List of first-class cricket records

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search

This list of first-class cricket records itemises some record team and individual performances in first-class cricket. The list is necessarily selective, since it is in cricket's nature to generate copious records and statistics. Both instance records (such as highest team and individual scores, lowest team scores and record margins of victory) and season and career records (such as most runs or wickets in a season, and most runs or wickets in a career) are included.

Some matches are not universally accepted as first-class for statistical purposes and there are thus variations in published statistics, mainly because of the different proposals that have been made for the start of first-class statistical records, ranging from the 17th century to 1864. For a more detailed explanation, see Variations in first-class cricket statistics.

Records shown here are quoted by either CricketArchive or Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, unless otherwise stated.

Notation[edit]

Team notation
Batting Notation
Bowling Notation

Team records[edit]

Team scoring records[edit]

Greatest margins of victory by an innings[edit]

Qualification: Innings and 550 runs.

MarginTeamsVenueSeason
Innings and 851 runsPakistan Railways beat Dera Ismail Khan[1]Lahore1964–65
Innings and 666 runsVictoria beat Tasmania[2]Melbourne1922–23
Innings and 656 runsVictoria beat New South Wales[3]Melbourne1926–27
Innings and 605 runsNew South Wales beat South Australia[4]Sydney1900–01
Innings and 579 runsEngland beat Australia[5]The Oval1938
Innings and 575 runsSind beat Baluchistan[6]Karachi1973–74
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 19 May 2006.

Greatest margins of victory by runs[edit]

Qualification: 575 runs.

MarginTeamsVenueSeason
685 runsNew South Wales beat Queensland[7]Sydney1929–30
675 runsEngland beat Australia[8]Brisbane1928–29
638 runsNew South Wales beat South Australia[9]Adelaide1920–21
609 runsMuslim Commercial Bank beat Water and Power Development Authority[10]Lahore1977–78
585 runsSargodha beat Lahore Municipal Corporation[11]Faisalabad1978–79
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 19 May 2006.

Victory without losing a wicket[edit]

TeamsVenueSeason
Lancashire beat Leicestershire[12]Manchester1956
Karachi A beat Sind A[13]Karachi1957–58
Railways beat Jammu and Kashmir[14]Srinagar1960–61
Karnataka beat Kerala[15]Chikmagalur1977–78
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 19 May 2006.

Ties[edit]

There have been 33 ties in first class cricket since 1948. Before then, a tie was sometimes declared where the scores were level when scheduled play ended, but the side batting last still had wickets in hand. Matches where this happens are considered a draw today, and a tie is now recognised only where the scores are level and the side batting fourth is dismissed.

Highest totals[edit]

Qualification: 900.

RunsTeamsVenueSeason
1,107Victoria (v New South Wales)[3]Melbourne1926–27
1,059Victoria (v Tasmania)[2]Melbourne1922–23
952-6dSri Lanka (v India)[16]Colombo1997
951-7dSind (v Baluchistan)[6]Karachi1973–74
944-6dHyderabad (v Andhra)[17]Secunderabad1993–94
918New South Wales (v South Australia)[4]Sydney1900–01
912-8dHolkar (v Mysore)[18]Indore1945–46
912-6dTamil Nadu (v Goa)[19]Panaji1988–89
910-6dRailways (v Dera Ismail Khan)[1]Lahore1964–65
903-7dEngland (v Australia)[5]The Oval1938
900-6dQueensland (v Victoria)[20]Brisbane2005–06
Tamil Nadu's total of 912-6d included 52 penalty runs.
The highest aggregate in a first-class match (both sides) was 2376, Maharashtra v Bombay at Poona, 1948–49.[21][22]
Totals of 800 and above have been compiled on 34 occasions, most recently by Victoria (scoring 806-8d) against Queensland at Melbourne in 2008–09.
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 1 December 2011.

Lowest totals[edit]

Qualification: 15.

