M. William Bray

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For other people named William Bray or Bill Bray, see William Bray (disambiguation).

M. William Bray (September 25, 1889, Churubusco, Clinton County, New York – January 17, 1961) was an American lawyer and politician. He was Lieutenant Governor of New York from 1933 to 1938.

Life[edit]

He was the son of John Bray and Hannah Bray. He graduated from Union College in 1911, and from Albany Law School in 1914. He commenced practice in Utica, New York.

In 1924, he became Chairman of the Oneida County Democratic Committee, and was Chairman of the New York State Democratic Committee from 1928 to 1930. He was a delegate to the 1928, 1932, 1940 and 1948 Democratic National Conventions.

In 1932, Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, former Governor Al Smith and Party State Chairman James A. Farley forced the nomination of Herbert H. Lehman for governor, over the opposition of Tammany Hall and its allies. As a peace offering, Farley permitted Tammany to choose the candidate for lieutenant governor, and Bray was nominated. Lehman and Bray were renominated and reelected in 1934 and in 1936. In 1938, Bray was dumped from the ticket in favor of Lehman's counsel Charles Poletti.

Before Governor Lehman left office in 1942, he appointed Bray to the New York Public Service Commission. In later years, Bray served as a Referee in Bankruptcy and, in 1950, as President of the New York State Bar Association.

1932 New York State Democratic Ticket[edit]

1934 New York State Democratic Ticket[edit]

1936 New York State Democratic Ticket[edit]

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Edwin Corning
New York State Democratic Committee Chairman
August 1928 – 1930
Succeeded by
James A. Farley
Political offices
Preceded by
Herbert H. Lehman
Lieutenant Governor of New York
1933 - 1938
Succeeded by
Charles Poletti