Liuhebafa

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Liu He Ba Fa Chuan
六 合 八 法 拳
Six Harmonies Eight Methods Boxing
Tuan.jpg
Also known asShuǐ Quán
水拳
Country of originChina China
CreatorChén Tuán 陳摶, also known as Chén Xīyí 陳希夷
 
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Note: The art is commonly abbreviated as LHBF, and often referred to by its Cantonese name: Lok Hap Baat Faat

Liu He Ba Fa Chuan
六 合 八 法 拳
Six Harmonies Eight Methods Boxing
Tuan.jpg
Also known asShuǐ Quán
水拳
Country of originChina China
CreatorChén Tuán 陳摶, also known as Chén Xīyí 陳希夷

Liuhebafachuan 六合八法拳; Pinyin: liùhébāfǎquán) (literally Six Harmonies Eight Methods Boxing) is a form of internal Chinese martial arts. It has been called "Xinyi Liuhebafa-" 心意六合八法拳 and is also referred to as "Water Boxing" (shuǐ quán 水拳) due to its principles.

History[edit]

The Song Dynasty Taoist sage Chen Tuan (Chén Tuán 陳摶, also known as Chén Xīyí 陳希夷) is often credited with its origin and development. He was associated with the Hua Shan Taoist Monastery on Mount Hua in Shaanxi Province.

The Liuhebafa form "Zhú Jī 築基" was taught in the late 1930s in Shanghai and Nanjing by Wu Yihui (1887–1958).[1][citation needed] It is said he had learned the art from three teachers: Yan Guoxing, Chen Guangdi, and Chen Helu.

Many of Wu Yihui's students had martial arts backgrounds and modified the form to merge it with their own knowledge. This is one of several explanations for its similarities with other martial arts such as Xingyiquan, Baguazhang, T'ai chi and Yiquan.

Six Harmonies and Eight Methods[edit]

The Six Harmonies and the Eight Methods are the guiding principles of Liuhebafa that give it its name.

Six Harmonies, 六合[edit]

  1. 體合於心 (Pinyin: tǐ hé yū xīn) Body and Mind Combine
  2. 心合於意 (xīn hé yū yì) Mind and Intent Combine
  3. 意合於氣 (yì hé yū qì) Intent and Chi Combine
  4. 氣合於神 (qì hé yū shén) Chi and Spirit Combine
  5. 神合於動 (shén hé yū dòng) Spirit and Movement Combine
  6. 動合於空 (dòng hé yū kōng) Movement and Emptiness Combine

Eight Methods, 八法[edit]

  1. 氣 (qì) Chi
  2. 骨 (gǔ) Bone
  3. 形 (xíng) Shape
  4. 隨 (suí) Follow
  5. 提 (tí) Rise
  6. 還 (huán) Return
  7. 勒 (lè) Retain
  8. 伏 (fú) Conceal

Forms[edit]

Wu Yi Hui performing Liuhebafa

The system of Liuhebafa, called Huayue Xiyi Men, as taught by Wu Yi Hui contains several forms (套路 taòlù), including bare hand and weapons forms as well as Qigong methods.

Hand forms[edit]

Weapon forms[edit]

Internal exercises[edit]

source: information and translations provided by "International Liuhebafa Internal Arts Association"

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ according to Wu Ying Hua, son of Wu Yi Hui

External links[edit]