McNulty

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McNulty
Family name
Meaning"descended of the Ulaid Nation"
Region of originIreland
Language(s) of originGaeilge
Related namesMcAnulty, Donlevy, Dunleavy, Garvey, McKinley (surname)
 
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McNulty
Family name
Meaning"descended of the Ulaid Nation"
Region of originIreland
Language(s) of originGaeilge
Related namesMcAnulty, Donlevy, Dunleavy, Garvey, McKinley (surname)

McNulty (MacNulty)[1] is an Irish surname historically associated with County Donegal[2] in northwest Ireland and, possibly, with the moniker Ultach, an agnomen (additional surname) used by some of Gaelic Ireland's MacDunleavy or MacDonlevy (dynasty) royals in its earlier Gaelic language form. The surname denotes that its bearer is of the ancient Irish Ulaid race (singl. Ultaigh). In alternate spelling, Ulaid may be encountered as Ulaidh or Uladh. It is pronounced in Gaelic language "Ully" and has been corrupted in English to "ulty".[3]

The surname is derived from an anglicized contraction of the original Irish patronymic Mac (descended)[4][5] an Ultaigh[6][7][8] or confusion of the Irish "Mac an Ultaigh" (male) and "Nic an Ultaigh" (female) surname.[9] Variant spellings include McNaulty,[10] its variations McNalty[11] and, rarely, O'Nalty,[12] Nolty,[13][14] McNult,[15][16] the more primitive Anglicizations McAnulty,[17][18] McEnulty and McKnulty[19][20] and others.

In County Clare and its adjacent County Tipperary in the southwest of the Republic of Ireland, the toponymics Connoulty and Kinoulty are encountered. Clonoulty (Irish language "Cluain Ultaigh", meaning "the meadow of the Ulsterman" or Ultaigh) is a civil parish in south County Tipperary. Some sources consider the surnames Connoulty and Kinoulty to be variant Anglicizations of the Irish language Mac and Nic an Ultaigh surname.[21][22]

The surname McNulty and any of its variations[23][24] may be encountered sans their mac or mc prefix.[25][26][27] Accordingly, some persons of this surname and their namesakes may be found alphabeted instead of at "M" at "N", "O" and even "U". Capitalization and spacing are inconsistent following either prefix.[28][29] Mac appears in anglicized contraction not only as Mc (also written Mc), but, even, M'.[30][31]

Alphabetization of variants[edit]

In researching persons of the McNulty surname or its variants, where either the Mac, Mc or M' prefix has been employed to form such Anglicization of the Irish Mac or Nic an Ultaigh surname, also note that British text sources consistently place all surnames beginning with both the prefixes "Mac" and "Mc" at the alphabetical position of "Mac", as the English language "Mc" is simply the Irish language "Mac", anglicized by contraction. Depending on the particular American text source (United States or Canadian), it may follow the British convention or it may place all surnames beginning with the prefix "Mac" separately from surnames beginning with the prefix "Mc" at the alphabetical position of "Mac" and all surnames beginning with "Mc", instead, at the subsequent alphabetical position of "Mc".[32] Surnames beginning with the even further abbreviated prefix M' are consistently placed at the alphabetical position of "Mac" in both British and American reference sources.[33]

Meaning and heritage[edit]

Map shows colored in orange and green the entirety of Ireland's original Ulster or Ulaid province, the namesake of the Irish Ulaid. 6 modern Ulster counties of Northern Ireland are in Orange. 3 modern Ulster counties of the Republic of Ireland are in green.

The Irish surname Mac (literally, son)[34] and Nic (literally, daughter)[35] an Ultaigh (Anglicized Mac or Mc Nulty), actually, means in English "descended of the Ulaid Nation" or people.[36] When an element of a Gaelic patronymic, "son" is in its usage of "Though that I unworthy sone of Eve be synful ...", that is "descended".[37][38] Mac and Nic an Ultaigh and its many Anglicizations may, also, though, be encountered without further elaboration in more ambivalently obscured and, likely, inadvertently, gender biased English translation as simply "son of an Ulsterman "[39] or "Ulidian".[2][40] The Gaelic Mac and Nic an Ultaigh and its many Anglicizations may also be encountered in even still looser English translation as "(from or) native of Eastern Ulster".[40][41]

In any of these translations, though, the surname McNulty connotes that its bearer is descended from the Ulaid, a nation of people, that is the ancient Irish Uluti tribe, which dynasties in remote times ruled the entirety of the North of Ireland.[42] The "Ulaid", "Ulaidh" or "Ultaigh" (anglcized or corrupted "Nulty") are actually equated in English translation to "Ulsterites or an Ulsterite" and their former territory of the "Ulaidh (province)" is equated in English translation to "Ulster",[43] because the Ulaid in remote times so occupied roughly the land of the 9 modern counties, which are Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh, Coleraine (now Londonderry), Tyrone, Cavan, Donegal and Monaghan, of historic Ulster province in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.[44][45] The English word Ulster, itself, is the Irish word Ulaid anglicized with the English possessive ending -s and Irish tír (Ulaidh's tír) to designate the "land" or "territory" of the Ulaid, in other words, the Irish Ulaidh (province).[46][47] In addition to being fierce land warriors, the Ulaid were also known for a formidable seafaring navy.[48][49][50]

From their seat at Emain Macha, the dynasties of the Ulaid or Ulaidh first ruled all of the historic province of Ulster, that is the Ulaidh (province) as a sovereign state or in Irish language their "tuath" (literally, "the commonality")[51] from sometime between the 10th and 17th century BC[52][53] and after the 5th-century AD encroachments of the adversary Uí Néill, successively, smaller portions, thereof, until the last remnants of their state, then called Ulidia, substantially dissolved in the late 12th century AD.[54]

The dynasties of the Ulaid and their territory remaining after the 5th century AD were the Dál Riata in the glens of the land area of the modern County of Antrim in eastern Ulster and later, also, Scotland, the Dál nAraidi in the area of modern Belfast in eastern Ulster and the Dál Fiatach in the land area of the modern Diocese of Down and Connor in eastern Ulster.[45]

Ancient Gael royal connection[edit]

This is a map of Gaelic Ireland circa 900 A.D. The map area labeled Ulaid (nation) is the Kingdom of Ulidia. The map area labeled Northern Uí Néill is the Kingdom of Tir Chonaill. By the time that the Kingdom of Ulidia fell to the English in the late 12th century, the Kingdom of Tir Chonaill had expanded to include the northern portion of the Kingdom of Ulidia shown on this map.

There are variant etymologies proposed for McNulty. In large measure, however, all of these hold that the surname McNulty evolved from the Irish surnames of ancient Gael royals of southeastern Ulster or from Irish nicknames given them. Some McNulty are of the Ultonian royal house that produced kings of the Ulidia sub-kingdom of (modern) Iveagh and some McNulty may be of the Ultonian royal house that produced the last line of over-kings of the Ulaid (nation) and the Kingdom of Ulidia.

As persons of a surname originating in southeastern Ulster's Ulidia (kingdom), by any scenario posed by scholars, the McNulty are descended of the Red Branch royal houses of the Dál Fiatach group of the Ulaid dynasties, which include also the house of MacDonlevy (Irish Mac or Ó Duinnshléibhe),[55] which produced the line of royals, who last ruled all the Ulaid as their over-kings. As persons of a surname originating either within or without southeastern Ulster, it is debated whether some McNulty are also descended of the MacDonlevy royal house, itself. As all the other Dál Fiatach dynasties, members of both the clanna MacDonlevy and McNulty claim descent from Fiatach Finn mac Dáire, a King of Ulster and High King of Ireland in the 1st century A.D., after whose reign the Dál Fiatach dominated the kingship of Ulster, and through him and the Heremon line of Irish kings, as many of the other royalty of the British Isles, to the Milesian Irish King Heremon, himself, and through Heremon to his father the legendary c.-15th-century BC Iberno-Celts king Mil Espaine or Miles Hispaniae (Latinized Milesius of Spain, "victor of a thousand battles"), King of Galicia (Spain), Andalusia, Murcia, Castile (historical region) and Portugal.[56]

There are two scholarly proposals for the origin of the McNulty surname in Ulidia (kingdom) in extreme southeastern Ulster. The McNulty are of the Kingdom's Red Branch royal houses, in their line that later includes the O'Garvey, or the McNulty are of the Cú Uladh sept of the MacDonlevy branch of the Kingdom's Red Branch royal houses.

