Maria Butyrskaya

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Maria Butyrskaya
Personal information
Full nameMaria Viktorovna Butyrskaya
Country represented Russia
Born(1972-06-28) 28 June 1972 (age 40)
Moscow
Height1.60 m (5 ft 3 in)
Former coachElena Tchaikovskaya
Vladimir Kotin
Viktor Kudriavtsev
Vladimir Korolov
Irina Nifontova
Former choreographerElena Tchaikovskaya
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Maria Butyrskaya
Personal information
Full nameMaria Viktorovna Butyrskaya
Country represented Russia
Born(1972-06-28) 28 June 1972 (age 40)
Moscow
Height1.60 m (5 ft 3 in)
Former coachElena Tchaikovskaya
Vladimir Kotin
Viktor Kudriavtsev
Vladimir Korolov
Irina Nifontova
Former choreographerElena Tchaikovskaya

Maria Viktorovna Butyrskaya (Russian: Мария Викторовна Бутырская) (born 28 June 1972 in Moscow) is a Russian figure skater. She is the 1999 World champion in ladies' singles, becoming the oldest woman and the first Russian woman to win the title. She is a three-time European champion and in 2002, at age 29, became the oldest woman to win that title. She is a six-time Russian national champion. She placed fourth at the 1998 Winter Olympics and sixth at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Contents

Career

As a child, Butyrskaya was coached by Irina Nifontova for eight years.[1] After she decided to retire, Butyrskaya had a couple of coaches, one of whom told her she had no talent, and then contacted Vladimir Korolov.[1] He improved her compulsory figures but they were then dropped from competitions.[1] After Korolov moved to Greece, Butyrskaya was coached by Viktor Kudriavtsev for several years until he told her that she was strong technically but he could not help her mentally.[1] Her coach then became Elena Tchaikovskaya.[1]

Butyrskaya originally competed for the Soviet Union. After its dissolution, she began representing Russia.

As a teen, she was replaced by the Soviet Figure Skating Federation, and then lost coach after coach while struggling to finance her skating following the breakup of the Soviet Union. Her World Championship result in 1993 failed to qualify Russia for a spot in the 1994 Olympics. She came in 4th at the 1998 Olympics. Her persistence paid off when she defeated defending world champion Michelle Kwan at the 1999 World Championships. She received all first place ordinals in both the short and the long programs at the 1999 worlds, dominating the competition in an upset victory. She was never able to win a second world title, or an olympic medal, although she did win the short program at the 2000 Worlds, and captured her second bronze medal. She ended her amateur career at the 2002 World Championships, withdrawing from the competition after skating poorly in the qualifying round.

Butyrskaya was known for the beauty of her triple loop and true, outside-edge triple lutz. She was also known for a combination spin that involved clasping her arms and hands behind her back while transitioning to back camel, sit and scratch spins. She often participated in choreographing her programs and in designing her costumes. She often skated better in practice sessions than in competitive events, however, as she frequently succumbed to nervous tension when competing. In particular, Butyrskaya's car was blown up by the Russian mafia in December 1999, and speculation followed that the ensuing emotional distress caused her to lose the 1999 Russian Championships.

Besides the technical elements of figure skating, Butyrskaya won adulation for her artistry and ubridled femininity, which, especially toward the end of her professional career, was often in stark contrast to competitors half her age. She herself described her skating style as "a Woman on the ice". In 2000, the New York Times described her short program (Sarah Brightman's Scene d'Amour) as "flowing, lyrical skating...a performance of rare elegance and beauty."

Personal life

Butyrskaya's parents divorced after the birth of her younger brother.[2]

In summer 2006, Butyrskaya married a hockey player, Vadim Khomitski.[3] As of 2010, he plays in Russia for Khimik's successor team Atlant Moscow Oblast. He is 10 years younger than her. [1] On 16 April 2007, Butyrskaya and Khomitski welcomed their first child, a son named Vladislav.[4] At his birth, he weighed-in at 7.7 pounds and was 20 inches long. On 3 June 2009, their second child, a daughter, was born.[5] After ending her career, Butyrskaya began coaching, working primarily with young skaters.[3] She is based at the Olympic Reserve Skating School in Moscow.[4]

Programs

SeasonShort programFree skating
2001–2002[6]Melody of the White Nights (soundtrack)
by Isaac Schwartz
Tale of Wandering
by Alfred Schnittke

Results

Event1990–911991–921992–931993–941994–951995–961996–971997–981998–991999–002000–012001–02
Winter Olympics4th6th
World Championships29th4th5th3rd1st3rd4thWD
European Championships5th4th7th3rd4th1st1st2nd2nd1st
Russian Championships1st2nd1st1st1st1st1st2nd3rd2nd
Soviet Championships3rd
Grand Prix Final7th4th3rd2nd3rd4th4th
Skate America10th1st
Skate Canada International1st2nd
Sparkassen Cup7th6th8th2nd1st1st1st
Trophée Lalique5th2nd1st1st1st1st
NHK Trophy5th5th1st2nd1st
Finlandia Trophy4th1st
Karl Schäfer Memorial3rd
Nebelhorn Trophy3rd3rd
Piruetten8th
WD = Withdrew

References

External links