the original on November 23, 2012. Retrieved July 29, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b "Photographs and pictures of". Sporting Heroes. Retrieved 2010-06-07. 
  4. ^ http://www.si.com/longform/peacock/index.html This source gives a pretty articulate timeline that has Peacock achieving the record on the same date in 1935 and specifies Basel, Swizerland
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Stat Corner: 100 WR Progression". Track & Field News 61 (7): 55. July 2008. 
  6. ^ Track and Field News, November 1989, vol. 42, #11, p. 37
  7. ^ http://myweb.lmu.edu/jmureika/track/splits/splits.html#96og
  8. ^ "100m World Record falls to Montgomery - 9.78!". IAAF. 14 September 2002. Retrieved 2008-09-03. 
  9. ^ Frank Litsky (May 18, 2006). "Gatlin Must Share 100-Meter Record". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-09-03. 
  10. ^ "12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics - Berlin 2009 - Bolt again! 9.58 World record in Berlin!". Berlin.iaaf.org. 2009-08-16. Retrieved 2010-06-07. 
  11. ^ "World records set at Berlin World Championships have been ratified". iaaf.org. 2009-09-30. Retrieved 2010-06-07. 
  12. ^ "Effect of wind speed and altitude on sprint times". www.brianmac.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-04-28. 
  13. ^ "IngentaConnect Modeling wind and altitude effects in the 200 m sprint". www.ingentaconnect.com. Retrieved 2010-05-28.