In the context of a distinct clan[57] (I. "clanna"),[58] John O'Hart traces the McNulty to the Dál Fiatach group of Ulaid dynasties, who were the last rulers of the Ulaid nation of people and their, by then, greatly reduced Ulahd (province), called Ulidia (kingdom), and to the branching of its O'Garvey royals. In contrast to the entirety of the land area of the original Ulster province, the "lesser Ulahd province" or Ulidia (kingdom) of this time comprised a much smaller, though still large land area, concurrent with that of only one of Ulster province's 9 modern counties, that is County Down, and the southern portion of a second of its modern counties, which is County Antrim. The McNulty (parent house) and O'Garvey (descended house) ruled in this Ulidia (kingdom) the largest of its sub-kingdoms, which substantial land area in the west of County Down was concurrent with the land area of what is today Northern Ireland's district or Barony (Ireland) of Iveagh (I. "Eachach Cobha" or older "Magh Cobha"), occupying much of the southern and western part of modern County Down.[59][60] These Dál Fiatach kings were the Red Branch royal houses that ruled Ulidia (kingdom) for half a millennium until its fall in the late 12th century. Ulidia (kingdom), the last patrimony of the Ulaid nation, substantially collapsed, then, following John de Courcy's, his 800 armored English footroops' and 22 mounted armored cavalry's defeat of the Ulidians or Ultonians at Downpatrick in 1177 A .D.[61] The cultural shock of the loss of their ancient administrative center and sacred religious site at Downpatrick (I. "Dùn Phádraig", L. "Dunum") to de Courcy and the English caused, too, the already centuries diminished Ulaid race to in short order, thereafter, cease to exist as a cohesive people.

Some McNulty may, though, too, be traced directly to the MacDonlevy house of the royalty of Ulidia by virtue of a nickname there given the MacDonlevy. In one highly unusual translation of the surname McNulty, it is actually and seemingly oddly translated through its variant Naulty to mean in English "wild Ulidian dog" or hound (noted at reference to be from Gaelic "Cuallaidh").[62] This peculiar translation is, though, a reference to the battle famed Cú – Uladh MacDunnshleibhe (fl. c. 1177) (Latinized "Canis Ultoniae" or English "the Ulidian hound"), who was the nephew of Rory, the 54th Christian and last king of a viable Ulaid (province) (again, English Ulster and Latinized Ultonia and then being the reduced Ulidia (kingdom)).[63][64] The chieftain Cú-Ulahd was noted to be as swift footed in combat as the feared Irish Wolf Hound, that the MacDonlevy and/or McNulty took to battle for successful purpose including the dismounting of their opponents the English's armored cavalry. Nalty and Nulty are variants of Naulty.

Red Branch houses[edit]

Hence, according to manifold researchers,[65][66] the namesake of Ulster or it their namesake and in ancient Irish lore claimed descended of the mythological Irish heroes of the Red Branch or Ulster Cycle,[67] the McNulty as a parent house in the branch line leading to the O'Garveys or through the Donlevy house's Cú-Ulahd are also as Irish rulers last of historic record among Ulster's Red Branch royal houses (Irish, the "Craobh Ruadh") of the Kingdom of Ulidia, that is of the "rigdamnai" of that portion of Ireland of the legendary earthen mound building Red Branch Knights of Ulster[68] for whom Constance Markievicz, originally, named the Irish patriot organization "Na Fianna Éireann".[69]

MacDonlevy royals in exile[edit]

Finally, some McNulty may, otherwise, be MacDonlevy or of other septs displaced from Ulidia (kingdom). Sources besides O'Hart state that the clanna Mac an Ultaigh, its septs and its Anglicization Mac or McNulty evolved during the middle age without the area of the Kingdom of Ulidia, which was again located in the extreme southeast of Ulster province. They contend that the surname first appeared, instead, in the Kingdom of Tirconnell, which is located in the northwest of Ulster province, which is a portion of Ulster that for centuries thereto had not been the territory of the Ulaid. Ancient Tirconnell (I. Tir Chonaill or the land of the O'Donnell) had a land area roughly concurrent with that of the modern County Donegall in the Republic of Ireland.[70][71][72]

Two sources, P. McNulty and E. Neafsey, go so far as to propose that the McNulty are not by that name an actual Irish clanna at all and that the Irish surname Mac or Nic an Ultaigh and, therefore, remotely, its Anglicization Mac or McNulty, arises from an Irish language nickname given during the Middle Ages only to persons who relocated to other portions of Ireland, most notably, again, Tirconnell, from the area of the former Kingdom of Ulidia in extreme southeastern Ulster after its fall. This Irish nickname was "Ultach",[73] in variant spellings also "Ultagh", "Ultaig", "Ultaigh" and "Ultacháin" (English Ulsterman or Ulsterite), the singular of the Gaelic "Ulaid", "Ulaidh" or "Uladh" and English "Ulsterites"[3][74][75] and Latinized "Ultonian" or "Ulidian",[76][77] for a member of the Uluti tribe, that is the Ulaid Nation or people. P. McNulty, among other of his supporting arguments, states first under section "Early Ulster (Ulaid, Ulidia, Ultonia) … McNultys (Mac an Ultaigh) … the name was applied only to those who had left early Ulster.", then at section "Origin of Names" … "McNulty (Mac an Ultaigh, son of the Ulsterman), which is based on the location of their ancestors in early Ulster and their subsequent departure from that location (Appendix 1, p 17)." and, later, "McNulty name was applied only to those Gaelic families who fled Down after 1177 (Table 4, Appendix 4, p 18)".[78] E. Neafsey concurs in measure, while in citing to Woulfe, infra, noting "Woulfe describes MacNulty as a Donegal family …".[2]

Notably, the nickname "Ultach" was given by the indigenous populations of the western Ireland Kingdom of Tirconnell, the last standing Gaelic sovereignty and stronghold, to the MacDonlevy royalty[79] upon their arrival in flight there[80] after the substantial fall[81] of their eastern Ireland Kingdom of Ulidia at Downpatrick in 1177. As stated in the now out of copyright year 1893 Dictionary of National Biography, "As the family originally came from Ulidia, the lesser Uladh, or Ulster, the members of it are often called in Irish writings, instead of MacDonlevy, Ultach, that is Ulsterman, and from this the name McNulty, Mac an Ultaigh, son of the Ulsterman is derived."[82] Ultaigh and Ultagh are variant spellings of I. Ultach for an individual of the Ulaid nation or race. Ultach is anglicized to Ulsterite and from L. Ultonii to Ultonian or Ulidian.[3] To a historical certainty, the MacDonlevy royalty did adopt this nickname Ultach as an agnomen (additional surname), while in asylum in Tir after their 1177 defeat by the forces of de Courcy named to the high Gaelic status of "ollahm leighis" or the official physicians to the O'Donnells dynasty Kings of Tirconnell (variant spelling Tyrconnell and sometimes abbreviated "Tir").[83] The MacDonlevy were the last line of historical Kings of Ulster and the Dál Fiatach, which thrones were actually restricted to this family's lineage after 1137.[84][85] The MacDonlevy (again, anglicized from Gaelic language Mac or Ó Duinnshléibhe) were, also, one of the ancient hereditary medical families of Ireland.[86]

Emigration[edit]

Belfast's reminder of "An Gorta Mór", the Great Famine (Ireland) or the genocide by starvation
The wrenching parting of Henry Doyle's 1868 Emmigrant's Leave Ireland

Some of the first McNulty immigrants to North America arrived in Philadelphia and New York City in the very early 19th century[87][88][89] and, later, more numerously, in both Philadelphia and New York City between 1840 and 1860, during which period the great Irish Potato Famine occurred.[90][91] By 1980, there were 19,469 persons surnamed McNulty in the United States Social Security Administration data base. The surname McNulty was, then, the 2332 most frequently occurring surname in that database.[15] There are an estimated 421 persons surnamed McNulty in Australia.[92]

Remaining frequency in United Kingdom[edit]

In Great Britain the surname McNulty is shared by an estimated 7,888 people and is approximately the 1329th most popular surname in the country.[93]

In modern history and contemporary affairs[edit]

Whatever their true appellation, persons surnamed McNulty, who as earlier noted, number no more than a few tens of thousands of the hundreds of millions in the English speaking world, include, modernly, a significant number of noteworthy individuals. Among these persons are venerated Irish nationalists, prominent statesmen, top level national and provincial government officials, famed entertainers, combat distinguished U.S. and/or British naval and army commanders, numerous other distinguished U.S., British, Australian and Canadian war heroes, Roman Catholic Church prelates and celebrated professional and amateur sports figures. In the U.S., persons of this surname also have an illustrious tradition as academics, in U.S. naval and martial history and, throughout the world, as journalists and in literature and the theatre. Persons surnamed McNulty are, too, less, but, still notably, visual artists, musical composers, instrument makers, engineers and inventors, pioneering computer scientists and technologists, intelligence operatives, jurists, chief executives of major corporations and/or financial exchanges, beauty pageant winners and in cinema.