RunsTeamsVenueSeason
6The Bs (v All-England)[23]Lord's1810
12Oxford University (v MCC and Ground)[24]Oxford1877
12Northamptonshire (v Gloucestershire)[25]Gloucester1907
13Auckland (v Canterbury)[26]Auckland1877–78
13Nottinghamshire (v Yorkshire)[27]Nottingham1901
14Surrey (v Essex)[28]Chelmsford1983
15MCC (v Surrey)[29]Lord's1839
15Victoria (v MCC)[30]Melbourne1903–04
15Northamptonshire (v Yorkshire)[31]Northampton1908
15Hampshire (v Warwickshire)[32]Birmingham1922
The lowest combined total for a side's two innings is 34 (16 and 18) by Border against Natal at East London in 1959–60.[33]
The lowest aggregate for a completed first-class match (both sides) is 85, Quetta v Rawalpindi at Islamabad, 2008–09.[21][34]

The lowest aggregate for a completed first-class match where the winning side bowled their opponents out twice is 105, MCC v Australians at Lord's, 1878.[21][35]

Sides have been bowled out for 20 or fewer on 35 occasions (including five before 1864 that are not universally considered first-class), the most recent being 20 by Essex against Lancashire at Chelmsford in 2013.
Source: CricketArchive. Last updated 16 June 2013.

Highest totals in the fourth innings[edit]

Qualification: 510.

RunsTeamsResultVenueSeason
654–5England (v South Africa)[36]DrawnDurban1938–39
604Maharashtra (v Bombay)[22]Bombay won by 354 runsPune1948–49
576–8Trinidad (v Barbados)[37]DrawnPort-of-Spain1945–46
572New South Wales (v South Australia)[38]South Australia won by 20 runsSydney1907–08
541–7West Zone (v South Zone)[39]West Zone won by three wicketsHyderabad2009–10
529–9Western Australia Combined XI (v South Africans)[40]DrawnPerth1963–64
518Victoria (v Queensland)[41]Queensland won by 234 runsBrisbane1926–27
513–9Central Province (v Southern Province)[42]Central Province won by one wicketKandy2003–04
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 7 February 2010.

Individual records[edit]

Individual records (batting)[edit]

Highest individual score[edit]

The highest individual score in first-class cricket is 501* scored by Brian Lara for Warwickshire in 1994. There have been nine other scores of 400 or more, including another by Lara and two by Bill Ponsford.

Scorecards began to be kept regularly from the 1772 season but there is no certainty of a complete statistical record for any season until well into the 19th century, which is why Roy Webber and others have been reluctant to begin their first-class statistics before the 1864 season.[43]

The earliest century definitely recorded in a first-class match is the 136 scored by John Small in the 1775 season (see below). There can be little doubt that centuries had been scored before this but the records are either lost or the known details are incomplete. Some of the main instances of high scoring prior to 1772 are as follows:

The following individual scores in first-class matches from 1772 are progressively the highest definitely recorded on contemporary scorecards:

Ward's record survived for 56 years until W. G. Grace scored the first triple-century in first-class cricket in 1876. The table below shows the progressive world record in first-class cricket from 1876.

Bill Ponsford, who twice broke the record for highest individual score
RunsPlayerMatchVenueSeason
344W. G. Grace (Gentlemen of MCC)Kent v Gentlemen of MCC[54]Canterbury1876
424Archie MacLaren (Lancashire)Somerset v Lancashire[55]Taunton1895
429Bill Ponsford (Victoria)Victoria v Tasmania[2]Melbourne1922–23
437Bill Ponsford (Victoria)Victoria v Queensland[56]Melbourne1927–28
452*Don Bradman (New South Wales)New South Wales v Queensland[7]Sydney1929–30
499Hanif Mohammad (Karachi)Karachi v Bahawalpur[57]Karachi1958–59
501*Brian Lara (Warwickshire)Warwickshire v Durham[58]Birmingham1994
Source: CricketArchive. Last updated: 9 July 2009.

Other record innings (not first-class):

Most runs in a career[edit]

Qualification: 40,000.

