Martin Offiah

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Martin Offiah
Personal information
Full nameMartin Nwokocha Offiah[1]
NicknameChariots
Born(1966-12-29) 29 December 1966 (age 45)
London Borough of Hackney, England
Playing information
Height185 cm (6 ft 1 in)
Weight91 kg (14 st 5 lb)
Rugby league
PositionWing
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1987–91Widnes14518100724
1989Easts Roosters1290036
1991St. George14110044
1992–95Wigan15918613749
1993Easts Roosters10000
1996–99London Broncos1670028
2000–01Salford City Reds41200282
Total388414151663
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1988–94Great Britain332600104
1992–96England580233
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
2001–02London Wasps1130015
Source: slstats.org, yesterdayshero.com.au, martinoffiah.co.uk
 
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Martin Offiah
Personal information
Full nameMartin Nwokocha Offiah[1]
NicknameChariots
Born(1966-12-29) 29 December 1966 (age 45)
London Borough of Hackney, England
Playing information
Height185 cm (6 ft 1 in)
Weight91 kg (14 st 5 lb)
Rugby league
PositionWing
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1987–91Widnes14518100724
1989Easts Roosters1290036
1991St. George14110044
1992–95Wigan15918613749
1993Easts Roosters10000
1996–99London Broncos1670028
2000–01Salford City Reds41200282
Total388414151663
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1988–94Great Britain332600104
1992–96England580233
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
2001–02London Wasps1130015
Source: slstats.org, yesterdayshero.com.au, martinoffiah.co.uk

Martin Offiah MBE (born 29 December 1966 in London, England)[2] is an English former rugby league and rugby union footballer. He is known as "Chariots" Offiah after the film Chariots of Fire.[3]

Since retiring Offiah has also provided commentary for Sky Sports rugby league coverage and worked as a player agent.[4]

Contents

Early career

A Londoner, Offiah attended Woolverstone Hall School near Ipswich, Suffolk, where he represented the school at fencing and played rugby and cricket. He played for Essex 2nd XI but soon realised his main talent was for rugby. At club level, he first played rugby union for Rosslyn Park and after starring on the Sevens circuit and for the Barbarians, there was talk of an England future.[5]

Widnes

Offiah was spotted by Widnes coach Doug Laughton playing in the Middlesex Sevens and was "brought North" to play rugby league for the 1987–88 season. Alex Murphy had been interested in acquiring Offiah from rugby union, but the board of directors at St. Helens infamously referred to Offiah as an "uncoordinated clown" and the interest was not followed up with action. Within months, he became the most talked about winger since Billy Boston for his lightning speed and try scoring, and it was at Widnes where he forged his reputation as a devastating winger, scoring 181 tries in 145 games over 4 seasons. He ended his debut season as top try scorer and selection for the Great Britain tour of Australasia.

During the 1989–90 Rugby Football League season, Offiah played for defending champions Widnes on the wing in their 1989 World Club Challenge victory against the visiting Canberra Raiders.

Wigan

Offiah joined Wigan in January 1992 for a world record fee of £440,000[6] (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £868,000 in 2009).[7] This figure remained a record for a total cash transfer until Wigan beat their own record, paying £450,000 for Stuart Fielden from the Bradford Bulls in 2006.

Playing in his regular Left Wing position, Offiah became more of a rounded player under coach John Monie and formed a devastating partnership with Gene Miles in his first season at Wigan scoring 30 tries in just 15 games including setting a new club record of ten in a single match against Leeds in the Premiership semi-final in May.[8]

Offiah was often criticised for his defense, but he vastly improved whilst at Wigan, famously making a match saving tackle on Alan Hunte in a game against St. Helens in 1993 when the winger was about to score.

He was selected to go on the 1992 Great Britain Lions tour of Australia and New Zealand. Before the match against Parramatta at Parramatta Stadium, Offiah had a 100m match race against Eels winger Lee Oudenryn, a junior soccer product who had switched to league late and had only played 5 games for the Eels at that time. Offiah's standing as the fastest player in rugby league took a beating when Oudenryn won by half a yard. Unconfirmed rumours surfaced at the time that some of the Lions players had heavily backed the Eels flyer to win (Offiah was the bookies favourite), and that Offiah had in fact deliberately missed the start of the race in order for his team mates to collect the winnings.[9]

During the 1992–93 Rugby Football League season Offiah played on the wing for defending RFL champions Wigan in the 1992 World Club Challenge against the visiting Brisbane Broncos.

Offiah played in four Challenge Cup wins, five Championship teams, three Regal Trophy wins and one Lancashire Cup victory. He twice won the Lance Todd Trophy at Wembley. His 90 metre solo try in the 1994 Challenge Cup Final win over Leeds is remembered as one of the finest ever seen in a final, but he made a habit of such runs during his career, scoring a similar try just weeks before against Castleford. After the 1993–94 Rugby Football League season Offiah travelled with defending champions Wigan to Brisbane, playing on the wing in their 1994 World Club Challenge victory over Australian premiers, the Brisbane Broncos.

Offiah made a total of 158 appearances for Wigan with another single appearance as a substitute. He scored more than a try a game, crossing the line 186 times. He also managed a goal and 3 drop goals thus scoring a grand total of 749 points for the club. He left the club in 1996 to return to the capital to play for London Broncos, but sent an open letter to the Wigan Observer thanking fans and the club for his time there.

Offiah a blaze of glory.jpg

A biography by David Lawrenson entitled Offiah: A Blaze of Glory was published in 1993. In 1995, Martin Offiah's life story, a 30 minute documentary was produced and directed by Pogus Caesar for Carlton TV UK as part of the Respect TV series.

Later career

When the game made the switch to summer rugby in 1996, Offiah played in only ten games before moving to the London Broncos. He was awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours 1997 and also played for London in their 1999 Challenge Cup final defeat against Leeds. After this he moved to Salford for the 2000 season, staying for two seasons. He finished his career with London Wasps in Rugby Union.

In 2004 Offiah was one of the celebrities who took part in the first series of the BBC's successful show Strictly Come Dancing, reaching fourth place with his partner Erin Boag. In 2005 alongside Natasha Kaplinsky, he hosted the one-off special, Strictly African Dancing.

He currently works as a pundit for Sky Sports rugby league coverage. He was a regular studio guest during the 2008 Rugby League World Cup, and he presents a weekly Super League round up on Sky Sports News.

Offiah is also the agent for Warrington scrum half Richie Myler and Kyle Eastmond of Bath RU.

Personal life

Offiah has 2 sons with his partner Virginia Shaw and lives in West London. He also has two twin sons from a relationship with Julie Loynd of Leigh, Greater Manchester.

In 2006 he appeared on a Reality TV Special of The Weakest Link, winning £10,050 and splitting the winnings with Danniella Westbrook. Only once in the game did Martin get a single vote, and statistically was the strongest link in round six.

Representative career

Only eight players have ever scored drop goals for England, they are; John Keith Bridges (1), George Fairbairn (1), Bobbie Goulding (1), Sean Long (1), Martin Offiah (1), Harry Pinner (2), Alan Redfearn (1), Nigel Wright (1).[10]

Along with James "Jim" Leytham, Stanley "Stan" Moorhouse, Peter Norburn, Keith Fielding, Stuart Wright, and Sam Tomkins, having scored four tries, Martin Offiah jointly holds the record for the most tries scored in an England match.

References

Books

External links