Lovely to Look At

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Lovely to Look At
Directed byMervyn LeRoy
Vincente Minnelli (uncredited)
Produced byJack Cummings
Music byCarmen Dragon and Saul Chaplin
CinematographyGeorge J. Folsey
Edited byJohn McSweeney Jr.
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release datesJuly 1952
Running time103 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$2,813,000[1]
Box office$3,774,000[1]
 
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Lovely to Look At
Directed byMervyn LeRoy
Vincente Minnelli (uncredited)
Produced byJack Cummings
Music byCarmen Dragon and Saul Chaplin
CinematographyGeorge J. Folsey
Edited byJohn McSweeney Jr.
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release datesJuly 1952
Running time103 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$2,813,000[1]
Box office$3,774,000[1]

Lovely to Look At, an adaptation of the Broadway musical Roberta, is a 1952 MGM musical film directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Other than keeping the musical score and retaining the idea of a dress shop being inherited by someone, it bears almost no resemblance to the show or 1935 film.

Plot[edit]

Tony Naylor, Al Marsh and Jerry Ralby are looking for backers for their new Broadway show. They have just run out of options when Al gets a letter from his Aunt's attorneys and finds he is a part-owner of a dress salon in Paris. Thinking to sell his share, he, Jerry, and Tony fly to Paris, only to find the shop is almost bankrupt. There they also find Stephanie and Clarisse, who own the other shares of the business. Tony is able to convince the anxious creditors to back a fashion show, hoping to put the shop back on top. As the plot progresses, Tony is torn between his growing affection for Stephanie and his desire to finance his show. Meanwhile, Jerry falls for Clarisse, and Al has a crush on Stephanie. Eventually, Al goes for Bubbles, who has followed the boys from New York.

Cast[edit]

Songs[edit]

The music was written by Jerome Kern.

Reception[edit]

According to MGM records the film earned $2,571,000 in the US and Canada and $1,203,000 elsewhere, resulting in an overall loss of $735,000.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study .
  2. ^ Awards for Roberta (1935) at Internet Movie Database

External links[edit]