Lox

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Lox
Lox on Bagel, Atlanta GA.jpg
Lox on bagel
CourseBreakfast, Lunch
Place of originUnited States
Region or stateNew York, New Jersey, Chicago
Main ingredientsLox, cream cheese, bagel
Cookbook:Lox  Lox
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with smoked salmon or Liquid oxygen.
For other uses, see Lox (disambiguation).
Lox
Lox on Bagel, Atlanta GA.jpg
Lox on bagel
CourseBreakfast, Lunch
Place of originUnited States
Region or stateNew York, New Jersey, Chicago
Main ingredientsLox, cream cheese, bagel
Cookbook:Lox  Lox
Lox and cream cheese sandwich

Lox is a fillet of brined salmon. Traditionally, lox is served on a bagel with cream cheese, and is usually garnished with tomato, sliced red onion, and sometimes capers, which diners may or may not opt to add to the bagel. Some American preparations of scrambled eggs or frittata include a mince of lox and onion.

Etymology[edit]

The American English word lox[1] is derived from the Yiddish word for salmon, Laks (cf. German "Lachs"), which may ultimately derive from the Indo-European word for salmon, *laks-.[2] The word lox has cognates in numerous European languages that also derive from one of the Indo-European languages.

Similar products[edit]

Other similar brined and smoked fish products are also popular in delis and fish stores, particularly in Chicago & the New York City boroughs, such as chubs, sable (smoked cod), smoked sturgeon, smoked whitefish, and kippered herring.

See also[edit]

References[edit]