Ludwigsburg

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Ludwigsburg
Ludwigsburg Palace, inner courtyard

Coat of arms
Ludwigsburg is located in Germany
Ludwigsburg
Coordinates: 48°53′51″N 9°11′32″E / 48.89750°N 9.19222°E / 48.89750; 9.19222Coordinates: 48°53′51″N 9°11′32″E / 48.89750°N 9.19222°E / 48.89750; 9.19222
CountryGermany
StateBaden-Württemberg
Admin. regionStuttgart
DistrictLudwigsburg
Government
 • MayorWerner Spec
Area
 • Total43.33 km2 (16.73 sq mi)
Elevation293 m (961 ft)
Population (2012-12-31)[1]
 • Total88,200
 • Density2,000/km2 (5,300/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes71634–71642
Dialling codes07141
Vehicle registrationLB
Websitewww.ludwigsburg.de
 
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Ludwigsburg
Ludwigsburg Palace, inner courtyard

Coat of arms
Ludwigsburg is located in Germany
Ludwigsburg
Coordinates: 48°53′51″N 9°11′32″E / 48.89750°N 9.19222°E / 48.89750; 9.19222Coordinates: 48°53′51″N 9°11′32″E / 48.89750°N 9.19222°E / 48.89750; 9.19222
CountryGermany
StateBaden-Württemberg
Admin. regionStuttgart
DistrictLudwigsburg
Government
 • MayorWerner Spec
Area
 • Total43.33 km2 (16.73 sq mi)
Elevation293 m (961 ft)
Population (2012-12-31)[1]
 • Total88,200
 • Density2,000/km2 (5,300/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes71634–71642
Dialling codes07141
Vehicle registrationLB
Websitewww.ludwigsburg.de

Ludwigsburg is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, about 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) north of Stuttgart city centre, near the river Neckar. It is the largest and primary city of the Ludwigsburg district with about 87,000 inhabitants. It is situated within the Stuttgart Region, and the district is part of the administrative region (Regierungsbezirk) of Stuttgart.

History[edit]

The middle of Neckarland, where Ludwigsburg lies, was settled in the stone and bronze ages. Numerous archaeological sites from the Hallstatt period remain in the city and surrounding area.[2]

Towards the end of the 1st century, the area was occupied by the Romans. They pushed the Limes further to the east around 150 and controlled the region until 260, when the Alamanni occupied the Neckarland. Evidence of the Alamanni settlement can be found in grave sites in the city today.

View of the upper grounds of Ludwigsburg Palace.
Hunting Lodge Favorite.
Castle Monrepos.

The origins of Ludwigsburg date from the beginning of the 18th century (1718–1723) when the largest baroque castle in Germany, Ludwigsburg Palace was built by Duke Eberhard Ludwig von Württemberg. Originally, the Duke planned to just build one country home (albeit a palace), which he began building in 1704. However, the examples of other princes fostered a desire to project his absolutist power by establishing a city. To the baroque palace, he added a hunting lodge and country seat, called Schloss Favorite (1713–1728), and the Seeschloss (castle on the lake) Monrepos (1764–1768).[3]

A settlement began near the palace in 1709 and a town charter was granted on 3 April 1718. That same year, Ludwigsburg became a bailiff's seat, which eventually became the rural district of Ludwigsburg in 1938.

In the years between 1730 and 1800, the royal seat of residence changed back and forth several times between Stuttgart and Ludwigsburg. In 1800, Württemberg was occupied by France under Napoleon Bonaparte and was forced into an alliance. In 1806, the Kurfürst (Prince-Elector) Friedrich was made king of Württemberg by Napoleon. In 1812, the Württembergish army was raised in Ludwigsburg for Napoleon's Russian campaign. Of the 15,800 Württemberg soldiers who served, just a few hundred returned.

In 1921, Ludwigsburg became the largest garrison in southwest Germany. In 1945, Ludwigsburg was made a "Kreisstadt" (urban district), and later, when the Baden-Württemberg municipal code took effect on 1 April 1956, the city was named a major urban district. In 1956 the tradition of the German garrison town was taken up again by the Bundeswehr, Germany's federal armed forces.