Some notable people[edit]

Dennis Day (1916–1988)
Dennis Day 1960.JPG
Dennis Day, the stage name of crooner, comic and radio and television personality Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty
Poster for Blondie Takes a Vacation (1939), starring Penny Singleton (1908–2003), the stage name of motion picture actress and radio personality Marianna Dorothy Agnes Letitia McNulty
Dr. Sir Arthur MacNalty (sometimes, McNalty) (1880–1969) was the 8th Chief Medical Officer (United Kingdom) (1935–1941) and a historian. A ground breaking medical scientist, he teamed with the Welshman Thomas Lewis (cardiologist) in 1908 to demonstrate that tracings from then nascent electrocardiography (ECG) could be used as a tool for diagnosing Heart block.[94] This use of electrocardiography to diagnose heart block was the earliest application of ECG technology in cardiology and clinical medicine. Above is an illustration of a turn-of-the-20th-century laboratory set up of the string galvanometer for the taking of an electrocardiograph. Many of Sir Arthur's histories, including his Henry VIII: The Difficult Patient (1952) and Mary, Queen of Scots: The Daughter of Debate (1960), remain relevant for scholars. At the behest of his friend Winston Churchill, Sir Arthur also served as editor-in-chief for compilation of the monumental over 20 volume Official Medical History of the Second World War (1968).
Interior courtyard of Boston City Hall, a building called in an AIA survey one of the ten proudest achievements of American architecture in the Nation's first 200 years, Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, whose principals were Nelson Aldrich (architect) and Lawrence Frederick Nulty, architects

Fictional characters[edit]

Thelma Ritter (1902–1969), as Ellen McNulty
Thelma Ritter in The Mating Season trailer.jpg
from the trailer for The Mating Season (1951)
The motion picture actor Ray Milland, here, portraying Don Birnam in The Lost Weekend (1945), later, portrayed Prof. Ray McNulty in the early 1950s TV series Meet Mr. McNulty.

20th and 21st century U.S. Representatives[edit]

Capitol dome
Frank Joseph McNulty
William Brodhead
Michael R. McNulty

Roman Catholic Bishops[edit]

In U.S. nautical and naval history[edit]

Notable naval personnel and mariners[edit]

This is an aerial view of United States Merchant Marine Academy. Then Commodore Robert R. McNulty, the Supervisor of the Merchant Marine Cadet Corps, founded the Academy during the Second World War and served as its third superintendent. The Kings Point, New York campus grew from a 12-acre property that was once the waterfront estate of Walter Chrysler. The estate's main house, "Forker House", is now the Academy's Wiley Hall.
This is the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. The College was established in 1884. The College is the U.S. Navy research and educational institution charged with developing and disseminating to its officers new methods of naval warfare. Rear Admiral (then Captain) James F. McNulty was the institutions Chief of Staff in the 1970s. McNulty was particularly knowledgeable in the area of anti-submarine warfare. After his retirement from the U.S. Navy, Rear Admiral James F. McNulty became the Superintendent of the Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Michigan.

"Acta Non Verba" ("Deeds Not Words"), the motto of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, founded 1943

Ships & their namesakes[edit]

USS McNulty (DE-581) National Archives

The USS McNulty (DE-581) was a World War II escort destroyer named for Lt. (j.g.) John Thomas McNulty of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (born 23 April 1897), a 24-year naval veteran, who died in combat in World War II while serving on the USS Astoria (CA-34) during the Battle of Savo Island on 9 August 1942.[106][107] The U.S.S. McNulty was sponsored by his widow[108] Helen K. McNulty, and, thereafter, received two battle stars for World War II service.

A Rudderow class destroyer escort, the USS McNulty was laid down on 17 November 1943. When launched on 8 January 1944, the USS McNulty (DE-581) had a length from stern through keel of 306 feet and a displacement of 1450 tons. Her beam was 36 feet and 10 inches, and she had a draft of 9 feet and 8 inches. She had 16 guns, 3 torpedo tubes, 8 depth charge throwers, 2 depth charge racks and 1 Hedgehog depth bomb thrower. Her compliment was 186 men. Her speed was 24 knots.

A completion photograph of the vessel in waters outside Boston Navy Yard on 5 April 1944 appears at section right.

Navy Cross recipients[edit]

Navycross.jpg For "Extraordinary heroism in combat not justifying the Medal of Honor" - the second highest medal of valor awarded to members of the U.S. Navy and its U.S. Marine Corps

U.S. naval recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross[edit]

Distinguished Service Cross (United States) For "Distinguishes himself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the Medal of Honor" - a second highest medal of valor that may be awarded U.S. Marines

U.S. naval recipients of the Distinguished Flying Cross[edit]

Dfc-usa.jpg For "Heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in an actual flight"

U.S. naval Silver Star recipients[edit]

Silver Star medal.png For "gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States"

Duke University war memorial[edit]

US Navy Ensign (rank) Frank Bacon McNulty, Jr., the son of Dr. and Mrs. Frank Bacon McNulty, Sr., 223 Cathedral Mansions, Ellsworth Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and a class of '43 Duke University alumnus, who fell in naval action during World War II[122][123]

In U.S. Army history[edit]

Notable World War II field commanders[edit]

Notable U.S. Civil War field commanders[edit]

Notable Mexican-American War field commanders[edit]

U.S. Army recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross[edit]

Distinguished Service Cross (United States) For "Distinguishes himself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the Medal of Honor" - the second highest medal for valor awarded to members of the U.S. Army

Prisoners on the march from Bataan to the prison camp, May 1942. (National Archives).

U.S. Army Silver Star recipients[edit]

Silver Star medal.png For "gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States"

Missing in action[edit]

F-80Cs of the 8th Fighter-Bomber Group Korean War

US Armed Forces recipients of the Legion of Merit[edit]

Legionnaire of the Legion of Merit.jpg For "Exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements"

Buried at Arlington National Cemetery[edit]

In U.S. military intelligence service and U.S. intelligence operations[edit]

The CIA Memorial Wall with 83 stars. One of these stars honors Wayne J. McNulty.
The CIA Book of Honor for 1950–2005, with entries corresponding to the Wall. The 5th entry down in the second column of the open page on the reader's left is for the 1968 death of Wayne J. McNulty.

On CIA Memorial Wall[edit]

"In Honor of those Members of the Central Intellegence Agency Who Gave Their Lives in the Service of Their Country"

103 stars representing Central Intellegence Agency (CIA) agents who died in service of their country are carved into the Memorial's white Vermont marble on the north wall of the original CIA headquarters building. One of these stars honors CIA operative Wayne J. McNulty, paramilitary Special Activities Division, National Clandestine Service (responsible for covert operations), who died in action in 1968 in South Vietnam or Laos.[180]

World War II and post World War II Heroes of British and Commonwealth forces[edit]

Citation:

