Manchester Township, New Jersey

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Manchester Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Manchester
Nickname(s): The Great Pine City
Map of Manchester Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Manchester Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°57′20″N 74°22′32″W / 39.955518°N 74.375563°W / 39.955518; -74.375563Coordinates: 39°57′20″N 74°22′32″W / 39.955518°N 74.375563°W / 39.955518; -74.375563[1][2]
CountryUnited States
stateNew Jersey
CountyOcean
IncorporatedApril 6, 1865
Government[5]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • MayorMichael Fressola (term ends June 30, 2014)[3]
 • ClerkSabina T. Skibo[4]
Area[2]
 • Total82.694 sq mi (214.177 km2)
 • Land81.620 sq mi (211.395 km2)
 • Water1.074 sq mi (2.782 km2)  1.30%
Area rank9th of 566 in state
3rd of 33 in county[2]
Elevation[6]154 ft (47 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total43,070
 • Estimate (2012[11])43,043
 • Rank45th of 566 in state
5th of 33 in county[12]
 • Density527.7/sq mi (203.7/km2)
 • Density rank442nd of 566 in state
28th of 33 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes08733 and 08759[13][14]
Area code(s)732[15]
FIPS code3402943140[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID0882077[18][2]
Websitemanchestertwp.com
 
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Manchester Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Manchester
Nickname(s): The Great Pine City
Map of Manchester Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Manchester Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°57′20″N 74°22′32″W / 39.955518°N 74.375563°W / 39.955518; -74.375563Coordinates: 39°57′20″N 74°22′32″W / 39.955518°N 74.375563°W / 39.955518; -74.375563[1][2]
CountryUnited States
stateNew Jersey
CountyOcean
IncorporatedApril 6, 1865
Government[5]
 • TypeFaulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • MayorMichael Fressola (term ends June 30, 2014)[3]
 • ClerkSabina T. Skibo[4]
Area[2]
 • Total82.694 sq mi (214.177 km2)
 • Land81.620 sq mi (211.395 km2)
 • Water1.074 sq mi (2.782 km2)  1.30%
Area rank9th of 566 in state
3rd of 33 in county[2]
Elevation[6]154 ft (47 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total43,070
 • Estimate (2012[11])43,043
 • Rank45th of 566 in state
5th of 33 in county[12]
 • Density527.7/sq mi (203.7/km2)
 • Density rank442nd of 566 in state
28th of 33 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes08733 and 08759[13][14]
Area code(s)732[15]
FIPS code3402943140[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID0882077[18][2]
Websitemanchestertwp.com

Manchester Township is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. The township is noted for containing the Lakehurst Naval Air Station, the site of the infamous Hindenburg disaster of May 6, 1937. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 43,070,[7][8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 4,142 (+10.6%) from the 38,928 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,952 (+8.2%) from the 35,976 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The 2010 population was the highest recorded in any decennial census.

Manchester Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 6, 1865, from portions of Dover Township (now Toms River Township). Portions of the township were taken to form Lakehurst on April 7, 1921.[20]

Cedar Glen Lakes (with a 2010 Census population of 1,421[21]), Cedar Glen West (1,267[22]), Crestwood Village (7,907[23]), Leisure Knoll (2,490[24]), Leisure Village West (3,493[25]), Pine Lake Park (8,707[26]) and Pine Ridge at Crestwood (2,369[27]) are all census-designated places and unincorporated communitys located within Manchester Township.[28][29][30] Leisure Village West-Pine Lake Park had been a combined CDP through the 2000 United States Census and was split as of the 2010 enumeration.[30]

Geography[edit]

Manchester Township is located at 39°57′20″N 74°22′32″W / 39.955518°N 74.375563°W / 39.955518; -74.375563 (39.955518,-74.375563). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 82.694 square miles (214.177 km2), of which, 81.620 square miles (211.395 km2) of it was land and 1.074 square miles (2.782 km2) of it (1.30%) was water.[1][2]

The township completely surrounds the independent borough of Lakehurst.

Manchester's largest development, Pine Lake Park, is known for its man-made lake, Pine Lake, built in the 1970s.[31]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
CensusPop.
18701,102
18801,057−4.1%
18901,0570%
19001,033−2.3%
19101,1127.6%
19201,034−7.0%
19301,009*−2.4%
1940918−9.0%
19501,75891.5%
19603,779115.0%
19707,55099.8%
198027,987270.7%
199035,97628.5%
200038,9288.2%
201043,07010.6%
Est. 201243,043[11]−0.1%
Population sources:
1870-2000[32] 1870-1920[33]
1870[34][35] 1880-1890[36]
1890-1910[37] 1910-1930[38]
1930-1990[39] 2000[40][41] 2010[7][8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 43,070 people, 22,840 households, and 11,694 families residing in the township. The population density was 527.7 inhabitants per square mile (203.7 /km2). There were 25,886 housing units at an average density of 317.2 per square mile (122.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 92.00% (39,623) White, 3.84% (1,654) Black or African American, 0.09% (38) Native American, 1.78% (768) Asian, 0.02% (10) Pacific Islander, 1.11% (479) from other races, and 1.16% (498) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.79% (2,062) of the population.[8]

There were 22,840 households of which 9.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.8% were non-families. 45.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 36.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.85 and the average family size was 2.55.[8]

In the township, 10.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 3.7% from 18 to 24, 12.6% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 50.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 65.1 years. For every 100 females there were 74.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 71.9 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $37,942 (with a margin of error of +/- $1,492) and the median family income was $54,114 (+/- $1,831). Males had a median income of $51,366 (+/- $2,772) versus $39,427 (+/- $3,352) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,264 (+/- $754). About 4.2% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.9% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[42]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 38,928 people, 20,688 households, and 10,819 families residing in the township. The population density was 471.3 people per square mile (182.0/km²). There were 22,681 housing units at an average density of 274.6 per square mile (106.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.34% White, 3.06% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.87% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.63% of the population.[40][41]

There were 20,688 households out of which 9.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 5.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.7% were non-families. 45.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 39.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.85 and the average family size was 2.53.[40][41]

In the township the population was spread out with 10.7% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 13.4% from 25 to 44, 17.8% from 45 to 64, and 54.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 68 years. For every 100 females there were 73.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 70.1 males.[40][41]

The median income for a household in the township was $29,525, and the median income for a family was $43,363. Males had a median income of $41,181 versus $30,523 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,409. About 3.0% of families and 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.[40][41]

Transportation[edit]

Route 70 passes through the heart of the township while Route 37 goes through in the east. CR 530 travels along Route 70 and then veers off to the east, while CR 539 goes from north to south. In addition, both CR 547 and CR 571 run through the northeastern part.

No limited access roads run through the municipality, but the closest ones are accessible in neighboring communities such as the Garden State Parkway in Toms River, Berkeley and Lacey townships and Inetrstate 195 in Jackson Township.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Manchester Township is governed within the Faulkner Act under the Mayor-Council (Plan 6) system of municipal government, as enacted by direct petition as of July 1, 1990.[43] The Township is governed by a Mayor and a five-member Township Council. Councilmembers are elected on an at-large, non-partisan basis to serve four-year staggered terms with either two or three council seats up for election every other year, with the mayoral seat up for vote at the same time that two council seats are up for vote.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Manchester Township is Michael Fressola, whose term of office ends on June 30, 2014.[44] Fressola is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition,[45] a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Members of the Township Council are Council President Craig Wallis (2014), Council Vice President Brendan Weiner (2014), Charles L. Frattini, Sr. (2016), Samuel F. Fusaro (2016), James A. Vaccaro, Sr. (2016).[46][47][48][49]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Manchester Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[50] and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district.[9][51][52] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Manchester Township had been in the 9th state legislative district.[53]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[54] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[55][56] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[57][58]

The 10th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township).[59] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[60] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[61]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[62] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2013, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, term ends December 31, 2013),[63] Freeholder Deputy Director James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2013),[64] John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[65] Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[66] and Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; Toms River, 2014).[67][68][69] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella,[70] Sheriff William L. Polhemus[71] and Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran.[72]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 31,380 registered voters in Manchester Township, of which 8,336 (26.6%) were registered as Democrats, 9,606 (30.6%) were registered as Republicans and 13,424 (42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 14 voters registered to other parties.[73] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 72.9% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 81.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[73][74]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 56.2% of the vote here (14,368 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.2% (10,533 votes) and other candidates with 1.5% (372 votes), among the 25,569 ballots cast by the township's 33,796 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.7%.[75] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.6% of the vote here (13,652 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 42.9% (10,537 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (235 votes), among the 24,572 ballots cast by the township's 32,133 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.5.[76]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.9% of the vote here (11,988 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 30.4% (5,796 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 4.7% (896 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (177 votes), among the 19,070 ballots cast by the township's 32,422 registered voters, yielding a 58.8% turnout.[77]

Education[edit]

The Manchester Township School District serves students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[78]) are Manchester Township Elementary School[79] (grades PreK-5; 582 students), Ridgeway Elementary School[80] (PreK-5; 524) and Whiting Elementary School[81] (K-5; 269) all feed into Manchester Township Middle School[82] (grades 6-8; 673), and then to Manchester Township High School[83] (9-12; 1,168).[84][85] Students from neighboring Lakehurst attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Lakehurst School District.[84] As of 2012, Lakehurst has been considering the possibility of sending its students to Jackson Liberty High School, as part of a prospective agreement with the Jackson School District under which students would gain access to a broader range of academic programs and which could result in annual savings of $400,000 per year off of the $2 million that the Lakehurst district spends annually for the 150 students it sends to the Manchester district.[86][87]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Manchester Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Township Clerk, Manchester Township. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University, April 2006, p. 49.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Manchester, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c "DataUniverse - 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Manchester township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Manchester township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Manchester, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Manchester, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 204. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Cedar Glen Lakes CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Cedar Glen West CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  23. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Crestwood Village CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  24. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Leisure Knoll CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  25. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Leisure Village West CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  26. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Pine Lake Park CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  27. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Pine Ridge at Crestwood CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  28. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  29. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  30. ^ a b New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), p. III-4. United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 30, 2012. "New CDPs: Leisure Village West (formed from part of deleted Leisure Village West-Pine Lake Park CDP); Pine Lake Park (formed from part of deleted Leisure Village West-Pine Lake Park CDP and additional area); Deleted CDPs: Leisure Village West-Pine Lake Park (split to form Leisure Village West CDP and part of Pine Lake Park CDP)"
  31. ^ "Big town or small borough: Both offer lots of living", Asbury Park Press, November 10, 2005. Accessed May 12, 2007.
  32. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  33. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  34. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 280, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed December 30, 2012. "Manchester contained in 1870, 1,103 inhabitants."
  35. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  36. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  37. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  38. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  39. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Manchester township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  41. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Manchester township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  42. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Manchester township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  43. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  44. ^ Mayor, Manchester Township. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  45. ^ "Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members". 
  46. ^ Town Council, Manchester Township. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  47. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Manchester Township. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  48. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 6-7. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  49. ^ Township of Manchester, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  50. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  51. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  52. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  54. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  55. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  56. ^ via Associated Press. "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in", NJ.com, October 31, 2013. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  57. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  62. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2012.
  63. ^ Freeholder Director John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  64. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  65. ^ John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  66. ^ Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  67. ^ Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  68. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  69. ^ Freeholders 2013 Committee & Liaison Assignments, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  70. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  71. ^ County Sheriff William L. Polhemus, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  72. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  73. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  74. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  75. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  76. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  77. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  78. ^ Data for the Manchester Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 30, 2012.
  79. ^ Manchester Township Elementary School, Manchester Township School District. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  80. ^ Ridgeway Elementary School, Manchester Township School District. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  81. ^ Whiting Elementary School, Manchester Township School District. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  82. ^ Manchester Township Middle School, Manchester Township School District. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  83. ^ Manchester Township High School, Manchester Township School District. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  84. ^ a b About Our School District, Manchester Township School District. Accessed October 21, 2013. "We are also the receiving district for approximately 150 high school students from neighboring Lakehurst Borough."
  85. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Manchester Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  86. ^ A Feasibility Study on the Termination of the Sending-Receiving Agreement Between the Lakehurst Borough Board of Education and the Manchester Township Board of Education, Lakehurst School District, October 26, 2012. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  87. ^ Kyriakakis, Gregory. "Report: High School Switch Would Bring Tax Savings to Lakehurst, Potential Hike to Manchester; Study, which says Lakehurst students would have more educational opportunities, now available on Lakehurst Board of Education website", ManchesterPatch, October 16, 2012. Accessed October 21, 2013. "The report estimates that over five years Lakehurst would pay Jackson $2,078,170 less in tuition compared to Manchester.If the switch were to happen, Lakehurst, which typically sends about 150 high school students to Manchester, would save $415,634 per year. That would reduce taxes $0.17 per $100 of assessed valuation, according to the report."
  88. ^ Amsel, Michael. "Diplomacy From Whiting", Asbury Park Press, August 23, 2003. Accessed December 30, 2012. "MANCHESTER - As the new U.S. ambassador to Belarus, George A. Krol is determined to try and help the country develop 'a more secure, democratic and prosperous world' for the American people and the international community."
  89. ^ George A. Krol, Our Campaigns. Accessed December 24, 2007.
  90. ^ Clayton, Scott. "Monmouth's Charles Cox sets pace in boys track", Asbury Park Press, June 17, 2006. Accessed December 30, 2012. "In Cox's sights for his senior year will be the conference records of 46.81 for 400 meters, set by Olympian Andrew Valmon of Manchester, and 21.30 for 200 meters, held jointly by 1993 Monmouth grad Ty Adams and 1996 Jackson grad Lamar Grant, brother of Ocean star Tiffany."

External links[edit]