McCook, Nebraska

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McCook, Nebraska
City
Downtown George Norris Avenue, looking south, 2010
Downtown George Norris Avenue, looking south, 2010
Location of McCook, Nebraska
Location of McCook, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°12′19″N 100°37′34″W / 40.20528°N 100.62611°W / 40.20528; -100.62611Coordinates: 40°12′19″N 100°37′34″W / 40.20528°N 100.62611°W / 40.20528; -100.62611
CountryUnited States
StateNebraska
CountyRed Willow
Government
 • MayorDennis Berry
Area[1]
 • Total5.39 sq mi (13.96 km2)
 • Land5.39 sq mi (13.96 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation2,572 ft (784 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total7,698
 • Estimate (2012[3])7,652
 • Density1,428.2/sq mi (551.4/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code69001
Area code(s)308
FIPS code31-29925
GNIS feature ID0831117[4]
Websitecityofmccook.com
 
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McCook, Nebraska
City
Downtown George Norris Avenue, looking south, 2010
Downtown George Norris Avenue, looking south, 2010
Location of McCook, Nebraska
Location of McCook, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°12′19″N 100°37′34″W / 40.20528°N 100.62611°W / 40.20528; -100.62611Coordinates: 40°12′19″N 100°37′34″W / 40.20528°N 100.62611°W / 40.20528; -100.62611
CountryUnited States
StateNebraska
CountyRed Willow
Government
 • MayorDennis Berry
Area[1]
 • Total5.39 sq mi (13.96 km2)
 • Land5.39 sq mi (13.96 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation2,572 ft (784 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total7,698
 • Estimate (2012[3])7,652
 • Density1,428.2/sq mi (551.4/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code69001
Area code(s)308
FIPS code31-29925
GNIS feature ID0831117[4]
Websitecityofmccook.com

McCook is a city and county seat of Red Willow County, Nebraska, United States.[5] The population was 7,698 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

McCook was founded in 1882.[6] It was named in honor of Alexander McDowell McCook, a Brigadier General in the Union Army during the American Civil War.[7]

Geography[edit]

McCook is located at 40°12′19″N 100°37′34″W / 40.20528°N 100.62611°W / 40.20528; -100.62611 (40.205228, -100.626174).[8] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.39 square miles (13.96 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18902,346
19002,4454.2%
19103,76554.0%
19204,30314.3%
19306,68855.4%
19406,212−7.1%
19507,67823.6%
19608,3018.1%
19708,285−0.2%
19808,4041.4%
19908,112−3.5%
20007,994−1.5%
20107,698−3.7%
Est. 20127,652−0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
2012 Estimate[10]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 7,698 people, 3,324 households, and 2,021 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,428.2 inhabitants per square mile (551.4 /km2). There were 3,717 housing units at an average density of 689.6 per square mile (266.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.8% White, 0.5% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 1.5% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.9% of the population.

There were 3,324 households of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.2% were non-families. 33.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.89.

The median age in the city was 40.7 years. 23% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22% were from 25 to 44; 26.2% were from 45 to 64; and 19.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 7,994 people, 3,371 households, and 2,154 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,485.1 people per square mile (573.7/km²). There were 3,754 housing units at an average density of 697.4 per square mile (269.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.37% White, 0.18% African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.91% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.53% of the population. The population was 7,410 in 2009.

There were 3,371 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.1% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $31,105, and the median income for a family was $40,455. Males had a median income of $28,065 versus $18,516 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,691. About 7.9% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.7% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.

Culture[edit]

The Harvey P. Sutton House at 602 Norris Avenue was designed by influential architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1905-1907 and built 1907-1908. The classic Prairie-style house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places; it is the only Wright house known to have been built in Nebraska.[11] The house is used as a private residence, and is not open to the public.[12]

McCook hosts the Buffalo Commons Storytelling Festival each summer.[13] There is also the Heritage Day Celebration and the McCook Balloon Fest in September.

McCook Army Airfield, active from 1943 through 1945, was located nine miles northwest of McCook.