RunsPlayerInningsMatchesAverageCareer span
61,760Jack Hobbs (Surrey and England)1,32583450.70from 1905 to 1934
58,959Frank Woolley (Kent and England)1,53097840.77from 1906 to 1938
57,611Patsy Hendren (Middlesex and England)1,30083350.80from 1907 to 1938
55,061Phil Mead (Hampshire and England)1,34081447.67from 1905 to 1936
54,211W. G. Grace (Gloucestershire, London County, and England)1,47887039.45from 1865 to 1908
50,670Herbert Sutcliffe (Yorkshire and England)1,09875452.02from 1919 to 1945
50,551Wally Hammond (Gloucestershire and England)1,00563456.10from 1920 to 1951
48,426Geoffrey Boycott (Yorkshire and England)1,01460956.83from 1962 to 1986
47,793Tom Graveney (Gloucestershire, Worcestershire and England)1,22373244.91from 1948 to 1971–72
44,846Graham Gooch (Essex and England)99058149.01from 1973 to 1997 (plus one match in 2000)
43,551Tom Hayward (Surrey and England)1,13871241.79from 1893 to 1914
43,423Dennis Amiss (Warwickshire and England)1,13965842.86from 1960 to 1987
42,719Colin Cowdrey (Kent and England)1,13069242.89from 1950 to 1976
41,284Andy Sandham (Surrey and England)1,00064344.82from 1911 to 1937–38
41,112Graeme Hick (Worcestershire, England, Zimbabwe, Queensland and Northern Districts)87152652.23from 1983–84 to 2008
40,140Len Hutton (Yorkshire and England)81451355.51from 1934 to 1960
Source: Wisden 2006 and CricketArchive – 20,000 or more runs in a first-class career. Last updated: 17 October 2009.

Highest career average[edit]

Don Bradman: his first class average of 95.14 is, like his Test average of 99.94, much higher than any other batsman's

Qualification: 20,000 runs, average 54. Entries in bold are for current players who are still playing first-class cricket.

AveragePlayerMatchesRunsCareer span
95.14Don Bradman (New South Wales, South Australia and Australia)23428,067from 1927–28 to 1948 (plus occasional matches in 1948–49)
57.84Sachin Tendulkar (Bombay/Mumbai and India)31025,396from 1988–89 to 2013–14
57.83Darren Lehmann (South Australia, Victoria, Australia and Yorkshire)28425,795from 1987–88 to 2007–08
56.83Geoff Boycott (Yorkshire and England)60948,426from 1962 to 1986
56.37K S Ranjitsinhji (Sussex and England)30724,692from 1893 to 1912 (plus three matches in 1920)
56.22Bob Simpson (New South Wales, Western Australia and Australia)25721,029from 1952–53 to 1977–78
56.10Wally Hammond (Gloucestershire and England)63450,551from 1920 to 1947 (plus occasional matches to 1951)
55.90Ricky Ponting (Tasmania and Australia)28924,150from 1992–93 to 2013
55.69Shivnarine Chanderpaul (Guyana and West Indies)33124,451from 1991–92 to 2014
55.51Len Hutton (Yorkshire and England)51340,140from 1934 to 1955 (plus occasional matches to 1960)
55.33Rahul Dravid (Karnataka and India)29823,794from 1990–91 to 2011–12
54.87Gary Sobers (Barbados, West Indies, South Australia and Nottinghamshire)38328,314from 1952–53 to 1974
54.74Barry Richards (Natal, South Africa, Hampshire and South Australia)33928,358from 1964–65 to 1982–83
54.67Graeme Pollock (Eastern Province, Transvaal and South Africa)26220,940from 1960–61 to 1986–87
  • In addition to Bradman, the following batsmen batted in 50 innings or more with an average of 64.00 or above:
  • 71.64 – Vijay Merchant, 150 matches, 13,470 runs, from 1929–30 to 1950–51
  • 69.86 – George Headley, 103 matches, 9,921 runs, from 1927–28 to 1948–49 plus occasional matches to 1954
  • 67.46 – Ajay Sharma, 129 matches, 10,120 runs, from 1984–85 to 1999–2000
  • 65.18 – Bill Ponsford, 162 matches, 13,819 runs, from 1920–21 to 1934–35
  • 64.99 – Bill Woodfull, 174 matches, 13,388 runs, from 1921–22 to 1934–35
Source: Wisden 2006, CricketArchive – 20,000 or more runs in a first-class career and Cricinfo – Highest career batting average. Last updated: 17 September 2014.

