List of web browsers

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The following is a list of web browsers that are notable.

Timeline representing the history of various web browsers.

Historical[edit]

A rough estimate of usage share by percent of layout engines of web browsers as of Q2 2009, see usage share of web browsers.

This is a table of personal computer web browsers by year of release of major version, in chronological order, with the approximate number of worldwide Internet users in millions. Note that Internet user data is related to the entire market, not the versions released in that year. The increased growth of the Internet in the 1990s and 2000s means that current browsers with small market shares have more total users than the entire market early on. For example, 90% market share in 1997 would be roughly 60 million users, but by the start of 2007 9% market share would equate to over 90 million users.[1]

YearWeb browsersInternet users
(in millions)[1][2][3]
1991WorldWideWeb (Nexus)4
1992ViolaWWW, Erwise, MidasWWW, MacWWW (Samba)7
1993Mosaic, Cello,[4] Lynx 2.0, Arena, AMosaic 1.010
1994IBM WebExplorer, Netscape Navigator, SlipKnot 1.0, MacWeb, IBrowse, Agora (Argo), Minuet20
1995Internet Explorer 1, Netscape Navigator 2.0, OmniWeb, UdiWWW,[5] Internet Explorer 2, Grail16-39
1996Arachne 1.0, Internet Explorer 3.0, Netscape Navigator 3.0, Opera 2.0,
PowerBrowser 1.5,[6] Cyberdog, Amaya 0.9,[7] AWeb, Voyager
36-73
1997Internet Explorer 4.0, Netscape Navigator 4.0, Netscape Communicator 4.0, Opera 3.0,[8] Amaya 1.0[7]70-118
1998iCab, Mozilla147-184
1999Amaya 2.0,[7] Mozilla M3, Internet Explorer 5.0248-278
2000Konqueror, Netscape 6, Opera 4,[9] Opera 5,[10] K-Meleon 0.2, Amaya 3.0,[7] Amaya 4.0[7]361-396
2001Internet Explorer 6, Galeon 1.0, Opera 6,[11] Amaya 5.0[7]513-499
2002Netscape 7, Mozilla 1.0, Phoenix 0.1, Links 2.0, Amaya 6.0,[7] Amaya 7.0[7]587-659
2003Opera 7,[12] Safari 1.0, Epiphany 1.0, Amaya 8.0[7]719-771
2004Firefox 1.0, Netscape Browser, OmniWeb 5.0817-897
2005Safari 2.0, Netscape Browser 8.0, Opera 8,[13] Epiphany 1.8, Amaya 9.0,[7] AOL Explorer 1.0, Maxthon 1.0, Shiira 1.01018-1022
2006SeaMonkey 1.0, K-Meleon 1.0, Galeon 2.0, Camino 1.0, Firefox 2.0, Avant 11, iCab 3, Opera 9,[14] Internet Explorer 71093-1150
2007Maxthon 2.0, Netscape Navigator 9, NetSurf 1.0, Flock 1.0, Safari 3.0, Conkeror1319-1364
2008Konqueror 4, Safari 3.1, Opera 9.5,[15] Firefox 3, Amaya 10.0,[7] Flock 2, Chrome 1, Amaya 11.0[7]1574-1556
2009Internet Explorer 8, Chrome 2-3, Safari 4, Opera 10,[16] SeaMonkey 2, Camino 2, Firefox 3.51802-1743
2010K-Meleon 1.5.4, Firefox 3.6, Chrome 4-8, Opera 10.50,[17] Safari 5, xxxterm, Opera 111971-2012
2011Chrome 9-16, Firefox 4-9, Internet Explorer 9, Maxthon 3.0, SeaMonkey 2.1-2.3, Opera 11.50, Safari 5.12,267-2264
2012Chrome 17-23, Firefox 10-17, Internet Explorer 10, Opera 12, Safari 62,497

Notable[edit]

In order of release:

Notable layout engines[edit]

Graphical[edit]

Current/maintained projects are in boldface.