"On the 11th May, 1969 a platoon of A Company was pinned down in a heavy contact against an enemy battalion headquarters position. The platoon commander was seriously wounded ten yards in front of the enemy position and could not be extracted despite several frontal attacks. Sergeant McNulty, leading eleven men, made repeated attempts over a period of five hours to outflank the enemy and assault from the rear. Each attempt was met by heavy and accurate rocket, claymore, and machine gun fire. Despite the risk of almost certain death or wounding, Sergeant McNulty could not be deterred in his efforts to rescue the platoon commander. He finally succeeded in getting himself and a soldier with a flame thrower into a position from which effective fire could be delivered into the enemy long enough to achieve the recovery of the officer.
"In July, 1969, Sergeant McNulty was an adviser with a company of the Army of The Republic of Vietnam. The company came under sudden and heavy attack from an enemy company. The violence of the initial enemy rocket and machine gun fire caused seven casualties and created confusion amongst the friendly troops. Without regard for his own safety Sergeant McNulty advised and assisted the company commander in the organisation of his defences and the collection and evacuation of the wounded. As the enemy attack intensified Sergeant McNulty called for and calmly directed for several hours helicopter gunships and artillery, forcing the enemy to withdraw. His personal courage and professional advice was responsible for saving the South Vietnamese troops from further severe casualties and the possibility of being overrun by the enemy assault.
"In August, 1969, Sergeant McNulty's platoon was engaged in two separate major contacts with superior size enemy forces entrenched in bunkers. On both occasions Sergeant McNulty inspired all ranks with his aggressiveness and courage which by now had become expected of him in all contacts with the enemy. On 21 August 1969 while attacking an enemy battalion position, over fifteen members of his platoon including Sergeant McNulty were wounded. Sergeant McNulty covered the withdrawal of other members of his platoon, assisted in their evacuation and was finally wounded a second time during his own evacuation.
"Sergeant McNulty's outstanding conduct and personal courage has been inspirational to all members of his battalion and to South Vietnamese allies. His exemplary actions reflect great credit on himself, The Royal Australian Regiment and the Australian Army."[181]
Citation: "On the night of 10/11 December 1952, Sergeant McNulty commanded the reserve section and the assault pioneer group of the force which assaulted enemy positions on 'Flora' (CT 161208). As the force approached the objective it came under heavy enemy small arms and grenade fire. It quickly became apparent that the enemy holding the position was in far greater strength than anticipated. Sergeant McNulty's force was immediately committed in a mopping-up role. With his small party he searched for and located many enemy shelters and bunkers, inflicting casualties and serious material damage on the enemy. It was due to his energetic and courageous action during this period that many enemy posts, which had been bypassed in the initial assault, were destroyed, thus keeping friendly casualties to a minimum. As his force cleared the objective, an enemy machine-gun opened up, wounding one man. Sergeant McNulty helped to move the wounded man to safety but, in doing so, was struck by a bullet, which was fortunately deflected by his armored jacket. With complete disregard for his own safety and despite being shaken by his near miss, he personally assaulted the position with grenades and killed the crew. He then began the collection of wounded in the area, moving freely through the enemy defensive fire that was now beginning to fall. When the order for the withdrawal was given, Sergeant McNulty checked his troops through and waited until all had cleared the position before he himself withdrew from the area. Through his personal courage and disregard for his own safety he significantly contributed to maintaining the momentum of the assault. He set a splendid example to his men and infused them with a determination which contributed largely to the success of the operation."[182][183]

Died valorously in action[edit]

Places & their namesakes[edit]

This is a nighttime view of McNulty Hall, which is Seton Hall University's Technology and Research Center. The famed "Atom Wall" mural, depicting God, gifting scientific knowledge to man, can be viewed in the building's atrium. McNulty Hall also houses an observatory and large amphitheater.
The McAnulty School of Liberal Arts building at Duquesne University.

McNulty rhyolite[edit]

