Magda Gabor

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Magda Gabor
BornMagdolna Gábor
(1915-06-11)11 June 1915
Budapest, Austria-Hungary (present-day Budapest, Hungary)
Died6 June 1997(1997-06-06) (aged 81)
Palm Springs, California
Cause of deathRenal Failure
OccupationActress, socialite
Years active1937–1991
Spouse(s)Jan Bychowski
(m.1937-1946; divorced)
William Rankin
(m.1946-1947; divorced)
Sidney R. Warren
(m.1947-1950; divorced)
Arthur Gallucci
(m.1956-1957; divorced)
George Sanders
(m.1970-1971; annulled)
Tibor Heltai
(m.1972-1973; divorced)
ParentsVilmos Gábor
Jancsi Tilleman
 
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Magda Gabor
BornMagdolna Gábor
(1915-06-11)11 June 1915
Budapest, Austria-Hungary (present-day Budapest, Hungary)
Died6 June 1997(1997-06-06) (aged 81)
Palm Springs, California
Cause of deathRenal Failure
OccupationActress, socialite
Years active1937–1991
Spouse(s)Jan Bychowski
(m.1937-1946; divorced)
William Rankin
(m.1946-1947; divorced)
Sidney R. Warren
(m.1947-1950; divorced)
Arthur Gallucci
(m.1956-1957; divorced)
George Sanders
(m.1970-1971; annulled)
Tibor Heltai
(m.1972-1973; divorced)
ParentsVilmos Gábor
Jancsi Tilleman

Magdolna "Magda" Gabor (11 June 1915 – 6 June 1997)[1] was a Hungarian-born actress and socialite, and the elder sister of Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor.

Contents

Background

The eldest daughter of a jeweler, Jolie (died 1 April 1997), and a soldier, Vilmos Gábor (1884-1962), she was born in 1915 in Budapest.[2] Of Jewish descent, she is listed in Hungary: Jewish Names from the Central Zionist Archives, under her first married name, as Magda Bychowsky.[3] She stood 5'6" tall with red hair and gray eyes.[4]

During World War II, Gabor was reported to have been the fiancée of the Portuguese ambassador to Hungary, Dr. Carlos Almeida Afonseca de Sampayo Garrido; another source claims she was his mistress and another claims she was his aide.[5][6][7] After she fled to Portugal in 1944, following the Nazi occupation of Hungary, and, with Sampayo's assistance, she was reportedly the mistress of a Spanish nobleman, José Luis de Vilallonga.[8]

Gabor arrived in the United States in February 1946, from Natal, Brazil, intending to stay in the country for one year and apparently return to Lisbon, Portugal, where she was living. However, within a year of her arrival she married an American (see below) and remained in the country.[9]

Marriages

Gabor married six times. She was divorced five times, and one marriage was annulled. Her husbands, in chronological order, are:

Death

More than three decades after suffering an incapacitating stroke, Magda Gabor died on 6 June 1997, from renal failure, two months after the death of her mother,[19] and was interred in Desert Memorial Park in Cathedral City, California.

See also

Bibliography

References

  1. ^ The birth year of 1915 is cited in Hungary: Jewish Names from the Central Zionist Archives, an online database (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008). The information was accessed on ancestry.com on December 30, 2011.
  2. ^ Hungary: Jewish Names from the Central Zionist Archives, an online database (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008)
  3. ^ The database is online and based in Provo, Utah: The Generations Network, Inc.(2008). The information was accessed at Ancestry.com on December 30, 2011.
  4. ^ Gabor's physical attributes are stated on a February 11, 1946 airline passenger manifest, also accessed at Ancestry.com on December 30, 2011.
  5. ^ Relationship with Dr. Carlos Almeida Afonseca de Sampayo Garrido cited in "The Most Wives Club" article in Palm Springs Life (1996)
  6. ^ Relationship with Dr. Carlo de Sampayo also mentioned in an interview with Magda's sister, Zsa Zsa, as cited in Vanity Fair
  7. ^ Zsa Zsa Gábor: my story, written for me by Gerold Frank (World Publishing Co., 1960), p.161
  8. ^ Paul Preston, Doves of War: Four Women of Spain (UPNE, 2002), p. 106
  9. ^ Information stated on February 11, 1946 airline passenger manifest, accessed at ancestry.com on December 30, 2011.
  10. ^ Jan Ryszard Bychowski's career is cited in Poland Fights: Issues 53–76; (NY: American Friends of Polish Democracy, International Coordination Council, Polish Labor Group, 1944), and in Le Gouvernement polonais en exil et la persécution des juifs en France en 1942 (Cerf, 1997), pp. 208, 217
  11. ^ Gabor gave her name as Magda de Bychowsky and her marital status as divorced on a February 11, 1946 airline passenger manifest, accessed on ancestry.com, December 30, 2011; according to this form, she had left her city of residence (Lisbon, Portugal), where she lived at 17 Buenos Aires, and arrived in New York City to visit her family.
  12. ^ "The Billboard", August 23, 1947, p. 53
  13. ^ "Mrs. Magda Gabor Married", The New York Times, July 15, 1949
  14. ^ "Arthur Gallucci, Contractor Here; Chief of Building Concern, Active in Charities, Dies", The New York Times, January 24, 1967
  15. ^ "Magda Gabor Weds in Jersey", The New York Times, April 2, 1956
  16. ^ Jolie Gabor, with Cindy Adams, Jolie Gabor (Mason/Charter, 1975)
  17. ^ "Arthur Gallucci, Contractor Here—Chief of Building Concern, Active in Charities, Dies", The New York Times, January 24, 1967
  18. ^ a b "Notes on People", The New York Times, February 19, 1975
  19. ^ "Glamour and Goulash". Vanity Fair. July 2001. http://www.vanityfair.com/society/features/2001/07/zsa-zsa-200107. 

External links