2004 was the 300th birthday of Residenzschloss Ludwigsburg, celebrated by the opening of the Baroque Gallery and the Ceramic Museum in the Residenzschloss.

Jews and World War II[edit]

Jewish families began living in Ludwigsburg during the 19th century and in 1884, a synagogue was built on Solitudestraße. The synagogue was later destroyed by storm troopers during the pogrom of November 1938.[4] In 1988, the perimeter of the structure was marked out in plaster on the site. A 1959 memorial and newer memorial plaques commemorate the Jewish Holocaust victims and extol human rights.[5]

In 1940, a Nazi propaganda film, Jud Süß, was filmed in Ludwigsburg. The film was based on a historical figure, Joseph Süß Oppenheimer, who was executed in Stuttgart in 1738; Oppenheimer lived in Ludwigsburg.[6][7]

During World War II, the city suffered moderate damage compared to other German cities. There were 1500 deaths. It was the home of the prisoner-of-war camp Stalag V-A from October 1939 till April 1945. After the war, there was a large displaced persons camp which housed several thousand mainly Polish displaced persons until about 1948. After 1945 until the middle of 1946, there was also an allied internment camp for war criminals in Ludwigsburg and the U.S. Army maintained the Pattonville barracks on the edge of town, large enough to have its own American high school. The land was returned to Germany in 1994.

On 27 September 2008, the first 12 Stolpersteine were laid in Ludwigsburg.[8] They are part of a project by artist Gunter Demnig to memorialize individuals who perished under Nazi persecution. Demnig was back in Ludwigsburg on 7 October 2009 to install more Stolpersteine.[9]

Business and industry[edit]

The North-South Powerline, includes a large transformer station Ludwigsburg-Hoheneck, built in 1926, which still exists today. It is a central junction in the power lines of Baden-Württemberg to this day.

On 5 October 1957, the first 380kV-powerline in Germany between the transformer station Ludwigsburg-Hoheneck and Rommerskirchen went into service.

Local businesses[edit]

City government[edit]

The town council has 40 members. The last local election was on 7 June 2009. The voter participation was 45.35%. The results of the election were:

PartySeats%
CDU1024.80%
SPD818.73%
Freie Wähler717.82%
The Greens717.48%
FDP49.79%
LUBU25.32%
Die Linke13.66%
REP12.41%

Coat of arms[edit]

Ludwisburg emblem.

The Coat of Arms is blue with an angular red flagpole and golden banner depicting a large black eagle with red beak and talons.

The city banner is black and yellow and was introduced in 1750.

Public institutions[edit]

In 1966, the Pädagogische Hochschule, a teaching college, and the "Staatliche Sportschule Ludwigsburg" (State Sports School) were opened. In 1991, the national film school Filmakademie Baden-Württemberg was established in Ludwigsburg,[10] which won several national and international awards.[11]

Other educational institutions[edit]

Sports[edit]

Ludwigsburg has six teams in the top level of professional sports. They are EnBW Ludwigsburg (Basketball), both formations A and B of the dance team (1. Tanzclub Ludwigsburg), the Latin-formation (TSC Ludwigsburg), the Hockey-Club Ludwigsburg 1912 e. V. and the riflery team of Ludwigsburg. Additionally there are numerous amateur clubs for various sports.

Districts[edit]

Ludwigsburg consists of following districts:

Neighbouring towns[edit]

The following towns are neighbouring towns of Ludwigsburg, starting north of the city and going clockwise: Freiberg am Neckar, Benningen am Neckar, Marbach am Neckar, Erdmannhausen, Affalterbach, Remseck am Neckar, Kornwestheim, Möglingen, Asperg und Tamm.

