Maryville, Missouri

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Maryville, Missouri
City
Nodaway County Courthouse, 2006
Location of city within Nodaway County and Missouri
U.S. Census Map of Maryville
Coordinates: 40°20′43″N 94°52′16″W / 40.34528°N 94.87111°W / 40.34528; -94.87111Coordinates: 40°20′43″N 94°52′16″W / 40.34528°N 94.87111°W / 40.34528; -94.87111[1]
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountyNodaway
Platted1845
Government
 • TypeMayor–Council
 • MayorJames Fall [2]
 • City ManagerGreg McDanel [3]
 • City ClerkSheila Smail [3]
Area[4]
 • Total5.80 sq mi (15.02 km2)
 • Land5.77 sq mi (14.94 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation[1]1,152 ft (351 m)
Population (2010)[5][6]
 • Total11,972
 • Estimate (2012)12,015
 • Density2,074.9/sq mi (801.1/km2)
Time zoneCST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code64468 [7]
Area code(s)660
FIPS code29-46640 [1]
GNIS feature ID0721948 [1]
Websitemaryvillemo.org
 
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Maryville, Missouri
City
Nodaway County Courthouse, 2006
Location of city within Nodaway County and Missouri
U.S. Census Map of Maryville
Coordinates: 40°20′43″N 94°52′16″W / 40.34528°N 94.87111°W / 40.34528; -94.87111Coordinates: 40°20′43″N 94°52′16″W / 40.34528°N 94.87111°W / 40.34528; -94.87111[1]
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountyNodaway
Platted1845
Government
 • TypeMayor–Council
 • MayorJames Fall [2]
 • City ManagerGreg McDanel [3]
 • City ClerkSheila Smail [3]
Area[4]
 • Total5.80 sq mi (15.02 km2)
 • Land5.77 sq mi (14.94 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation[1]1,152 ft (351 m)
Population (2010)[5][6]
 • Total11,972
 • Estimate (2012)12,015
 • Density2,074.9/sq mi (801.1/km2)
Time zoneCST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code64468 [7]
Area code(s)660
FIPS code29-46640 [1]
GNIS feature ID0721948 [1]
Websitemaryvillemo.org

Maryville is a city and county seat of Nodaway County, Missouri, United States.[1] As of the 2010 census, the city population was 11,972.[8][9] Maryville is home to Northwest Missouri State University, Northwest Technical School, and the Missouri Academy of Science, Mathematics and Computing.

History[edit]

The town, organized on February 14, 1845, was named for Mrs. Mary Graham, wife of Amos Graham, then the county clerk. Mary was the first woman of European descent to have lived within the boundaries of the site which would become Maryville.[10]

In 1931, a notorious lynching occurred in Maryville when a mob burned alive African American Raymond Gunn, who had confessed to killing and attempting to rape a 20 year-old white school teacher. The lynching attracted national attention and was frequently invoked in the unsuccessful campaign to pass the Wagner-Costigan Act, which would have made it a federal crime for law enforcement officials to refuse to try to prevent a lynching.[11][12][13][14]

The Coleman Maryville case, sometimes known as the Maryville Rape case, is a controversy in the United States concerning an incident that occurred in January, 2012. A significant controversy arose in Maryville in 2012 after the prosecution dropped sexual assault charges related to the alleged rape of two girls, aged 13 and 14, in early 2012. Both of the accused 17-year old men pled not guilty and have claimed that the sexual encounters were consensual[1]. The 14 year old girl was found outside her home after two to three hours in freezing weather while her friend had gone inside. One of the alleged rapists is the grandson of a former longtime member of the Missouri House of Representatives.[15][16] The family of the girl allegedly raped by one of the young men eventually left Maryville due to alleged, undocumented ongoing harassment and alleged, undocumented death threats from local citizens. Their unsold house in Maryville later burnt down under mysterious circumstances several months after the Colemans moved out of town and a cause has yet to be formally determined.[15] Outrage in online communities soon followed when the story surrounding this case was revisited in October 2013.[17] On October 21, 2013, Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Baker was picked to investigate the case.[18]

Geography[edit]

Maryville is located at 40°20′43″N 94°52′16″W / 40.34528°N 94.87111°W / 40.34528; -94.87111 (40.345353, -94.871199),[1] which is about 100 miles (160 km) north of the Kansas City metropolitan area. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.80 square miles (15.02 km2), of which, 5.77 square miles (14.94 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[4]

The One Hundred and Two River, located on the eastern side of the city, is the primary source of power and water for the city.

