Lou Angotti

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Lou Angotti
Born(1938-01-16) January 16, 1938 (age 76)
Toronto, ON, CAN
Height5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Weight170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
PositionRight Wing
ShotRight
Played forNHL
Chicago Black Hawks
New York Rangers
Philadelphia Flyers
Pittsburgh Penguins
St. Louis Blues
WHA
Chicago Cougars
AHL
Rochester Americans
CHL
St. Louis Braves
Playing career1962–1975
 
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Lou Angotti
Born(1938-01-16) January 16, 1938 (age 76)
Toronto, ON, CAN
Height5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Weight170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
PositionRight Wing
ShotRight
Played forNHL
Chicago Black Hawks
New York Rangers
Philadelphia Flyers
Pittsburgh Penguins
St. Louis Blues
WHA
Chicago Cougars
AHL
Rochester Americans
CHL
St. Louis Braves
Playing career1962–1975

Louis Frederick Angotti (born January 16, 1938) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player and coach.

Angotti grew up in Toronto and played his junior hockey for the Toronto St. Michael's Majors. He then enrolled in Michigan Tech University where he earned an engineering degree while skating on powerful college clubs. He appeared in two NCAA championship games, losing the 1960 game while winning in 1962. He was MVP of both tournaments and was All-WCHA First Team for 1961–62. [1]

Angotti signed with the New York Rangers, playing two seasons with the minor league Rochester Americans before being called up to the big league club in 1964-65. Angotti quickly became known for his high-energy, speedy play. Over the next nine seasons, he would play with the Chicago Black Hawks, Philadelphia Flyers, Pittsburgh Penguins, and St. Louis Blues. He had his best offensive season in 1967-68 with the Flyers, when he scored 49 points while serving as the club's first ever captain. During his second stint with Chicago (from 1969 through 1973), he served as a key defensive component on a team that narrowly lost two Stanley Cup Final series.[2]

During his final season with the Blues in 1973-74, he was hired as coach after Jean-Guy Talbot was fired with 23 games remaining in the season. He retired to serve as head coach on a full time basis, but, after he was fired just 9 games into the next year, he returned to play hockey with the Chicago Cougars of the WHA. Angotti again served as head coach during the 1983-84 seasons, this time with the Pittsburgh Penguins. [3]

Angotti has also coached the New Brunswick Hawks, Erie Blades, and Baltimore Skipjacks of the AHL for one season each. He does periodic work on behalf of the Blackhawk Alumni Association.

Career statistics[edit]

  Regular Season Playoffs
SeasonTeamLeagueGPGAPtsPIMGPGAPtsPIM
1955–56Toronto St. Michael's MajorsOHA48661229840420
1956–57Toronto St. Michael's MajorsOHA521219312841234
1957–58Toronto St. Michael's MajorsOHA52231942729781510
1958–59Michigan Tech Huskies (JV)WCHA5109190
1959–60Michigan Tech HuskiesWCHA3018213930
1960–61Michigan Tech HuskiesWCHA2825174252
1961–62Michigan Tech HuskiesWCHA3128235150
1962–63Kitchener-Waterloo TigersOHA161972626
1962–63Rochester AmericansAHL391615311910000
1963–64Rochester AmericansAHL601530452821120
1964–65New York RangersNHL70981720
1965–66New York RangersNHL212242
1965–66St. Louis BravesCPHL8108184
1965–66Chicago Black HawksNHL30410141260002
1966–67Chicago Black HawksNHL6361218462132
1967–68Philadelphia FlyersNHL701237493570002
1968–69Pittsburgh PenguinsNHL7117203736
1969–70Chicago Black HawksNHL701226382580000
1970–71Chicago Black HawksNHL6591625191633169
1971–72Chicago Black HawksNHL65510152360000
1972–73Chicago Black HawksNHL7715223726163472
1973–74St. Louis BluesNHL511223359
1974–75Chicago CougarsWHA262579
NHL totals65310318628922865881617

Coaching record[edit]

TeamYearRegular seasonPost season
GWLTPtsDivision rankResult
St. Louis Blues1973-74234154(64)6th in WestMissed playoffs
St. Louis Blues1974-759252(84)2nd in SmytheFired
Pittsburgh Penguins1983-848016586386th in PatrickMissed playoffs
NHL Total112227812

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Reg Morelli




Bill Masterton
NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player
1960
Shared With
Bob Marquis
Barry Urbanski

1962
Succeeded by
Bill Masterton




Al McLean
Preceded by
Position created
Philadelphia Flyers captain
1967–68
Succeeded by
Ed Van Impe
Preceded by
Jean-Guy Talbot
Head coach of the St. Louis Blues
1974
Succeeded by
Lynn Patrick
Preceded by
Eddie Johnston
Head coach of the Pittsburgh Penguins
1983-84
Succeeded by
Bob Berry