List of reptiles of Florida

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This is a list of reptiles which are found in the U.S. state of Florida. This list includes both native and introduced species. Introduced species are put on this list only if they have an established population (large breeding population, numerous specimens caught, invasive, etc.). Three out of the four orders of reptiles can be found in Florida, with the Tuatara order being absent. Though many sources has different amounts (due to introduced species), this lists 118 species, which is about right.

Contents

Testudines

This order includes all the freshwater and sea turtles, as well as the land tortoises. Overall, 26 species can be found. Florida has many turtles, but only one species of tortoise.

Emydids

Snapping Turtles

Mud Turtles

Softshells

Leatherback

Sea Turtles

Tortoises

Crocodilians

There are officially 2 large species of Crocodilians and one introduced species found in Florida. They are the largest reptiles and the largest predators of the state. The Spectacled Caiman was introduced in the 1960s by pet traders who sold them privately as pets, but once the caiman matures they become aggressive towards their owners and would release them into the wild. These non-native species are found in four counties: palm beach, seminole, miami-dade, and broward. In these Southern Florida counties they are often found in or near urban areas. They are found in lakes and canals in the miami area and in swamps, but the caimans are also competing with Florida's native species.

Alligators

Crocodiles

Squamates (suborder Lacertilia)

The squamates are by far the largest reptile order. It is therefore divided into suborders. Lizards may be the most numerous reptiles in the state, though many species were introduced.

Anoles

Iguanas

Agamids

Teiids

Geckos

Skinks

Anguids

Squamates (suborder Serpentes)

This suborder includes all kinds of snakes. There are many snakes in Florida, some venomous and others non-venomous, and unlike lizards, nearly all are native. Two species are introduced, including the Burmese Python, which was introduced when Hurricane Andrew destroyed a holding facility full of imported snakes, and which created a huge media storm and fears it would become widely invasive, but this species has proven unable to withstand colder weather outside of extreme South Florida.

Blind Snakes

Pythons

Colubrids

Elapids

Vipers

Squamates (suborder Amphisbaenidae)

This is the smallest and least known squamate suborder. It contains the wormlike amphisbaenids. Florida has one species.

Amphisbaenids

Sources

Reptile Database

Florida Herpetology Center