Found in a single location on the earth's surface, that is McNulty Gulch near Leadville Colorado, McNulty rhyolite is a comparatively rare gem rock quality variety of rhyolite rock. McNulty rhyolite appears in the official U.S. Department of Interior, United States Geological Survey Lexicon of Geological Names of the United States.[195]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 128, 319
  2. ^ a b c Neafsey, Edward (2002). The Surnames of Ireland: Origins and Numbers of Selected Irish Surnames. Irish Roots. p. 168. ISBN 9780940134973. 
  3. ^ a b c G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  4. ^ See,Adolph, Anthony (2010). Collins Tracing Your Irish Family History. HarperCollins. p. 232. ISBN 9780007360956. , noting that the Mac prefix element of a Gaelic patronymic surname or clan name (see Anthony, ibid, p. 230) is not actually the Gaelic word Mac, meaning son, but, is a shortened form of the original pre-11th-century Gaelic prefix "mac meic" meaning "the son of the son of … etc."
  5. ^ 11th Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Merriam Webster's, Inc., © 2003, 2004, p. 1189, this less common English usage of son to which "Mac" properly translates when used as the element of a Gaelic patronymic is "son … 3 : a person closely associated with or deriving from a formative agent (as a nation, school or race)
  6. ^ Dictionary of American Family Names, Vol. 2 G-N, Oxford, Oxford University Press, © 2003, ISBN 0-19-516558-6 (Vol. 2), p 560
  7. ^ [1] Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down, Appendix 1, by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker.
  8. ^ The World Book Dictionary, in 2 volumes, Volume 2 (L-Z), Chicago, World Book, Inc., © 2005, ISBN 978-0-7166-0201-9 (set), ISBN 0-7166-0201-6 (set), p. 1528 (pertaining to Mac element only) "patronymic … a name derived from name of paternal ancestor, especially by addition of a prefix … (usage example) MacDonald meaning ‘descendant of Donald' …"
  9. ^ [2] Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker. Prof. McNulty, under subtitle "Migration of the Dunleavys From County Down" states "This (m'Nich Ultagh) presumably was further transformed to Mac an Ultaigh because the British had confused the female prefix, Nic/Nich., with the male prefix, Mac (Appendix 3, p 19)." Appendix 3 noting the confusion of the Irish Mac and Nic prefixes for Mac an Ultaigh and Nic an Ultaigh on the 1601 Elizabethan pardon of one Morris m'Nich Ultagh, which is Fiant number 6494, is sourced at footnote 69.
  10. ^ P. Hanks and F. Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames, Oxford, Oxford University Press, ©1988, ISBN 0-19-211592-8, p 367
  11. ^ P. Hanks and F. Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames, Oxford, Oxford University Press, ©1988, ISBN 0-19-211592-8, p 366
  12. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 356 (anglicized from Irish "Ónultaċáin", at Mac Duinnshléibhe) See example record for a Patrick O'Nalty (1820–1890) of Mayo, Ireland (d. Louisville, Kentucky U.S.A.), the son of Thomas Nalty (1849–1884) and the father of John and Michael Nalty [3] As additional example, see July 28, 2005 Hartford (Connecticut) Courant obituary for one Anna O'Nalty of Atlanta, Georgia and family members listed therein [4]
  13. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 141
  14. ^ Elsdon C. Smith New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row (1956, 1973) p 373, not to be confused with the German originated Nolte meaning descended of Arnold, eagle, ruler
  15. ^ a b Encyclopedia of American Family Names, H. Robb and A. Chesler, © 1995, New England Publishing Associates, Inc. (Harper Collins) ISBN 0-06-27005-8, p. 488
  16. ^ Elsdon C. Smith New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row (1956, 1973) p 375 (as to Null & McNutt); Dictionary of American Family Names, P. Hanks, ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press (2003) Vol. 2, p 560 (as to McNutt only), not to be confused with "Null", a surname of Irish origin meaning dweller on or near a hill or "McNutt", an anglicized form of a rare Gaelic language surname, Mac Naudhat, meaning son of Naudha, an ancient Celtic sea deity, also may be a reduction of MacNaughton, a surname of Scottish origin
  17. ^ Dictionary of American Family Names, Vol 2 G-N, Oxford, Oxford University Press © 2003 ISBN 0-19-516558-6 (Vol. 2), p 543
  18. ^ Neafsey, Edward (2002), The Surnames of Ireland: Origins and Numbers of Selected Irish Surnames, Irish Roots, p. 168, a surname population study by an urban planner with 1 of its pages relevant to the surname McNulty and, thereat, containing some surname history, which is all derivative from the Irish scholar Patrick Woulfe's earlier work, noting McAnulty variant is today rare "The early anglicized form of MacAnulty accounts for 6%."
  19. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 125, 319
  20. ^ P. Hanks and F. Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames, Oxford, Oxford University Press, ©1988, ISBN 0-19-211592-8, p 361
  21. ^ [5] (Mac) Connoulty
  22. ^ [6] Kinoulty
  23. ^ See Dictionary of American Family Names, P. Hanks editor, Vol. 2, Oxford, Oxford University Press, © Patrick Hanks, ISBN 0-19-516558-6 (Vol. 2) p. 652 at "Naulty", which is there noted to be reduced from McNaulty and p. 683 at "Nulty", which is there noted to have been reduced from McNulty
  24. ^ See also Elsdon C. Smith New Dictionary of American Surnames © 1956, 1973 New York: Harper and Row Publishers, p 366 at Nalty, which is there noted to be a variation of Naulty
  25. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 319 "… MacNulty … It is now common in Mayo and Meath. In the latter county, it is always angl. Nulty." See also "Nolty" and "Nulty" at pp. 141-142.
  26. ^ Edward MacLysaght, Irish Families – Their Names, Arms and Origins, © 1972 Allen Figgis and Co. Ltd., in U.S.A., New York, Crown Publishers, Inc. p. 244 "MacNULTY … The name is also found in Co. Meath but usually it is shorn of its prefix Mac there."
  27. ^ Neafsey, Edward (2002), The Surnames of Ireland: Origins and Numbers of Selected Irish Surnames, Irish Roots, p. 168, states that families who have dropped the Mac or Mc prefix account for 13% of all families in Ireland otherwise surnamed Mac or Mc Nulty.
  28. ^ See John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 2, where "Mac Nulty" at page 908 of the volume's "Index of Sirnames" appears with a space between its Mac prefix and Nulty but referencing to the unspaced "MacNulty, Donegal", "MacNulty, Cavan", "MacNulty, Mayo" at p. 9 of the volume under subtitle "Families of Ireland".
  29. ^ See, The Famine Immigrants - Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York, 1846–1851, in multiple volumes, Ira A. Glazier, editor, © 1983 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., ISBN 0-8063-1024-3, Vol. 1 (January 1846 – June 1847), where at p. 49 "Mcnulty" appears alternately without its N capitalized after the prefix Mac.
  30. ^ The New Century Dictionary of the English Language, H. G. Emery and K. G. Brewster, ed., New York, The Century Co., © 1927, 1929, P.F. Collier & Son Co., New York sole distributor, Vol. 2 leaver – stone, p. 994
  31. ^ See, also, John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, where M'Nulty appears at p. 912 in the volumes "Index of Sirnames" but referencing to at p. 814 of its "List of officers in Meagher's Irish Brigade", which is there noted to have fought in the U.S. Civil War at least at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, "Officers: … McNulty, Owen … (full) Lieutenant … 69th New York Volunteers" (father of U.S. Representative and labor leader Frank Joseph McNulty).
  32. ^ Fowler's Modern English Usage, 3rd edition by R.W. Burchfield, Oxford, Oxford University Press, © 1968, 1996, revised 3rd edition 1998, reissued with title change 2004, p. 474
  33. ^ The Columbia Viking Desk Encyclopedia, 3rd edition, © 1968 New York, New York, Viking Press, Inc., in 2 volumes, Vol. 2, "M'" at p. 640, also, at p. 640, "Mac" … "Mac, Mc, or M' [Irish=son], element in names derived from Irish or Scottish Gaelic patronymics. … It is untrue that some forms of the prefix are typically Scottish or Irish. In this book all names beginning with any of the three forms are alphabeted as Mac-."
  34. ^ 4th MacEachen's Gaelic-English Dictionary, Inverness, The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, 1922, p. 280
  35. ^ 4th MacEachen's Gaelic-English Dictionary, Inverness, The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, 1922, p. 309
  36. ^ The World Book Dictionary, in 2 volumes, Volume 2 (L-Z), Chicago, World Book, Inc., © 2005, ISBN 978-0-7166-0201-9 (set), ISBN 0-7166-0201-6 (set), p. 1528 "patronymic … a name derived from name of paternal ancestor, especially by addition of a prefix … (usage example) MacDonald meaning ‘descendant of Donald' …"
  37. ^ The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, in 2 volumes, Oxford, Oxford University Press, © 1971, 26th printing July, 1987, Vol. 1 (A-O), p. 1960, in context of a Gaelic patronymic surname and, normally, also clan name, which by prefixing claims descent from a thereafter named common founding ancestor of an Irish or Scottish clan or clanna, that is, archaically, claims a national or clan membership, "O, O' … The Irish word ō, ua, OIr. au, ‘descendant', used as a prefix of Irish patronymic surnames … a member of an ancient Irish family. … P. Gillmore Hunter's Arcadia, An Irishman who claims his direct descent from Finn McCoul or some king whose name begins with an ‘O' or ‘Mc'. "
