List of prisoner-of-war camps in Germany

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Part of Lists of Prisoner-of-War Camps section in the Prisoner-of-war camp article.

This article is a list of prisoner-of-war camps in Germany (and in German occupied territory) during any conflict. These are the camps that housed captured members of the enemy armed forces, crews of ships of the merchant marine and the crews of civil aircraft.

For civilian and concentration camps, see List of concentration camps of Nazi Germany.

Contents

World War I POW Camps[edit]

During World War I camps were run by the 25 Army Corps Districts into which Germany was divided.[1][2]

Types of camps[edit]

Kriegsgefangenenlager (KGFL, "Prisoner of war camps") were divided into:

List of camps by Army Corps districts[edit]

Map of POW camps in Germany during WWI
Kriegsgefangenenlager Crossen, 1914
British, French and Portuguese troops, c.1918
French colonial troops from North and West Africa
French POWs at work at a farm in Westscheid bei Mennighüffen

Guards Corps (Berlin)[edit]

Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

I Army Corps (Königsberg)[edit]

None found.

II Army Corps (Stettin)[edit]

Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

III Army Corps (Berlin)[edit]

Mannschaftslager
Internierungslager

IV Army Corps (Magdeburg)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Internierungslager

V Army Corps (Posen)[edit]

Mannschaftslager

VI Army Corps (Breslau)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

VII Army Corps (Münster)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

VIII Army Corps (Coblenz)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

IX Army Corps (Altona)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

X Army Corps (Hannover)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett
Internierungslager

XI Army Corps (Cassel)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager

XII Army Corps (Dresden)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager

XIII Army Corps (Stuttgart)[edit]

Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

XIV Army Corps (Karlsruhe)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Internierungslager

XV Army Corps (Strasbourg)[edit]

Offizierlager

XVI Army Corps (Metz)[edit]

Lazarett

XVII Army Corps (Danzig)[edit]

Mannschaftslager

XVIII Army Corps (Frankfurt-am-Main)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

XIX Army Corps (Leipzig)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager

XX Army Corps (Allenstein)[edit]

Mannschaftslager

XXI Army Corps (Saarbrücken)[edit]

Offizierlager

I Royal Bavarian Army Corps (Munich)[edit]

Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

II Royal Bavarian Army Corps (Würzburg)[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager

III Royal Bavarian Army Corps (Nürnberg)[edit]

Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

Others[edit]

Offizierlager
Mannschaftslager
Lazarett

World War II POW Camps[edit]

POW camps run by the Germans during World War II. There were around 1,000 Prisoner-of-War camps in Germany during World War II.[6]

Germany was a signatory at the Third Geneva Convention, which established the provisions relative to the treatment of Prisoners of War.

Types of Camps[edit]

Nomenclature[edit]

At the start of World War II, the German Army was divided into 17 military districts (Wehrkreis), which were each assigned Roman numerals. The camps were numbered according to the military district. A letter behind the Roman number marked individual Stalags in a military district.

e.g.

Stalag II-D was the fourth Stalag in Military District II (Wehrkreis II).

Sub-camps had a suffix "/Z" (for Zweiglager - sub-camp). The main camp had a suffix of "/H" (for Hauptlager - main camp).

e.g.

Oflag VII-C/H meant this is the main camp.
Oflag VII-C/Z meant this is a sub-camp of a main camp.

Some of these sub-camps were not the traditional POW camps with barbed wire fences and guard towers, but merely accommodation centers.

List of Camps by Military District[edit]

Diorama of the German World War II PoW camp Stalag Luft III.
Collection of everyday items of Polish prisoners from the Oflag VII-A Murnau.

Military District I (Königsberg)[edit]

Military District II (Stettin)[edit]

Military District III (Berlin)[edit]

Military District IV (Dresden)[edit]

Military District V (Stuttgart)[edit]

Military District VI (Münster)[edit]

Military District VII (Munich)[edit]

Military District VIII (Breslau)[edit]

Military District IX (Kassel)[edit]

Military District X (Hamburg)[edit]

Military District XI (Hanover)[edit]

Military District XII (Wiesbaden)[edit]

Military District XIII (Nuremberg)[edit]

Military District XVII (Vienna)[edit]

Military District XVIII (Salzburg)[edit]

Military District XX (Danzig)[edit]

Military District XXI (Posen)[edit]

Other Camps[edit]

Luftwaffe Camps[edit]

The camps for Allied airmen were run by the Luftwaffe independently of the Army.

Kriegsmarine Camps[edit]

The camps for Allied seamen was run by the Kriegsmarine independently of the Army.

Fictional prison camps[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Steuer (2008) Ch.13, pp.3-6
  2. ^ Pope-Hennessy, Una (1920). Map of the Main Prison Camps in Germany and Austria, with Gazetter and Index. London: Nisbet & Co. Ltd. Retrieved 4 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Steuer (2008) Ch.11, p.6
  4. ^ "Danzig Prisoner of War Camp in WWI". irishbrigade.eu. 2011. Retrieved 5 May 2012. 
  5. ^ "History of the Fortress". kronach.de. 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012. 
  6. ^ Eric Lichtblau (3 March 2013). "The Holocaust Just Got More Shocking". New York Times. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
Bibliography

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]