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
CensusPop.
19506,834
19607,80714.2%
19709,97027.7%
19809,558−4.1%
199010,66311.6%
200010,581−0.8%
201011,97213.1%
Est. 201112,0160.4%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 11,972 people, 4,217 households, and 1,865 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,074.9 inhabitants per square mile (801.1 /km2). There were 4,543 housing units at an average density of 787.3 per square mile (304.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.3% White, 3.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.7% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population.

There were 4,217 households of which 20.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.7% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 55.8% were non-families. 35.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.82.

The median age in the city was 22.7 years. 13.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 43.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 16.3% were from 25 to 44; 14.8% were from 45 to 64; and 11.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[19] of 2000, there were 10,581 people, 3,913 households, and 1,835 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,102.8 people per square mile (812.2/km²). There were 4,227 housing units at an average density of 840.0 per square mile (324.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.78% White, 1.48% African American, 0.18% Native American, 1.46% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.98% of the population.

There were 3,913 households out of which 20.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.4% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 53.1% were non-families. 35.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the city the population was spread out with 14.0% under the age of 18, 41.4% from 18 to 24, 17.3% from 25 to 44, 14.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The mean age was 23 years. For every 100 females there were 87.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.6 males.

The mean income for a household in the city was $29,043, and the mean income for a family was $43,906. Males had a mean income of $30,444 versus $22,444 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,483. About 10.3% of families and 23.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.3% of those under age 18 and 14.2% of those age 65 or over.

Points of interest[edit]

Administration Building at Northwest Missouri State University, 2006
Mozingo Lake Golf Course, 2006
Mansion on South Vine Street where both of Maryville, Missouri governors (Albert P. Morehouse and Forrest C. Donnell) coincidentally lived, 2007
Maryville from US 136, 2008

Recreation[edit]

Maryville has ten city parks, which includes six baseball fields, several soccer and American football fields, a skate park, and a nature park. The city also maintains the Mozingo Lake Park and Golf Course. The golf course consists of 18 holes and is situated about the lake.

Government[edit]

The city of Maryville is governed by a city council consisting of five members who are elected at-large and serve terms of three years. There is no limit to the number of terms that one can serve on the council. Each year, one of the council members is selected to serve as the mayor of the city and another as the mayor pro tem.[2]

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary education[edit]

The Maryville R-II School District contains 3 separate buildings:

Maryville is also served by

Colleges[edit]

Maryville is also home to Northwest Missouri State University.

Media[edit]

Radio[edit]

Four licensed broadcast stations in the town are:

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

There are two U.S. Highways in Maryville. U.S. Route 71 and U.S. Route 136 intersect on the eastern side of the city. A branch of US 71, U.S. Route 71 Business, serves as the main street for the city. Route 46, Route 148, and Route V also provide access outside of the city.

Maryville is served by the Northwest Missouri Regional Airport, which is a general aviation airport with no commercial service.

Health care[edit]

Maryville is home of St. Francis Hospital and Health Services. [20]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) details for Maryville, Missouri; United States Geological Survey (USGS); October 24, 1980.
  2. ^ a b Mayor and Council; City of Maryville.
  3. ^ a b Administration Staff; City of Maryville.
  4. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  6. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  7. ^ United States Postal Service (2012). "USPS - Look Up a ZIP Code". Retrieved 2012-02-15. 
  8. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 9, 2012. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  10. ^ A Biographical History of Nodaway and Atchison Counties Missouri, Compendium on National Biography, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1901. Retrieved 2009-09-06.
  11. ^ Lawrence O. Christensen, ed. (1999). Dictionary of Missouri Biography. University of Missouri Press. pp. 359–361. ISBN 978-0826212221. 
  12. ^ "RACES: Lynching No. 1". Time. January 19, 1931. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Colter-Gunn Incident Bibliography". B. D. Owens Library, Northwest Missouri State University. Retrieved October 15, 2013. 
  14. ^ Raper, Arthur F. (2003). The Tragedy of Lynching (African American). Dover Publications. ISBN 978-0486430980. 
  15. ^ a b Arnett, Dugan (12 October 2013). Nightmare in Maryville: Teens’ sexual encounter ignites a firestorm against family, The Kansas City Star
  16. ^ (11 July 2013). Why Was The Maryville Rape Case Dropped?, KCUR-FM
  17. ^ David Von Drehle. Hackers Target Town After Dropped Sexual-Assault Case, Time, October 14, 2013
  18. ^ Special prosecutor appointed to investigate Missouri rape case; LA Times; October 21, 2013.
  19. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ St. Francis Hospital - History

External links[edit]