McCook hosted a professional baseball team, the McCook Braves, who played in the Nebraska State League from 1956-59. In their final season in 1959, the club featured future Baseball Hall of Famer Phil Niekro and won the NSL championship; both the Braves and the league folded at season's end. Another pitcher on the team, Pat Jordan, later became a writer for the Sporting News, and wrote an autobiography dealing with his career with the Braves, A False Spring.[14]

Government[edit]

The City of McCook has a council-manager style government. Five council members are elected at large; the five elect one of their number as mayor, and a second as vice president. As of 2012, council members are mayor Dennis Berry, vice-president Mike Gonzales, Jerry Calvin, Janet Hepp, and Bruce McDowell.[15]

The City of McCook is organized into eight different departments and offices, which are the: Public Library, Parks, Trash/Recycling, Fire Department, Senior Citizens Affairs, Police Department, Water Department, and Public Transportation.

The City of McCook also hosts thirteen advisory boards and commissions for public service, public works, and the functions of the aforementioned departments and offices.

Transportation[edit]

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service through McCook, operating its California Zephyr daily in both directions between Chicago and Emeryville (Oakland), California, with stops in Omaha, Lincoln, Hastings. Great Lakes Airlines is currently serving the McCook Regional Airport with commercial flights to Denver and Huron, South Dakota.

Media[edit]

AM Radio[edit]

FM radio stations
FrequencyCall signNameFormatOwnerTarget city/marketCity of license
1300 AMKBRLThe Big TalkerNews/TalkArmada MediaMcCookMcCook
1360 AMKNGNChristianKansas Nebraska Good News BroadcastingMcCookMcCook

FM Radio[edit]

FM radio stations
FrequencyCall signNameFormatOwnerTarget city/marketCity of license
93.9 FMKSWN-FMThe ZoneContemporary HitsLegacy CommunicationsMcCookMcCook
95.3 FMKGCRChristianThe Praise Network, IncMcCook-
96.1 FMKICXHot ACArmada MediaMcCookMcCook
102.1 FMKZMCTrue County 102.1Classic CountryLegacy CommunicationsMcCookMcCook
101.1 FMKFNFToday's Best CountryCountryArmada MedaMcCookOberlin
103.9KQHKThe HawkClassic RockArmada MediaMcCookMcCook
105.3 FMKIODCoyote 105CountryLegacy CommunicationMcCookMcCook

Notable people[edit]

George W. Norris, who held seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate from 1903 to 1943, was a resident of McCook. Norris was the driving force behind the conversion of Nebraska's legislature to a unicameral system; in the Senate, he was a leading figure behind the creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority. His house in McCook is operated as a museum by the Nebraska State Historical Society, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Originally named Main, the principal north-south thoroughfare through central McCook was renamed Norris Avenue in his honor.

Three governors of Nebraska made their homes in McCook: Ralph G. Brooks, Frank Morrison, and Ben Nelson, who represented Nebraska in the U.S. Senate for two terms, from 2000-2012.

John R. McCarl, the first Comptroller General of the United States, was raised in McCook. He is also buried there.[16]

Former professional football player Jeff Kinney is a 1968 graduate of McCook High School.

Actor Stuart Grant, who had parts in several major films including Geronimo: An American Legend and Hot Shots! Part Deux, grew up in McCook.[17]

TV Evangelist Bob Larson was raised in McCook.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  6. ^ Burr, George L. (1921). History of Hamilton and Clay Counties, Nebraska, Volume 1. S.J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 134. 
  7. ^ Exploring History in McCook
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  11. ^ Murphy, D. (1978). National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: H. P. Sutton Residence. Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 2010-09-16.
  12. ^ "Landmarks & Museums". McCook Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2010-09-16.
  13. ^ Buffalo Commons Storytelling Festival
  14. ^ 1959 McCook Braves; Baseball Reference.
  15. ^ "City Council". City of McCook, Nebraska. Retrieved 2012-04-04.
  16. ^ "John R. McCarl Dies of Heart Attack at 60." Washington Post. August 3, 1940; Hein, Linda. "Norris, McCarl Considered for Presidency in '36 Election." McCook Gazette. January 11, 2002.
  17. ^ "McCook Daily Gazette - Dec 9, 1993". Google News. Retrieved 2013-11-14.

External links[edit]