Marilyn Maxwell

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Marilyn Maxwell
Marilyn Maxwell in High Barbaree trailer.jpg
from the trailer for
High Barbaree (1947)
BornMarvel Marilyn Maxwell
(1921-08-03)August 3, 1921
Clarinda, Iowa, U.S.
DiedMarch 20, 1972(1972-03-20) (aged 50)
Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
Cause of deathheart attack
Years active1942–1971
Spouse(s)John Conte (1944–1946)
Anders (Andy) McIntyre (1949–1950)
Jerry Davis (1954–1960)
 
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Marilyn Maxwell
Marilyn Maxwell in High Barbaree trailer.jpg
from the trailer for
High Barbaree (1947)
BornMarvel Marilyn Maxwell
(1921-08-03)August 3, 1921
Clarinda, Iowa, U.S.
DiedMarch 20, 1972(1972-03-20) (aged 50)
Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
Cause of deathheart attack
Years active1942–1971
Spouse(s)John Conte (1944–1946)
Anders (Andy) McIntyre (1949–1950)
Jerry Davis (1954–1960)

Marilyn Maxwell (August 3, 1921 – March 20, 1972), born Marvel Marilyn Maxwell, was an American actress and entertainer.

Noted for her blonde hair and sexually alluring persona, she appeared in several films and radio programs, and entertained the troops during World War II and the Korean War on USO tours with Bob Hope.[1]

Career[edit]

From the trailer for Stand By for Action

She started her professional entertaining career as a radio singer[2][3][4] while still a teenager before signing with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1942 as a contract player. Among the programs in which she appeared was The Abbott and Costello Show. The head of MGM, Louis B. Mayer, insisted she change the "Marvel" part of her real name. She dropped her first name and kept the middle.[1] Some of her film roles included Lost in a Harem (1944), Champion (1949), The Lemon Drop Kid (1951), and Rock-A-Bye Baby (1958). The song "Silver Bells" made its debut in The Lemon Drop Kid, sung by Maxwell and Hope.[5]

Maxwell appeared twice as a singer in the second season (1955–1956) of NBC's The Jimmy Durante Show. On May 16, 1957, she guest starred on NBC's The Ford Show, Starring Tennessee Ernie Ford.[6]

In the 1961-1962 television season, Maxwell played Grace Sherwood, owner of the diner on ABC's 26-episode Bus Stop, a drama about travelers passing through the fictitious town of Sunrise, Colorado.[7][8]

Personal Life[edit]

According to Arthur Marx's Bob Hope biography The Secret Life of Bob Hope, Hope's long-term affair with Maxwell was so open that the Hollywood community routinely referred to her as "Mrs. Bob Hope."

Death[edit]

In 1972, Maxwell's 15-year-old son arrived home from school and found her dead at the age of fifty of an apparent heart attack, after she had been treated for hypertension and pulmonary disease. Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, and Jack Benny were honorary pallbearers at her funeral.[9]

Filmography[edit]

Features[edit]

Short subjects[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wilson, Earl (28 September 1952). "Another Marilyn! Are There Two?". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Retrieved 5 November 2010. 
  2. ^ "Ted Weems and his Orchestra". RedHot Jazz.com. Retrieved 27 October 2010. 
  3. ^ Herzog, Buck (15 October 1962). "Along Amusement Row". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved 5 November 2010. 
  4. ^ "On the Stage". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 21 October 1939. Retrieved 13 April 2011. 
  5. ^ "People in the News-Hope Favors 'Silver Bells'". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. 14 November 1977. Retrieved 5 November 2010. 
  6. ^ "The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show". ctva.biz. Retrieved November 25, 2010. 
  7. ^ Humphrey, Hal (6 August 1961). "Marilyn Maxwell: At the Crossroads". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved 5 November 2010. 
  8. ^ Lowry, Cynthia (26 October 1961). "Heavy Fare Of Variety Shows On TV". Gettysburg Times. Retrieved 5 November 2010. 
  9. ^ "Marilyn Maxwell Obituary". Eickemeyer Funeral Chapel. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 

External links[edit]