M25 Tank Transporter

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M25 Tank Transporter
M26-tractor-194409.jpg
M26 tractor.
Place of origin United States
Service history
In service1941-1955
WarsWorld War II
Production history
DesignerKnuckey Truck Company
ManufacturerPacific Car & Foundry Co.
Specifications
Crew7

Armorfront 3/4 inch
sides, rear 1/4 inch
Main
armament
.50 cal M2 machine gun
EngineType 440 6-cylinder gasoline engine
240 hp
Suspension6x6
Speed26 mph
 
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M25 Tank Transporter
M26-tractor-194409.jpg
M26 tractor.
Place of origin United States
Service history
In service1941-1955
WarsWorld War II
Production history
DesignerKnuckey Truck Company
ManufacturerPacific Car & Foundry Co.
Specifications
Crew7

Armorfront 3/4 inch
sides, rear 1/4 inch
Main
armament
.50 cal M2 machine gun
EngineType 440 6-cylinder gasoline engine
240 hp
Suspension6x6
Speed26 mph

The M25 Tank Transporter was a heavy tank transporter and tank recovery vehicle used in World War II and beyond by the US Army.

Nicknamed the Dragon Wagon, the M25 was composed of a 6x6 armored tractor (M26) and 40-ton trailer (M15).

Contents

Development

In 1942 a new 40 ton semi-trailer tank transporter was required. This was to offer better off-road performance than the M9 24-small-wheel trailer, and greater capacity than the 30 ton 8-large-wheel Shelvoke and Drewry semi-trailers, then in use with the Diamond T tractor unit. This new trailer was designed by the Fruehauf Trailer Company (based in Detroit, MI).[1] A new tractor unit was required, as this heavier trailer was more than the Diamond T could cope with.

The M26 tractor was designed by the San Francisco-based Knuckey Truck Company. When Knuckey's production capacity proved insufficient the army awarded production to the Pacific Car & Foundry Co. of Seattle, Washington.

Designated TR-1 by Pacific Car, the 12-ton 6x6 M26 tractor was powered by a Type 440 240 bhp 6-cylinder gasoline engine developed exclusively for it by Hall-Scott (although also used to uprate the Diamond T). Some 2,100 Type 440s were built.[clarification needed] Baxter[1] notes "over 1,300" M26 and M26A1 being built.

Unusually, the tractor unit was fitted with both an armoured cab and two winches with a combined pull of 60 tons.[1] The intention was that as well as hauling the tank transporter semi-trailer, the tractor unit could itself be used for battlefield light recovery work.

A later unarmoured version of the M26 tractor was designated the M26A1. An experimental ballast tractor conversion was experimented with by the British FVPE[1]

Service

The M26 entered service with the US Army in Europe in 1944-45.

U.S. Nomenclature

In the nomeclature system used by the U.S Army Ordnance Corps Supply Catalog this vehicle is referred as the G160.

Specifications

Users

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Baxter, Brian S. (1989). Breakdown: A History of Recovery Vehicles in the British Army. HMSO, for REME Museum. p. 51. ISBN 0-11-290456-4. 

Further reading

External links

See also