The highest first-class batting career average of all is 207.00, by Norman Callaway, who aged 18 scored 207 in his only first-class innings on his début for New South Wales against Queensland in 1914–15. He died during the Second Battle of Bullecourt in 1917.[60]

Most runs in a season[edit]

RunsPlayerSeason
3,816 runs (50 innings, average 90.85)Denis Compton (Middlesex & England)1947
3,539 runs (52 innings, average 80.43)Bill Edrich (Middlesex & England)1947
3,518 runs (61 innings, average 66.37)Tom Hayward (Surrey and England)1906
3,429 runs (56 innings, average 68.58)Len Hutton (Yorkshire and England)1949
3,352 runs (59 innings, average 60.94)Frank Woolley (Kent and England)1928
These records are unlikely ever to be beaten, because fewer first-class matches are played nowadays
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 19 May 2006.

Most runs in an over[edit]

RunsSequenceBatsmanBowlerMatchVenueSeason
366 6 6 6 6 6Garfield Sobers (Nottinghamshire)Malcolm Nash (Glamorgan)Glamorgan v Nottinghamshire[61]Swansea1968
366 6 6 6 6 6Ravi Shastri (Bombay)Tilak Raj (Baroda)Bombay v Baroda[62]Bombay1984–85
344 6 6 0 4 4 4 6
(2 no-balls)
Ted Alletson (Nottinghamshire)Ernest Killick (Sussex)Sussex v Nottinghamshire[63]Hove1911
344 0 4 4 6 6 6 4
(8-ball over)
Richard Edwards (New Zealand Governor-General's XI)Joey Carew (West Indians)Governor-General's XI v West Indians[64]Auckland1968–69
346 4 6 6 6 6Frank Hayes (Lancashire)Malcolm Nash (Glamorgan)Glamorgan v Lancashire[65]Swansea1977
346 4 4 4 4 6 6 0
(2 no-balls contributed 2 extras each, so the over cost 38)
Andrew Flintoff (Lancashire)Alex Tudor (Surrey)Lancashire v Surrey[66]Manchester1998
346 6 6 6 4 6Craig Spearman (Gloucestershire)Stephen Moreton (Oxford University Centre of Cricketing Excellence)Oxford UCCE v Gloucestershire[67]Oxford2005
The following instances are not usually included as records because the bowlers deliberately conceded runs in an attempt to manufacture an otherwise unlikely victory
750 4 4 4 6 6 4 6 1 4 1 0 6 6 6 6 6 0 0 4 0 1
(including 17 no-balls and only five legitimate deliveries; 2 no-balls not scored off contributed one each, so the over cost 77)
Lee Germon and R. M. Ford (Canterbury)R. H. Vance (Wellington)Canterbury v Wellington[68]Christchurch1989–90
346 6 6 6 4 6Matthew Maynard (Glamorgan)Steve Marsh (Kent)Glamorgan v Kent[69]Swansea1992
346 6 4 6 6 6Glen Chapple (Lancashire)Tony Cottey (Glamorgan)Lancashire v Glamorgan[70]Manchester1993
346 4 6 6 6 6Barry Touzel (Western Province B)Frans Viljoen (Griqualand West)Western Province B v Griqualand West[71]Kimberley1993–94
Source: Wisden 2006, and Cricinfo. Last updated: 10 June 2006.

High proportion of team's runs[edit]

It is not unusual for a batsman to dominate the scoring while he is at the wicket; it is more unusual for a batsman to dominate his side's completed total if they are all out.

