Marriott Edgar

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Marriott Edgar (1880–1951), born George Marriot Edgar in Kirkcudbright, Scotland, was a poet, scriptwriter and comedian best known for writing many of the monologues performed by Stanley Holloway, particularly the 'Albert' series. In total he wrote sixteen monologues for Stanley Holloway, whilst Holloway himself wrote only five.

Family background[edit]

Edgar's parents were Jennifer née Taylor, a native of Dundee, and Richard Horatio Marriott Edgar (1847–1894), only son of Alice Marriott (1824–1900), proprietress of the Marriott family theatre troupe. Richard was born in Manchester, Lancashire, near Christmas 1847 as Richard Horatio Marriott; both his two sisters, Adeline Marriott (b. 1853) and Grace Marriott (b. 1858) were also born in Lancashire. Later all three children chose to take the surname of their mother's husband, Robert Edgar, whom she married in 1856.[1]

Richard and Jenny married in March 1875, with Richard being unaware that he had fathered an illegitimate namesake son, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace, with widowed actress Mrs Mary Jane "Polly" Richards, after a brief sexual encounter. Polly had invented an obligation in London to hide her pregnancy and give birth in secret on 1 April 1875, almost a month after Richard and Jenny married. This son became the famous journalist, novelist, playwright and screenplay writer Edgar Wallace.[2]

Richard and Jenny Taylor's children were Alice Marriott Edgar (b. 1876, London), twins Richard and Jennifer Marriott Edgar (b. 1878, London), following which they relocated to Scotland, where George was born, then they returned to Southern England and London once more, having Joseph Marriott Edgar in 1884 and Adeline Alice Edgar in 1886, both in London.

Early career[edit]

Little is recorded of George Marriott Edgar's early career, but he was talented performer, poet and writer. His first real successes began after he had been in the cast of The Co-Optimists and worked with Stanley Holloway.[3] They went to Hollywood at the start of the 1930s, Edgar having dropped his first name for his "professional" appellation of Marriott Edgar, and did meet his famous half-brother there.

Monologues[edit]

exterior of large mid-20th century public house
The Albert and the Lion pub, on Blackpool Promenade, near to the Tower

Holloway was already enjoying some success with the monologue format, with such classics as Sam, Pick Oop Tha' Musket. Edgar asked him if he had heard a story about a couple who had taken their son to the zoo, only to see the lad eaten by a lion. Holloway had indeed heard the story, and shortly afterwards Edgar supplied him with a script. The Lion and Albert became one of Holloway's most popular pieces, one of many he recorded beginning in 1930.[3]

The monologues were designed to be spoken rhythmically, with piano accompaniment which in many cases was also composed by Edgar.[4] The texts were published by Francis, Day & Hunter during the 1930s in three collections. All were illustrated by John Hassall, many of whose lively images also became classics. Edgar's compositions were

Some interest has been shown in the name "Wallace" for the lion which ate Albert. "Wallace" was the name of the first African lion to be bred in Britain, living from 1812 until 1838, and his name became a popular one for lions.[5]

The Lion and Albert and The Return of Albert have been translated into German under the titles Der Löwe und Albert and Albert kommt wieder, na klar! respectively.

Film scriptwriting[edit]

Between 1936 and 1944 Edgar worked for Gainsborough Pictures as a scriptwriter for a number of British films, all comedies except The Ghost Train, such as

Marriage and family[edit]

In 1904 in Brentford he married Mildred Williams.[6] They had a son, Hindle (1905–1984) who was an actor. Edgar died in Battle, East Sussex, 5 May 1951.

References[edit]

  1. ^ FreeBMD marriage record, June 1856
  2. ^ Lane, Margaret (1939). Edgar Wallace; the Biography of a Phenomenon. The Book Club. 
  3. ^ a b Cary Ginell on Stanley Holloway at classicsonline.com
  4. ^ for examples seeThe World of Stanley Holloway. Francis, Day & Hunter Ltd. 1972. 
  5. ^ Wallace the lion at ravishingbeasts.com
  6. ^ FreeBMD marriage record, December 1904

External links[edit]