Trident shells[edit]

Other software publishers have built browsers and other products around Microsoft's Trident engine. The following browsers are all based on that rendering engine:

Gecko-based[edit]

  • AT&T Pogo (discontinued; based on Firefox)
  • Flock (discontinued; was based on Firefox until version 2.6.1, and based on Chromium thereafter)
  • Swiftfox (discontinued; processor-optimised builds based on Firefox)
  • Swiftweasel (discontinued; processor-optimised builds based on Iceweasel)
  • xB Browser (discontinued; formerly XeroBank Browser and Torpark), portable browser for anonymous browsing, originally based on Firefox
  • K-Ninja for Windows (discontinued; based on K-Meleon)
  • K-MeleonCCF ME for Windows (based on K-Meleon core, mostly written in Lua)

Gecko- and Trident-based[edit]

Browsers that use both Trident and Gecko include:

Webkit- and Trident-based[edit]

Gecko-, Trident- and WebKit-based[edit]

Browsers that can use Trident, Gecko and WebKit include:

KHTML-based[edit]

Presto-based[edit]

WebKit-based[edit]

For Java platform[edit]

Specialty browsers[edit]

Browsers created for enhancements of specific browsing activities.

Current[edit]

Discontinued[edit]

Mosaic based[edit]

Mosaic was the first widely used web browser. The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) licensed the technology and many companies built their own web browser on Mosaic. The best known are the first versions of Internet Explorer and Netscape.

Others[edit]

Mobile[edit]

Text-based[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "History and Growth of the Internet". Internet World Stats. June 21, 2011. Retrieved July 23, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Internet users". The World Bank Group. 15 December 2010. Retrieved 2011-04-13. 
  3. ^ http://stats.areppim.com/stats/stats_internetxfcst.htm
  4. ^ Brennan, Elaine (13 Jun 1993). "World Wibe Web Browser: Ms-Windows (Beta) (1/149)". Humanist Archives Vol. 7. Retrieved 27 March 2010. 
  5. ^ Großmann, Prof. Dr. Hans Peter. "Department of Information Resource Management". University of Ulm. Retrieved 22 March 2010. 
  6. ^ "Oracle Introduces PowerBrowser". Oracle Corporation. 18 June 1996. Retrieved 2007-10-31. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Release history". W3C. Retrieved 2009-05-02. 
  8. ^ "Opera Software Releases 3.60" (Press release). Opera Software. 1998-05-12. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  9. ^ "Opera 4.0 for Windows Released" (Press release). Opera Software. 2000-06-27. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  10. ^ "The Browser War Lights Up in Europe" (Press release). Opera Software. 2000-12-06. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  11. ^ "Opera 6.0 for Windows launched after record-breaking beta" (Press release). Opera Software. 2001-11-29. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  12. ^ "Opera 7 Ready to Rock the Web" (Press release). Opera Software. 2003-01-28. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  13. ^ "Speed, Security and Simplicity: Opera 8 Web Browser Released Today" (Press release). Opera Software. 2005-04-19. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  14. ^ "Your Web, Your Choice: Opera 9 Gives You the Control" (Press release). Opera Software. 2006-06-20. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  15. ^ "Opera redefines Web browsing yet again" (Press release). Opera Software. 2008-06-12. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  16. ^ "Turbocharge your Web experience with Opera 10" (Press release). Opera Software. 2009-09-01. Retrieved 2 January 2010. 
  17. ^ "The world's fastest browser for Windows" (Press release). Oslo, Norway: Opera Software. 2010-03-02. Retrieved 28 March 2010. 
  18. ^ "Mozilla 1.0". mozilla.org. 2002. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  19. ^ http://caminobrowser.org Camino reaches its end
  20. ^ "Try Avant Browser 2012 for a Choice of Rendering Engines". PC world. 2012-01-03. Retrieved 2012-01-03. 
  21. ^ "Have it all: Lunascape, the browser with three engines". CNET News. 2008-11-24. Retrieved 2010-05-20. 
  22. ^ "300 million users and move to WebKit". Opera Developer News. 
  23. ^ "A first peek at Opera 15 for Computers". Opera. Retrieved 2013-06-24. 
  24. ^ "Projects/WebKit/Part — KDE TechBase". KDE TechBase. Retrieved 2010-03-30. 
  25. ^ appiphiliac. "UltraLight Web Browser". AppBrain.com. Retrieved 2010-03-30. 

External links[edit]