Maryland Route 333

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Maryland Route 333 marker

Maryland Route 333

Maryland Route 333 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length:9.79 mi[1] (15.76 km)
Major junctions
South end:Oxford–Bellevue Ferry terminal in Oxford
  MD 322 in Easton
North end:Washington Street in Easton
Location
Counties:Talbot
Highway system
MD 332MD 334
 
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Maryland Route 333 marker

Maryland Route 333

Maryland Route 333 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length:9.79 mi[1] (15.76 km)
Major junctions
South end:Oxford–Bellevue Ferry terminal in Oxford
  MD 322 in Easton
North end:Washington Street in Easton
Location
Counties:Talbot
Highway system
MD 332MD 334

Maryland Route 333 (MD 333) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. The state highway runs 9.79 miles (15.76 km) from the terminal of the seasonal Oxford–Bellevue Ferry in Oxford north to Washington Street in Easton within southwestern Talbot County. MD 333 was constructed between Trippe Creek and Easton in the 1910s. The highway was extended to Oxford in the late 1920s. In Easton, MD 333 was assigned to the southern part of Washington Street between 1948 and 1959 after U.S. Route 213 (later US 50) bypassed the town.

Route description[edit]

Northbound MD 333 past intersection with Spring Road.

MD 333 begins at the Oxford terminal of the Oxford–Bellevue Ferry along the Tred Avon River. The state highway heads southeast through the town as Morris Street. At the southern end of the town at the head of a branch of Town Creek, Morris Street continues straight as a municipal street while MD 333 curves to the east and leaves the town via Oxford Road. The state highway heads east through farmland, beginning a curve to the northeast shortly before Almshouse Road. MD 333 begins to pass residential subdivisions and golf courses as the highway turns north and crosses Trippe Creek and Peach Blossom Creek. North of the latter creek, the state highway enters the town of Easton, then crosses Paper Mill Pond before intersecting MD 322 (Easton Parkway). MD 333 continues northeast as Peach Blossom Road past Easton Middle School to its northern terminus at a five-way intersection with Washington Street, Harrison Street, and Idlewild Avenue.[1][2]

History[edit]

The first section of MD 333 was constructed as a state-aid road between Trippe Creek and Peach Blossom Creek in 1913. The state-aid work included bridges over both creeks.[3] The highway was extended as another state-aid project north from Peach Blossom Creek to Easton by 1919.[4] MD 333 was reconstructed as a state highway beginning in 1925. The highway north of Peach Blossom Creek and the portion between Almshouse Road and Trippe Creek were paved or repaved by 1927.[5][6] MD 333 was completed when the highway was completed between Oxford and Almshouse Road by 1930.[7] At the Easton end, MD 333 was extended south on Washington Street to the new eastern bypass of Easton in 1948 when the town was bypassed by US 213, which became US 50 in 1949.[8][9] MD 333's northern terminus was returned to Washington Street when MD 565 was assigned to Washington Street in 1958.[10] The bridges over Peach Blossom Creek and Trippe Creek were replaced in 1997 and 1998, respectively.[11][12]

Junction list[edit]

The entire route is in Talbot County.

LocationMile
[1]
kmDestinationsNotes
Oxford0.000.00Oxford–Bellevue Ferry terminal – Bellevue
Easton9.4115.14 MD 322 (Easton Parkway) to US 50 – Cambridge, Bay Bridge
9.7915.76Washington Street / Harrison Street north / Idlewild Avenue east
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2011). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  2. ^ Google Inc. "Maryland Route 333". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Ferry+Crossing+Slip+Rd&daddr=Peachblossom+Rd&hl=en&geocode=FaBpTgIdDKt1-w%3BFfaATwId3DN3-w&mra=ls&sll=38.763863,-76.075988&sspn=0.00384,0.009645&ie=UTF8&t=h&z=12. Retrieved 2010-09-12.
  3. ^ Weller, O.E.; Parran, Thomas; Miller, W.B.; Perry, John M.; Ramsay, Andrew; Smith, J. Frank (May 1916). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1912–1915 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 64–65, 95. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  4. ^ Zouck, Frank H.; Uhl, G. Clinton; Mudd, John F. (January 1920). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1916–1919 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 48. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  5. ^ Mackall, John N.; Darnall, R. Bennett; Brown, W.W. (January 1927). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1924–1926 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 34, 99. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  6. ^ Maryland Geological Survey. Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map) (1927 ed.).
  7. ^ Maryland Geological Survey. Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map) (1930 ed.).
  8. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1948 ed.).
  9. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1949 ed.).
  10. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission. Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1958 ed.).
  11. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000200016010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  12. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000200017010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing