Mahonia trifoliolata

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Mahonia trifoliolata
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
Order:Ranunculales
Family:Berberidaceae
Genus:Mahonia
Species:M. trifoliolata
Binomial name
Mahonia trifoliolata
(Moric.) Fedde
Synonyms

Berberis trifoliolata Moric.[1]

 
Jump to: navigation, search
Mahonia trifoliolata
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
Order:Ranunculales
Family:Berberidaceae
Genus:Mahonia
Species:M. trifoliolata
Binomial name
Mahonia trifoliolata
(Moric.) Fedde
Synonyms

Berberis trifoliolata Moric.[1]

Mahonia trifoliolata is a species of flowering plant in the family Berberidaceae that is native to Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona in the United States and northern Mexico as far south as Durango.[1] Common names include Agarita, Agrito, Algerita, Currant-of-Texas, Wild Currant, and Chaparral Berry. Several authorities argue that this species should be included in the genus Berberis because it is able to hybridize with Berberis species.

Agarita is a rounded evergreen shrub that grows up to 6 ft (1.8 m) tall and wide. It is low maintenance, drought tolerant, and has a very high heat tolerance. The fruit is a red berry used in jellies, and the yellow flowers grow in clusters. The foliage is gray-green, and the leaflets have sharp points at the ends.

Uses[edit]

The bright red edible fruits of the Agarita can be harvested around late April to early May. The fruits contain a slightly sweet and sour juice, when expelled the juice can be used to produce an Agarita wine or used simply as a fruit juice drink. The fruits also contain seeds and can be used to germinate new Agarita plants.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Taxon: Berberis trifoliolata Moric.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2008-11-03. Retrieved 2010-10-19. 
  2. ^ Fedde, Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 31(1-2): 96 96 1901.
  3. ^ Moric., Plantes de Nouvelle Amérique 113 1841.
  4. ^ Johnston, Journal of the Arnold Arboretum 31, 1950.
  5. ^ Laferriere, Madroño 38(1):59. 1991.

External links[edit]

Media related to Mahonia trifoliolata at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Mahonia trifoliolata at Wikispecies