  38. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, in 2 volumes, Oxford, Oxford University Press, © 1971, 26th printing July, 1987, Volume 2 (P-Z), p. 2918, also provides the less common World Book usage of son with which the Gaelic language "Mac" translates to English when used as the element of a patronymic "6. A male descendant of some person or representative of some race … CHAUCER Sec. Nun's T. 62 Though that I unworthy sone of Eve, Be synful … SCOTT Monast. Introd., They have no share in the promise made to the sons of Adam"
  39. ^ Adolph, Anthony (2010). Collins Tracing Your Irish Family History. HarperCollins. p. 232. ISBN 9780007360956. 
  40. ^ a b "Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 319
  41. ^ Elsdon C. Smith, New Dictionary of American Surnames, New York, Harper and Row, © 1956, 1973, pp. 330, 367
  42. ^ The Encyclopedia of Ireland, B. Lalor and F. McCourt editors, © 2003 New Haven: Yale University Press, p. 1089 ISBN 0-300-09442-6, noting that Ulaidh was the original tribal designation of the Uluti, identifiable as the Voluntii of the Ptolomey map (See 2nd century AD Geographia of Ptolemy), who occupied, at start, all of the historic province of Ulster.
  43. ^ Neafsey, Edward (2002), The Surnames of Ireland: Origins and Numbers of Selected Irish Surnames, Irish Roots, p. 168 "Ultach was a territory in the northeast of Ireland after which the much larger province of Ulster was named."
  44. ^ The Encyclopedia of Ireland, B. Lalor and F. McCourt editors, © 2003 New Haven: Yale University Press, p. 1089 ISBN 0-300-09442-6, equating the original territorial extent of the Ulaidh (province) with Ulster province
  45. ^ a b The Oxford Companion to Irish History, 2nd ed., S.J. Connolly editor, © 1998, 2002 Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 350-351, ISBN 0-19-866270-X
  46. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (Principal Families of Ulster) p. 819 (footnote), also, The Oxford Companion of Irish History and the 11th Encyclopedia Britannica, concurring too in equating the province of Ulster and the original Ulaidh (province)
  47. ^ See also [7](for general info)
  48. ^ Angelo Forte, Richard D. Oram, Frederik Pedersen Viking Empires Cambridge University Press (2005) ISBN 0521829925, 9780521829922, p. 121
  49. ^ S. Plantagenet & S. Fiona A History of Ireland (1991) Psychology Press ISBN 0415048885, 9780415048880 pp 25-26 "But if no Roman army ever attacked from Britain, Irish raiders in groups or in larger contingents certainly attacked Britain in Roman times. As one authority put it ‘The Irish were a threat in Wales by the late third century, and a positive menace by the forth.' … The activities of the Irish against Britain during those times began as a series of sea raids up and down the western side … he may have captured a young Romano-British boy, aged about 16, named Patricius, son of Calpurnius, a decurian (local magistrate) … This was the future St. Patrick."
  50. ^ See also [8] The Viking In Ireland
  51. ^ 4th MacEachen's Gaelic-English Dictionary, Inverness, The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, 1922, p. 452
  52. ^ Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed., © 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica Company, Cambridge, England, p. 569 "Ulster (U'ladh) was one of the early provincial kingdoms of Ireland, formed, according to the legendary chronicles at the Milesian conquest of the island ten centuries before Christ, and given to the descendants of Ir …"
  53. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (The Line of Ir) p. 299 and (The Line of Heremon), pp. 351 and 355 (O'Hart's chronology differs from the Britannica in that at its page 351 at "37." it sets the date of establishment of the Ulaid state at 1699 BC, which has greater coincidence to the date of archeological evidence of an overwhelming 15th-century BC migration of Iberian Celts to Ireland, but at its page 355 at "72.", O'Hart's chronology concurs with the Britannica that Ulster province was granted as a kingdom to the descendants of Ir, which prince O'Hart notes at page 299 at "37." to have been a son of Milesius of Spain, who did not survive the Milesian or Iberians' conquest of Ireland but died in a ship sinking before that war vessel reached Ireland.)
  54. ^ The Encyclopedia of Ireland, B. Lalor and F. McCourt editors, © 2003 New Haven: Yale University Press, p. 1089 ISBN 0-300-09442-6, discussing the rapid diminution of the original territory of Ulahd province, so that for most of the historic existence of the Ulaidh, it consisted only of the extreme Eastern portion of Ulster
  55. ^ Edward MacLysaght, Irish Families – Their Names, Arms and Origins, © 1972 Allen Figgis and Co. Ltd., in U.S.A., New York, Crown Publishers, Inc. p. 118, "Mac Duinnshléibhe in Irish-though in some early manuscripts, e.g., the ‘Topographical Poems' of O'Dugan and O'Heerin, the prefix O' is used."
  56. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, pp. 351-355 (The Line of Heremon) , "Heremon was the seventh son of Milesius of Spain … but the third of the three sons who left any issue. From him were descended the Kings, Nobility, and Gentry of the Kingdoms of Connaught,* Dalraida, Leinster, Meath, Orgiall, Ossory; of Scotland, since the fifth century; and of England, from the reign of Henry II., down to the present time.", also, pp. 426, 427, 428 and 466 (Heremon Genealogies), p. 819 (Principal Families of Ulster) (O'Hart, a historian, but also in some significant measure a recounter of tradition, elsewhere in volume 1 of Irish Pedigrees, continues to trace this royal line from Milesius of Spain through the Pharos of Egypt and, finally, to the Patriarchs of the Bible and Adam)
  57. ^ 11th Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Merriam Webster's, Inc., © 2003, 2004, p. 227 "a Celtic group esp. within the Scottish Highlands comprising a number of households whose heads claim descent from a common ancestor"
  58. ^ 4th MacEachen's Gaelic-English Dictionary, Inverness, The Northern Counties Newspaper and Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, 1922, p. 90, pl., literally, "offspring"
  59. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p. 351 (The Line of Heremon), p. 466 (Heremon Genealogies) at "Garvey. (No. 2) of Tirowen. … 92. Ultach … his son; a quo MacAnUltaigh, anglicized MacNulty, Nulty, and Nalty. … 101. … his son O'Gairbidh (of Tirowen) anglicized Garvey.", p. 819 (Principal Families of Ulster)
  60. ^ [9] Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker, also notes under section "Migration of the Dunleavys from County Down" the McNulty to be ancestors of the O'Garvey of Tyrone and, also, that this "pedigree is distinct from that of the Dunleavys."
  61. ^ G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), pp 16-17 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  62. ^ Elsdon C. Smith New Dictionary of American Surnames, New York: Harper and Row, © 1956, 1973, p. 367
  63. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, (Heremon Genealogies), p. 428, including notes, "… The dominant family in Ulidia, when, A.D. 1177, it was invaded by John de Courcey, was that of Cu-Ulahd … Latinized Canis Ultoniae … meaning that this chief of Ulidia (which in the 12th century constituted also the ‘Kingdom of Ulster') was swift footed as a hound. …"
  64. ^ [10] Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker, Origin of Surnames, "Donn Sléibhe and Cú Uladh were found to carry through three (1020–1169) and two (1070–1169) periods respectively."
  65. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, pp. 428, 466 and 819
  66. ^ [11] Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker, sections "McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down" and "Migration of the Dunleavys from County Down"
  67. ^ Eoin MacNeill, "Early Irish Population Groups: their nomenclature, classification and chronology", in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (C) 29. (1911): 59–114
  68. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, p. 819 (Principal Families of Ulster), p. 466 (Heremon Genealogies)
  69. ^ War of Independence online archive, © 2011, Article about the foundation of Na Fianna Eireann – The Irish National Boy Scouts by the late Donnchadh Ó Shea.
  70. ^ Robert Bell The Book of Ulster surnames, p. 180, Belfast: Blackstaff © 1988, "The MacNultys were a sept of south Donegal …"
  71. ^ Brian Mitchell The Surnames of Derry, p. 105, Derry: Geaneology Centre © 1992, "… sept originated in South Donegal."
  72. ^ Edward MacLysaght, Irish Families – Their Names, Arms and Origins, © 1972 Allen Figgis and Co. Ltd., in U.S.A., New York, Crown Publishers, Inc. p. 244, " … belong to-day, as they have done since the inception of surnames, to north-west Ulster—to Donegal … "
  73. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 319, "MacAnulty, MacKNulty, MacNulty, Nulty; ‘son of the Ulidian', (or native of eastern Ulster, Ir. ‘Ultac.')"
  74. ^ Edward MacLysaght, The Surnames of Ireland, 5th Edition, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1980, p 238, 292
  75. ^ Seán De Bhulbh, Sloinnte uile Éireann Comhar-Chumann Íde Naofa, Faing, Co. Luimnigh, 2002, p 138
  76. ^ Again, Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 355
  77. ^ again, G.H. Hack Genealogical History of the Donlevy Family Columbus, Ohio: printed for private distribution by Chaucer Press, Evans Printing Co. (1901), p 38 (Wisconsin Historical Society Copy)