The lowest completed first-class innings to include a fifty is Indians' 66 against Yorkshire at Harrogate in 1932, to which Nazir Ali contributed 52 (78.79%) and his partners 9 (there were 5 extras).[72]

The lowest completed first-class innings to include a century is Nottinghamshire's 143 against Hampshire at Bournemouth in 1981, to which Clive Rice contributed 105* (73.4%) and his partners 35 (there were 3 extras)[73] and Gujranwala's 143 against Bahawalpur at Bahawalpur in 2001–02, to which Rizwan Malik contributed 100* (69.93%) and his partners 41 (there were 2 extras).[74]

The lowest completed first-class innings to include a double-century is Namibia's 282 against Kenya at Sharjah in January 2008, to which Gerrie Snyman contributed 230 (81.56%) and his partners 43 (there were 9 extras).[75]

The lowest completed first-class innings to include a triple century is the Rest's 387 against Hindus at Bombay in 1943–44, to which Vijay Hazare contributed 309 (79.84%) and his partners 59 (there were 19 extras).[76]

The lowest completed first-class total to include a score of 350 is Otago's 500 against Canterbury at Christchurch in 1952–53, to which opener Bert Sutcliffe contributed 385 (77.0%) and his partners 86 (there were 29 extras).[77]

The highest percentage of runs scored in any completed innings is 83.43% by Glenn Turner who scored 141* out of Worcestershire's 169 against Glamorgan at Swansea in 1977. The remaining batsmen scored 27 and there was one extra.[78]

In the 2007 English cricket season, Mark Ramprakash scored a record 30.02% of Surrey's runs excluding extras. In 16 matches he scored 2,026 runs at an average of 101.30, while his team mates managed 4,721 between them at an average of 26.08.[79]

Most boundaries in an innings[edit]

Qualification: 55 boundaries.

boundariesPlayerMatchSeason
72 (10 sixes and 62 fours)Brian Lara (he scored 501*)Warwickshire v Durham at Birmingham[58]1994
68 (68 fours)Percy Perrin (343*)Essex v Derbyshire at Chesterfield[80]1904
65 (a six and 64 fours)Archie MacLaren (424)Lancashire v Somerset at Taunton[55]1895
64 (64 fours)Hanif Mohammad (499)Karachi v Bahawalpur at Karachi[57]1958–59
57 (5 sixes and 52 fours)John Edrich (310*)
(The most boundaries in a Test match innings)
England v New Zealand at Leeds[81]1965
57 (5 sixes and 52 fours)Naved Latif (394)Sargodha v Gujranwala at Gujranwala[82]2000–01
56 (2 sixes and 54 fours)Kedar Jadhav (327)Maharashtra v Uttar Pradesh at Gahunje[83]2012–13
55 (55 fours)Charles Gregory (383)New South Wales v Queensland at Brisbane[84]1906–07
55 (2 sixes and 53 fours)Geoff Marsh (355*)Western Australia v South Australia at Perth[85]1989–90
55 (3 sixes, 1 five and 51 fours)Sanjay Manjrekar (377)Bombay v Hyderabad at Bombay[86]1990–91
55 (3 sixes and 52 fours)Darren Lehmann (339)Yorkshire v Durham at Headingley[87]2006
55 (1 six and 54 fours)Daryl Mitchell (298)Worcestershire v Somerset at Taunton[88]2009
55 (1 six and 54 fours)Stephen Cook (390)Lions v Warriors at East London[89]2009–10
55 (8 sixes and 47 fours)Rilee Rossouw (319)Eagles v Titans at Centurion[90]2009–10
There have been higher proportions of boundaries in an innings. In 2004 Thilina Kandamby playing for Sri Lankans against Zimbabwe A at Harare scored 52 including 10 fours and 2 sixes.[91] At Leicester in 2006 Mark Pettini of Essex, facing Leicestershire "bowlers" who were giving away runs in order to contrive a positive result, hit 114* including 12 fours and 11 sixes (Essex lost).[92]

The most sixes in an innings is 16, achieved on four occasions, by Andrew Symonds (254*) for Gloucestershire v Glamorgan at Abergavenny in 1995 – he hit a record 20 sixes in the match,[93] Graham Napier (196) for Essex v Surrey at Croydon in 2011,[94] Jesse Ryder (175) for New Zealanders v Australia A at Brisbane in 2011–12[95] and Mukhtar Ali (168) for Rajshahi Division v Chittagong Division at Savar in 2013-14.[96]

Source: Wisden 2011. Last updated: 13 April 2014.

