Lonnie Smith

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Lonnie Smith
Lonniesmith1983.jpg
Left fielder
Born: (1955-12-22) December 22, 1955 (age 58)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 2, 1978 for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
August 10, 1994 for the Baltimore Orioles
Career statistics
Batting average.288
Home runs98
Runs batted in533
Stolen bases370
Teams
Career highlights and awards
 
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Lonnie Smith
Lonniesmith1983.jpg
Left fielder
Born: (1955-12-22) December 22, 1955 (age 58)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 2, 1978 for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
August 10, 1994 for the Baltimore Orioles
Career statistics
Batting average.288
Home runs98
Runs batted in533
Stolen bases370
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Lonnie Smith (born December 22, 1955 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. He made his debut for the Philadelphia Phillies on September 2, 1978 and later played for the St. Louis Cardinals, Kansas City Royals, Atlanta Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Baltimore Orioles. He overcame bouts with drug abuse to become one of the top base-stealers in baseball during the 1980s, with the seventh-most steals.[1] He played on five pennant-winning teams, three of which won the World Series.

Philadelphia Phillies[edit]

After brief trials with the Phillies in 1978 and 1979, Smith broke into the team's lineup in 1980, batting .339 in 100 games. The Phillies won the National League pennant and defeated the Kansas City Royals in the World Series. Smith's performance was strong enough for him to finish third in the Rookie of the Year balloting following the season. He continued to play well in the strike-shortened 1981 season, hitting .324.

St. Louis Cardinals[edit]

Smith was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in November 1981, for Lary Sorensen, in a deal which eventually netted the Phillies Bo Diaz.[2] Smith continued to hit well in 1982, and to have a good on-base percentage. In fact, 1982 was a high-water year for Smith in several different ways: Smith was in the MLB All-Star Game for the only time in his career in 1982. He had a batting average of .307, and on-base percentage of .381. He led the National League with 120 runs scored, which was the only time that he scored 100+ runs in a season during his baseball career. Smith also set career highs in 1982 with 592 at-bats, 182 hits, 35 doubles, and 257 total bases during the regular season. He also ranked second in the National league with a career-high 68 stolen bases on the basepaths, but he was also caught stealing a career-high 26 times, since the Cardinals' manager had ordered his fastest players to attempt to steal bases whenever possible as part of his strategy for winning.

All of the above pushed Smith all the way up to second place in voting for the regular-season National League Most Valuable Player for 1982. That season, the outfielder Dale Murphy of the Atlanta Braves won the National League MVP award, tying for the lead in runs batted in and walloping 36 home runs.

Smith batted a healthy .321 during the 1982 World Series, and he helped the Cardinals to defeat the Milwaukee Brewers ("Harvey's Wallbangers"), four games to three.

Smith continued to play well during 1983, batting .321 (which placed him second in the National League only to Bill Madlock's .323), but in just 130 games, to again draw some MVP votes. However, this baseball season was struck with his first bout with illicit drug abuse, which sidelined him for a month at mid-season during a highly publicized rehabilitation stint at the Hyland Center in St. Louis.[3][4]

Smith returned to the Cardinals after his time on the bench in 1983, and he remained with them through the end of the 1984 baseball season.

Kansas City Royals[edit]

Smith was traded to the Royals in exchange for outfielder John Morris on May 17, 1985. The Royals were able to fill their left field spot with Smith; they had lacked an everyday player since the departure of Amos Otis two years earlier. Smith's past met his present following the regular season, when he hit .333 in the 1985 World Series to lead the Royals to a seven-game upset of the favored Cardinals. Smith went on to have his best season in three years in 1986, but saw his playing time reduced during the 1987 season.

When Smith took the field in Game 1 of the 1985 World Series, he became the first and only player in MLB history to play in the World Series against a team that traded him away within the same season.

Atlanta Braves[edit]

In July 1987, Smith told the Kansas City Times that under his agreement with the commissioner of baseball, he was supposed to be tested six to eight times per-year but had not been tested so far during 1987. More so, he strongly disagreed with Commissioner Ueberroth that professional baseball was free from illicit drugs.[5] Following the 1987 season, Smith had trouble finding a new team to play with, and he came to think that then-Royals general manager John Schuerholz had blackballed him from the other baseball teams since the situation involved his testimony in the Pittsburgh drug trial two years earlier as indicated by ABC News.