  78. ^ [12] Origin of the Surname, McNulty, and its Association with the McDonlevys/Dunleavys of County Down by Paul B. McNulty, Emeritus Professor, University College Dublin, a genealogical researcher and Irish language speaker.
  79. ^ Rev. Patrick Woulfe, Priest of the Diocese of Limerick, Member of the Council, National Academy of Ireland, Irish Names and Surnames, © 1967 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, in Irish and English, p. 518, "O'Duįnnsléibe … also known by surname MacDuįnnsléibe … and by there place of origin Ultaċ and Utaċán.", and, also, at p. 356 "… also Ultaċ and Utaċán, …" and "Cf. Ultaċ and Utaċán."
  80. ^ John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, 5th edition, in two volumes, originally published in Dublin in 1892, reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976, Vol. 1, pp.426-428, (Dunlevy pedigree)
  81. ^ Edward MacLysaght, Irish Families – Their Names, Arms and Origins, © 1972 Allen Figgis and Co. Ltd., in U.S.A., New York, Crown Publishers, Inc. p. 119
  82. ^ Dictionary of National Biography Sidney Lee, ed., New York: MacMillan & Co.; London: Smith, Elder & Co. (1893), Vol. 35 Mac Carwell – Maltby, p 52
  83. ^ Edward MacLysaght, The Surnames of Ireland, 5th Edition, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1980, p 238, 292, who cites to 2 entries in The Annals of the Four Masters, which is a historical chronicle that records, among other matter, the births and deaths of Gaelic nobility. The first entry cited is an entry recording the 1395 A.D. death of a Maurice, the son of one "Paul Utach", who is, himself, recorded there to be "Chief Physician of Tyrconnell" and also as "Paul the Ulidian". It is there in the Annals further stated by its authors of the father Paul Ultach that "This is the present usual Irish name of the Mac Donlevy, who were originally chiefs of Ulidia. The branch of the family who became physicians to O'Donnell are still extant (at time of compilation of the Annals in the 17th century just after the fall of the last Gaelic sovereignty of Tyrconnell in 1607), near Kilmacrenan, in the county of Donegal." The second citation is to an entry recording the 1586 A.D. death of "Owen Utach", who is therein noted to be a particularly distinguished and skilled physician. The Annals compilers further elaborate of Owen Ultach at this entry that "His real name was Donlevy or, Mac Donlevy. He was physician to O'Donnell."
  84. ^ Francis J. Byrne, Irish Kings and High Kings, Four Courts Press, 2001, p. 128, "So for instance when after 1137 the Dal Fiatach kingship was confined to the descendants of Donn Sleibe Mac Eochada (slain in 1091), the rigdamnai set themselves apart from the rest of the family by using the name Mac Duinnshleibhe (Donleavy)."
  85. ^ Again, The Oxford Companion to Irish History, 2nd ed., S.J. Connolly editor, © 1998, 2002 Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 350-351, ISBN 0-19-866270-X
  86. ^ See A. Nic Donnchadha, "Medical Writing in Irish", in 2000 Years of Irish Medicine, J.B. Lyons, ed., Dublin, Eirinn Health Care Publications © 2000, p. 217 (Nic Donchadha contribution reprinted from Irish Journal of Medicine, Vol. 169, No. 3, pp 217-220, again, at 217). See, also, generally, Susan Wilkinson, "Early Medical Education in Ireland", Irish Migration Studies in Latin America, Vol. 6, No. 3 (November 2008). Both of the preceding articles also discuss the high status that physicians were accorded in Gaelic society. Wilkinson at page 158 specifically discusses the particularly high status of "ollahm leighis".
  87. ^ Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, P. William Filby and Mary K. Meyer, editors, in 3 volumes with subsequent annual bound supplements, © 1981 Detroit: Gale Research Company, Vol. 2 (H-N), p. 1412 McNulty, Dan'l (Philadelphia 1802), McNulty, James (Philadelphia 1813), McNulty, Sarah (New York 1823 with 3 children), p. 1539 Naulty, James (Philadelphia 1832), p. 1568 Nulty, Eugenius (Philadelphia 1834)
  88. ^ New World Immigrants, Michael Tepper ed., (c) 1979 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., in 2 volumes, Volume II, Passenger Lists Published in the Shamrock or Irish Chronicle, for arrivals in New York, New York (before time of first official government compilations of arrival lists for port of New York), (1811) p. 339, Mac annulty, James, noted arriving in New York, New York and (1815–1816) p. 359 , MacAnalty, Patrick of Sligo, noted arriving in New York, New York, p. 362, MacNulty, Wm. of Tauley, noted arriving in New York, New York and from British Museum Transcripts, p. 313, McNalty, Hugh of Bangor, County Down, noted in 1806 departing Ulster for U.S. port unspecified
  89. ^ Ship Passenger Lists, National and New England (1600–1825), ed. Carl Boyer, Newhall, California, (c) 1977, ISBN 0-936124-00-8, p. 121, again, McNalty, Hugh, of Bangor, County Down, noted in 1806 departing Ulster for U.S. port
  90. ^ The Famine Immigrants - Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York, 1846–1851, in multiple volumes, Ira A. Glazier, editor, © 1983 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., ISBN 0-8063-1024-3, Vol. 1 (January 1846 – June 1847), Mcanulty pp. 27, 372, 424, 559, Mcnalty pp. 259, 410, 461, 501, Mcnulty pp. 49, 63, 67, 68, 74, 93, 94, 110, 139, 148, 151, 187, 211, 230, 250, 255, 292, 308, 332, 343, 363, 388, 403, 411, 423, 461, 468, 489, 516, 537, 544, 554, 576, 604, 617, Nulty pp. 14, 67, 101, 146, 150, 173, 185, 188, 200, 231, 455, 498, 533, 605, Vol. 2 (July 1847-June 1848) Mcanulty pp 252, 382, Mcnalty p. 256, Mcnaulty pp. 16, 138, Mcnultay p. 521, Mcnulty pp. 12, 18, 21, 94, 114, 120, 172, 201, 278, 282, 292, 451, 468, 507, 508, Nulty pp. 10, 45, 53, 89, 137, 293, 373, 375, 414, 450, 459
  91. ^ Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, P. William Filby and Mary K. Meyer, editors, in 3 volumes with subsequent annual bound supplements, © 1981 Detroit: Gale Research Company, Vol. 2 (H-N), pp. 1412 , 1539 , and 1568
  92. ^ [13]
  93. ^ sofeminine.co.uk surnames
  94. ^ "A note on the simultaneous occurrence of sinus and ventricular rhythm in man", Lewis T, Macnalty AS, J Physiol. 1908 Dec 15;37(5-6):445-58
  95. ^ [14] Douglas Martin “Barney McNulty Dies at 77, First to Use TV Cue Cards”, NY Times, Arts, December 26, 2000
  96. ^ [15] Myrna Oliver “Barney McNulty; ‘Hollywood’s Honored King of the Cue Cards’” Los Angeles Times December 22, 2000
  97. ^ "Nulty resigns over 'inappropriate' Facebook messages". RTÉ News. 23 March 2014. 
  98. ^ [16] Interlochen Center for the Arts high performing alumni
  99. ^ Clark G. Reynolds, Famous American Admirals, © 2002, Naval Institute Press, 1st Naval Edition, ISBN 9781557500069, pp. 215-216
  100. ^ [17], Naval History & Heritage Command catalogue of the U.S. Naval War College Library's naval military history source materials collection, Capt. James F. McNulty
  101. ^ Marquis Who's Who in America, Vol. 26 (1950–1952), Chicago, A.N. Marquis Co., © 1950, p. 1709
  102. ^ Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, James L. Mooney, U.S. Naval Historical Center, ed., (1976) Navy Dept., Office of Chief of Naval Operations, Naval History Division, Vol. 6, p. 6, "Willard J. McNulty"
  103. ^ [18], chronology of commanding officers of the U.S.S. Maury (AGS-16)
  104. ^ Joseph McKenna. (2010). British Ships in the Confederate Navy. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., p. 189 ISBN 978-0-7864-4530-1
  105. ^ Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, E.W. Wright, ed., © 1895 Lewis and Dryden Printing Co., p. 93 (including importantly footnotes thereof), available on demand historically replicated in reprint as ISBN 9785884013193
  106. ^ [19] Naval History and Heritage Command history and detail for U.S.S. McNulty
  107. ^ [20] Naval History and Heritage Command , Ship Naming Conventions, adding that United States Navy destroyers are only named for U.S. Naval leaders and war heroes
  108. ^ [21], "MCNULTY, John Thomas, Lieutenant (jg), USN. Wife, Mrs. Helen K. McNulty, 1116 S. Paxon St., Philadelphia."
  109. ^ Authority, citation, Official Records, U.S. Department of Defense (also awarded Distinguished Service Cross (United States) in same action, source War Department: General Order No. 20)
  110. ^ Authority - USMC Communiqué: 0587-1-3 ACE-fjb (18 July 1930)
  111. ^ [22], Home of Heroes, also, notes award of Navy Cross for same action
  112. ^ [23], synopsis of Navy Cross citation noting rank of Sergeant instead of more specific Gunner or Gunnery
  113. ^ [24]
  114. ^ [25] Gannet Military Times, citing to Jane Blakeney Heroes of the U.S. Marine Corps 1861–1955 (1957) Washington, D.C. Blakeney Publishing
  115. ^ [26], citing Akron Beacon Journal for 11 February 2010
  116. ^ [27] Gannet Military Times Hall of Valor here providing full citations and general orders for award of all of U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery McNulty's Navy Cross, Distinguished Service Cross and both of his Silver Stars
  117. ^ a b General Orders: Citation Orders, 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces
  118. ^ [28] Home of Heroes
  119. ^ [29] Casualties List provided at genealogical site
  120. ^ General Orders: Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 0746
  121. ^ [30] Gannet Military Times Hall of Valor
  122. ^ [31], naval service and family info
  123. ^ [32], War Memorial
  124. ^ citation text of General Orders: Headquarters, 3d Army, General Order No. 158 (2 July 1945), awarding Lt. Col. William A. McNulty the Silver Star