Most triple-centuries[edit]

Qualification: 3. Includes all scores of 300 or more. Entries in bold are for batsmen still playing first-class cricket.

Triple-centuriesPlayerMatchesCareer span
6Donald Bradman (two for Australia, two for New South Wales and two for South Australia)in 234 matchesfrom 1927–28 to 1948–49
4Bill Ponsford (all for Victoria)in 162 matchesfrom 1920–21 to 1934 (plus one match in 1934–35)
4Wally Hammond (one for England and three for Gloucestershire)in 634 matchesfrom 1920 to 1951
3W. G. Grace (two for Gloucestershire and one for MCC)in 870 matchesfrom 1865 to 1908
3Graeme Hick (all for Worcestershire)in 526 matchesfrom 1983–84 to 2008
3Brian Lara (two for West Indies and one for Warwickshire)in 259 matchesfrom 1987–88 to 2006–07
3Mike Hussey (all for Northamptonshire)in 273 matchesfrom 1994–95 to 2012–13
3Ravindra Jadeja (all for Saurashtra)in 55 matchesfrom 2006–07 to 2014
3Cheteshwar Pujara (two for Saurashtra and one for India A)in 100 matchesfrom 2005–06 to 2014
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 17 September 2014.

Most double-centuries[edit]

Qualification: 15. Includes all scores of 200 or more.

Double-centuriesPlayerMatchesCareer span
37Donald Bradman (twelve for Australia in Test matches, seven for touring Australian sides, eight for New South Wales, eight for South Australia, one for WM Woodfull's XI and one for DG Bradman's XI)in 234 matchesfrom 1927–28 to 1948–49
36Wally Hammond (seven for England in Test matches, twenty-four for Gloucestershire, five for touring MCC sides)in 634 matchesfrom 1920 to 1951
22Patsy Hendren (one for England in a Test match, four for touring MCC sides, fifteen for Middlesex and two for MCC)in 833 matchesfrom 1907 to 1938
17Mark Ramprakash (five for Middlesex and twelve for Surrey)in 461 matchesfrom 1987 to 2012
17Herbert Sutcliffe (sixteen for Yorkshire and one for England in a Test trial)in 754 matchesfrom 1919 to 1945
16C. B. Fry (thirteen for Sussex, two for Hampshire and one for Gentlemen)in 394 matchesfrom 1892 to 1921–22
16Jack Hobbs (one for England in a Test match, thirteen for Surrey, one for Players and one for Rest of England)in 834 matchesfrom 1905 to 1934
16Graeme Hick (fourteen for Worcestershire, one for Zimbabweans and one for Northern Districts)in 526 matchesfrom 1983–84 to 2008
Source: Wisden 2006. Last updated: 9 July 2012.

Most centuries[edit]

Qualification: 115.