Population growth[edit]

YearPopulation
1718600
17262,442
177411,607
18035,248
3 Dec 1843 ¹10,726
1 Dec 1871 ¹11,785
1 Dec 1875 ¹13,800
1 Dec 1880 ¹14,700
1 Dec 1885 ¹16,187
1 Dec 1890 ¹17,418
2 Dec 1895 ¹19,311
1 Dec 1900 ¹19,436
YearPopulation
1 Dec 1905 ¹22,585
1 Dec 1910 ¹24,926
1 Dec 1916 ¹19,377
5 Dec 1917 ¹19,206
8 Oct 1919 ¹23,303
16 Jun 1925 ¹28,861
16 Jun 1933 ¹34,135
17 May 1939 ¹43,505
31 Dec 194538,804
29 Oct 1946 ¹49,635
13 Sep 1950 ¹58,489
25 Sep 1956 ¹69,535
YearPopulation
6 Jun 1961 ¹73,512
31 Dec 196576,555
27 May 1970 ¹78,019
31 Dec 197583,622
31 Dec 198081,589
31 Dec 198576,973
25 May 1987 ¹78,884
31 Dec 199082,343
31 Dec 199586,810
31 Dec 200086,897
31 Dec 200587,673
30 Jun 200687,295

¹ Population census

Notable people[edit]

Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg, enrolled the young Friedrich Schiller in the Karlsschule Stuttgart (an elite military academy he had founded) in 1773, where Schiller eventually studied medicine. The Duke was very demanding of his students, and Schiller's childhood was a lonely and unhappy one, but he was greatly enriched by the excellent education he received. It was there that he wrote his first play, Die Räuber ("The Robbers"), about a group of naïve revolutionaries and their tragic failure.

Leopold Mozart visited Württemberg with his son, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in July 1763 and said, "Ludwigsburg is a very special town."[12]

Present and former residents of Ludwigsburg[edit]

People born in Ludwigsburg[edit]

Twin towns (sister cities)[edit]

Ludwigsburg is twinned with:

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [Statistisches Bundesamt – Gemeinden in Deutschland mit Bevölkerung am 31.12.2012 (XLS-Datei; 4,0 MB) (Einwohnerzahlen auf Grundlage des Zensus 2011) "Gemeinden in Deutschland mit Bevölkerung am 31.12.2012"]. Statistisches Bundesamt (in German). 12 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Hans-Peter Stika. "Traces of a possible Celtic brewery in Eberdingen-Hochdorf, Kreis Ludwigsburg, southwest Germany" Vegetation History and Archaeobotany Volume 5, Numbers 1–2 (June, 1996). Accessed March 4, 2010
  3. ^ Official website of the Ludwigsburg Palace
  4. ^ Jewish History of Ludwigsburg Official website of Alemania Judaica. Accessed March 3, 2010
  5. ^ Gedenkstätten für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus. Eine Dokumentation. (Memorial Sites for the Victims of Nazism. A Documentary Report) Volume I, Bonn 1995, page 56, ISBN 3-89331-208-0 (German)
  6. ^ Description of cultural tour through Ludwigsburg "Guided City Tours Ludwigsburg." Accessed March 3, 2010
  7. ^ German Propaganda Archive: Jud Süss. Eight-page flyer from Illustrierter Film-Kurier magazine (1940). Accessed March 4, 2010
  8. ^ "Erinnerung an zwölf Nazi-Opfer" Ludwigsburger Kreiszeitung (October 3, 2008) Retrieved June 12, 2010 (German)
  9. ^ "Chronik: October 2009" Stolperstein, official website. Retrieved June 12, 2010 (German)
  10. ^ "The History of the Baden-Württemberg Film Academy"
  11. ^ http://www.filmakademie.de/en/festivals-awards-presentations/
  12. ^ "Ludwigsburg Travel Guide" world66.com Accessed March 4, 2010
  13. ^ Résumé of President Horst Köhler Official presidential website. Retrieved March 2, 2010
  14. ^ Sophie Scholl in Ludwigsburg. Website about Sophie Scholl's childhood years in Ludwigsburg. Accessed March 4, 2010

External links[edit]