  125. ^ Tony Le Tissier Patton's Pawns The 94th U.S. Infantry Division at the Siegfried Line (2007) University of Alabama Press, Chapter 8 "Crossing the Saar" (commencing at p. 147) p. 158
  126. ^ again, citation text of General Orders: Headquarters, 3d Army, General Order No. 158 (2 July 1945), awarding Lt. Col. William A. McNulty the Silver Star
  127. ^ See, generally, D'Este, Carlo (1995), Patton: A Genius for War, New York City, New York: Harper Collins, ISBN 0-06-016455-7
  128. ^ Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. (1902). Part 1 Register of the Commandery of the State of Pennsylvania, April 15, 1865-September 1, 1902. (J.P. Nicholson, Compiler). Philadelphia: Press of J.T. Palmer, p. 99 (Google digitized Oct. 23, 2008), “James Madison McNulty Major and Surgeon 1st California Infantry Aug. 15, 1861; discharged to accept appointment in U.S. Volunteers April 16, 1863, Major and surgeon U.S. Volunteers; resigned and honorably discharged Feb. 5, 1865. Brevetted Lieut.-Colonel U.S. Volunteers March 13, 1865, ‘for faithful and meritorious services as Medical Director of the department of New Mexico;’ Colonel March 13, 1865, ‘for gallant and distinguished services as Medical Director of the 2nd Army Corps.’”
  129. ^ United States Congress, Senate. (1887). Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate of the United States, Vol. 14, Part 1. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, pp. 321, 344 and 372 (Google digitized October 15, 2008)
  130. ^ Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. (1906). Register of the Military Order of the Loyal Legions of the United States. (J.H. Aubin, Compiler) published under auspices of Commandery of the State of Massachusetts, p.155 (Google digitized October 16, 2009)
  131. ^ (1908) New York University, General Alumni Catalogue of New York University 1833-1907, Vol. 3, Medical Alumni, New York: General Alumni Society, p. 41 (Google digitized March 25, 2008), “1853 University Medical College John McNulty, brig. surgeon ‘Iron Brigade;’ med. dir. 12th Army Corps, Army of Potomac”,
  132. ^ Louis C. Duncan, The Greatest Battle of the War – Gettysburg The Military Surgeon Vol. 33, No. 5, November 1913, p. 411-413, p. 429
  133. ^ Jonathan Letterman, M.D. (1866). Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac. New York: D. Appleton & Co., p. 134
  134. ^ Edward B. Stevens, M.D. and John A. Murphy, M.D., Eds. Cincinnati Lancet and Observer. Vol. 7, No. 4, April 1864. “Editors Table”, “Army Medical Intelligence”, p. 250 (Google digitized Jan. 20, 2006).
  135. ^ John Thomas Scharf 1819–1880 Volume 3 of History of Maryland from the Earliest Period to the Present Day J.B. Piet (1879) p. 609
  136. ^ Scott C. Patchan Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign (2009) University of Nebraska Press pp. 287-289
  137. ^ J. Thomas Scharf History of Western Maryland (2003) Genealogical Publishing Co. p 337 ISBN 0806345659, 9780806345659, noting also that "This company (Baltimore Light Artillery) served with distinguished gallantry during the entire war in the Army of Northern Virginia."
  138. ^ David Power Conyngham The Irish Brigade and Its Campaigns Fordham University Press 1867 pp. 511 and 557 ISBN0823215784, 9780823215782
  139. ^ Charles Kitchell Gardner. A Dictionary of All Officers Who Have Been Commissioned or Appointed and Served in the Army of the United States Since the Inauguration of Their First President … Volunteers and Militias of the States Who Have Served in Any Campaign or Conflict With An Enemy Since That Date … (2nd Ed.). (1860). New York: D. Van Nostrand, p. 303 (Google digitized April 30, 2014)
  140. ^ Jefferson Davis. The Papers of Jefferson Davis: 1846-1848 (Vol. 3). (1981). Baton Rogue: Louisiana State University Press (reprint with introductory commentary) ISBN 0-8071-0786-7, p. 137, 139
  141. ^ Henry Clay Lewis. Louisiana Swamp Doctor.(1962). Baton Rogue: Louisiana State University Press (reprint), p. 47 (Google digitized March 10, 2008)
  142. ^ Sister Blanche Marie McEniry. American Catholics in the War with Mexico. (1937). Washington, D.C.: Catholic University Press, p. 163
  143. ^ Mexican War Veterans (Wm. Hugh Robarts, Compiler) (1887), p. 59 (Google Digitized August 3, 2006)
  144. ^ [33]
  145. ^ General Order No. 46, W.D., 1919
  146. ^ amedd.army Amedd Army
  147. ^ [34] Home of Heroes
  148. ^ [35] Home of Heroes
  149. ^ [36] genealogy site detail
  150. ^ [37] 31st Infantry Veterans
  151. ^ [38] 31st U.S. Infantry Regiment, History, Col. (ret.) Karl H. Lowe American's Foreign Legion, The 31st Infantry Regiment at War and Peace, A book in progress Chapter 6 "Bataan and Corregidor 1941–1942" pp. 16-18
  152. ^ [39] 31st U.S. Infantry Regiment, History, Col. (ret.) Karl H. Lowe American's Foreign Legion, The 31st Infantry Regiment at War and Peace, A book in progress Chapter 7 "Captivity 1942–1945", "Cabanatuan Roster" … "Company L"
  153. ^ General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Air Forces, Iceland, General Orders No. 12 (1943)
  154. ^ [40] Gannet Military Times Hall of Valor
  155. ^ [41] "Hats Off to Mystery Serviceman" Dalton Daily Citizen 22 September 2011
  156. ^ http://www.lwag.org/forums/showthread.php?t=3251 Luftwaffe Archives and Records
  157. ^ http://www.lwag.org/forums/showthread.php?t=3249 Luftwaffe Archives and Records
  158. ^ [42], Home of Heroes
  159. ^ General Orders: Headquarters, 42d Infantry Division, General Orders No. 13 (1945)
  160. ^ [43] Gannet Military Times, Hall of Valor, photograph of PFC McNulty here also available for view
  161. ^ [44] Gannett Military Times Hall of Valor
  162. ^ General Orders: General Orders No. 38 (1951), Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (1951)
  163. ^ [45] Gannet Military Times Hall of Valor
  164. ^ Home of Heroes
  165. ^ General Orders: Headquarters, 3d Army, General Orders No. 158 (2 July 1945)
  166. ^ [46] Gannet Military Times Hall of Valor
  167. ^ [47]
  168. ^ [48]
  169. ^ Assembly, Vol. 5, No. 1, April, 1946, p 4 "We Salute", "Legion of Merit", magazine of "Association of Graduates, U.S.M.A.", noting award of Legion of Merit to West Point graduate John A. McNulty, Evening Independent, 8 Nov. 1983, p 9 "deaths Col. John McNulty", noting John McNulty's rank at retirement from U.S. Army as Colonel
  170. ^ [49] Vietnam War Honors for Willard McNulty
  171. ^ [50] Iraq War Heroes
  172. ^ [51] Arlington National Cemetery official biography
  173. ^ Congressional Record Volume 141, Number 116 (Tuesday, 18 July 1995) Page E1460
  174. ^ ENIAC's first use was in calculations for the hydrogen bomb. Moye, William T (January 1996). "ENIAC: The Army-Sponsored Revolution". US Army Research Laboratory. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  175. ^ [52] Naval History and Heritage Command
  176. ^ [53] chronology of commanding officers of the U.S.S. Maury (AGS-16)
  177. ^ [54] chronological photo archive of USS Renate AKA-36 and/or USS Maury AGS-16
  178. ^ [55] USS Maury AGS-16 tribute site noting ship's extensive surveys along eastern coast of Vietnam in 1966, 1967 and 1968 during the height of the Vietnam War.
  179. ^ [56]
  180. ^ corresponding goatskin Morocco leather bound, CIA Book of Honor at Memorial Wall in steel frame under 1" thick glass (26 of the 103 stars remain unnamed for national security reasons even in death. The identities of these "unnamed stars" are not included in the Book of Honor and remain secret.)
  181. ^ [57] 5th Regiment Website
  182. ^ [58] Korean War Online
  183. ^ Brisbane Courier-Mail Thursday 11 March 1954, p. 6, "Queen's Interest in Korea Men (Twenty veterans at investiture) … Military Medal … Sergeant Edward John McNulty …"
  184. ^ [59], citing to London Gazette dated 10 October 1944 and AFRO 2534/44 dated 24 November 1944
  185. ^ [60]
  186. ^ [61], referencing Ab Jansen Wespennest Leeuwarden, Vol. III, page 167, a copyrighted photograph therefrom of the Sergeant with the other of the four-engined Short Stirling bomber's crew is also here available for view
  187. ^ [62] Orleans Online Vol. 1, Week 51, Fred Sherwin's regular "View Point" column
  188. ^ Henry Stevens Washington Chemical Analysis of Igneous Rocks (USGS Professional Paper No. 14) Washington, D.C.: Govt. Printing Office (1903) p 163
  189. ^ A.H. Koschmann and M.H. Bergendahl Principal Gold Producing Districts of the United States (Geological Survey Professional Paper 610) Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (1968) (Library of Congress catalog-card no. GS 68-341) p 117
  190. ^ O.J. Hollister The mines of Colorado Springfield, Massachusetts: S. Bowles & Co. (1867) p 326
  191. ^ A.H. Koschmann and M.H. Bergendahl Principal Gold Producing Districts of the United States (Geological Survey Professional Paper 610) Washington: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (1968) (Library of Congress catalog-card no. GS 68-341) p 86
  192. ^ The Mansfield Herald 6 March 1884, Vol. 34, No. 16
  193. ^ W.J. Davis An Illustrated History of Sacramento County Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co. (1890) Chapter 7 "County Government" pp 39-45
  194. ^ [63] St. Petersburg Times
  195. ^ Lexicon of Geological Names of the United States (Including Alaska) Part 2 M-Z (Geological Survey Bulletin 896) Mary Grace Wilmarth, compiler, p. 1260, United States Dept. of Interior, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office (1938) (Univ. of Mich., Digitized 18 February 2010)

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