By his own account, Smith was depressed and also addicted to cocaine when he considered murdering Schuerholz, and had even purchased a pistol for that purpose. However, Smith then had second thoughts about committing such a serious crime, and he dropped that idea entirely.[6]

During March of 1988, then-Atlanta Braves general manager Bobby Cox (who would be succeeded by Schuerholz during Smith's time in Atlanta) offered Smith a contract to play there. During Spring Training, he made it to the team's 25-man roster, but he batted just .237 in limited playing time that season. However, in 1989, he cracked the starting line-up for the Braves' outfield, and he went on to accomplish one of his best baseball seasons, ever. During that season, Smith had a batting average of .315, and also had a career-high total of 21 home runs. Smith also led the National League with a .415 on-base percentage. Smith finished 11th in the voting of N.L. Most Valuable Player, and he was awarded the MLB Comeback Player of the Year Award.

Smith continued to be a regular outfielder for the Braves during the next two baseball seasons, batting .305 in 1990 and .275 in 1991. Smith's play in 1991 helped the Braves move from last place in the National League West in 1990 up to winning the National League pennant 1991, and playing in the World Series for the first time since 1958, back when the Braves had Milwaukee, Wisconsin as their home city.

1991 World Series[edit]

Smith committed a baserunning blunder very late in the seventh game of the 1991 World Series, playing against the Minnesota Twins. Smith was on first base with no men out in the eighth inning of this scoreless (0 - 0) game. Then, the Braves' batter Terry Pendleton stuck a line-drive double to left field. It appeared that Smith should have been able to score following this hit, but as he was rounding second base, he stumbled momentarily, and he stopped at third base. Smith later stated that he had lost sight of the baseball against the ceiling of the Minnesota Metrodome stadium, but replays from the TV coverage of the game showed that the Twins' second baseman Chuck Knoblauch had deceived Smith by pretending to receive the baseball thrown in from the outfielder.[6]

Regardless of the cause, Smith advanced just to third base. Next, the bases became loaded, and then Smith was forced out at home plate in a double play. The Braves did not score a run during this team at-bat. The score remained (0 - 0), and that was how it remained at the end of the ninth inning.

The Twins went on to score one run in the bottom of the tenth inning, hence winning the game 1-0 and winning the World Series four games to three.

Retirement[edit]

Smith remained with the Braves through the end of the 1992 baseball season, and he helped the Braves win the National League pennant once again, though they lost the World Series four games to two against the Toronto Blue Jays.

Next, Smith departed from the Braves, and he signed up with the Pittsburgh Pirates, where he played one season, and then one more with the Baltimore Orioles, where he played mostly as just a pinch-hitter. Smith played in his final Major League Baseball game on August 10, 1994.

After retiring from pro baseball, Smith married once more, and he and his wife returned to Atlanta to reside. They became the parents of three children. Smith very briefly re-entered national attention in 2006, when he told a newspaper from Columbia, S.C., about his notion (then reversed it) to murder Schuerholz eighteen years earlier.[6]

Records and achievements[edit]

Nickname[edit]

Smith was branded with the nickname "Skates" due to his somewhat awkward footwork while playing the outfield in baseball. The baseball historian Bill James wrote about this nickname at some length. He wryly stated that Smith should have had a post-retirement career teaching (so-called) "defensive recovery and cost containment", since he had excelled at recovering from defensive difficulties in the outfield.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Who had the most stolen bases during the 1980s? | Answerbag.com
  2. ^ "Lonnie Smith to Card, Diaz to Phils in 3-team deal". Gettysburg Times. Nov 20, 1981. p. 6C. 
  3. ^ Falkner, David (20 July 1989). "The Comeback Of Lonnie Smith". The New York Times. Retrieved 23 January 2010. 
  4. ^ Bock, Hal (23 March 1984). "Lonnie Smith recalls nightmare of drugs," Associated Press (via The Southeast Missourian).
  5. ^ "Smith blast puts holes in baseball's alleged anti-drug abuse campaign". 
  6. ^ a b c Babb, Kent (5 November 2005). "Battle Scars". The State. pp. C1. 
  7. ^ Bill James, The 1986 Bill James Baseball Abstract, page 279.

External links[edit]