CenturiesPlayerMatchesCareer span
199Jack Hobbs
including 15 for England in Test matches, 12 for touring representative MCC teams, 144 for Surrey, and 16 for Players v Gentlemen
in 834 matchesfrom 1905 to 1934
170Patsy Hendren
including 7 for England in Test matches, 16 for touring representative MCC teams, 119 for Middlesex, and 13 for MCC
in 833 matchesfrom 1907 to 1938
167Wally Hammond
including 22 for England in Test matches, 20 for touring representative MCC teams, and 113 for Gloucestershire
in 634 matchesfrom 1920 to 1951
153Phil Mead
including 4 for England in Test matches, 3 for touring representative MCC teams, and 138 for Hampshire
in 814 matchesfrom 1905 to 1936
151Herbert Sutcliffe
including 16 for England in Test matches, 7 for touring representative MCC teams, and 112 for Yorkshire
in 754 matchesfrom 1919 to 1945
151Geoffrey Boycott
including 22 for England in Test matches, 13 for touring representative MCC teams, and 103 for Yorkshire
in 609 matchesfrom 1962 to 1986
145Frank Woolley
including 5 for England in Test matches, 7 for touring representative MCC teams, and 122 for Kent
in 978 matchesfrom 1906 to 1938
136Graeme Hick
including 6 for England in Test matches, 7 for touring representative England teams, 106 for Worcestershire, and 10 for Northern Districts
in 526 matchesfrom 1983–84 to 2008
129Len Hutton
including 19 for England in Test matches, 18 for touring representative MCC teams, and 85 for Yorkshire
in 513 matchesfrom 1934 to 1960
128Graham Gooch
including 20 for England in Test matches, 8 for official touring representative England teams, and 94 for Essex
in 581 matchesfrom 1973 to 1997 (plus one match in 2000)
124W. G. Grace (see List of first-class cricket centuries by W. G. Grace)
including 2 for England in Test matches, 19 for MCC teams, 52 for Gloucestershire, 7 for London County, and 15 for Gentlemen v Players
in 870 matchesfrom 1865 to 1908
123Denis Compton
including 17 for England in Test matches, 20 for touring representative MCC teams, and 67 for Middlesex
in 515 matchesfrom 1936 to 1958 (plus occasional matches to 1964)
122Tom Graveney
including 11 for England in Test matches, 16 for touring representative MCC teams, 50 for Gloucestershire, and 27 for Worcestershire
in 732 matchesfrom 1948 to 1971–72
117Donald Bradman
including 29 for Australia in Test matches, 30 for touring representative Australian teams or representative Australian teams against touring representative teams, 21 for New South Wales, and 25 for South Australia
in 234 matchesfrom 1927–28 to 1948 (plus occasional matches in 1948–49)
The following also achieved 100 centuries. Viv Richards (114), Mark Ramprakash (114), Zaheer Abbas (108), Andy Sandham (107), Colin Cowdrey (107), Tom Hayward (104), Glenn Turner (103), John Edrich (103), Ernest Tyldesley (102), Les Ames (102), Dennis Amiss (102).
Source: Wisden 2006 and CricketArchive. Last updated: 9 July 2012.

Ineffective batsmen[edit]

Many cricketers with short first class careers fail to ever score a run, and finish with a batting average of 0.00. Seymour Clark (a wicket-keeper for Somerset in the 1930 season) is believed to hold the record for most innings in a scoreless career[97] with nine innings in his five matches, including seven ducks.[98] The record for most matches in a career without ever scoring is believed to belong to John Howarth[97] (a Nottinghamshire fast-medium bowler in the 1960s), whose thirteen matches included seven innings and four ducks.[99]

The longest sequence of consecutive scoreless innings is 12 by Mark Robinson for Northamptonshire in 1990, whose scores that season were 1*, 0*, 1, 0, 0*, 0*, 0*, 0*, 0*, 0, 0, 0, 0*, 0*, 0 and 1*.[100]

The most consecutive single-figure innings by a batsman is 71, which has occurred twice. The first occurrence was by Jem Shaw who played chiefly for Nottinghamshire and the All England Eleven between his first-class debut on 26 June 1865 against Surrey with a score of 9,[101] which he did not surpass until scoring 15 in the second innings of his last match of 1870 for “Richard Daft’s XI” against the United North of England Eleven.[102] This was equalled by Eric Hollies of Warwickshire and England between 20 July 1948, when he made 12 not out against Glamorgan, and 16 August 1950, when he made 14 against Nottinghamshire.[103] Hollies also holds the record for most consecutive innings without reaching 20, playing a total of 284 innings between 23 August 1939 when he made 22 against Gloucestershire and 19 May 1954, when he almost doubled his previous highest first-class score in making 47 against Sussex.[104] Billy Bestwick[105] of Derbyshire did not reach 20 in his last 258 first-class innings after making 20 against Warwickshire on 9 August 1906.

The lowest career batting average by a player with more than fifty first-class matches is almost certainly 2.63 by Francis McHugh of Yorkshire (three matches) and Gloucestershire (92 matches) between 1949 and 1956.[106] McHugh batted in 111 innings for only 179 runs, with only four double figure scores. No other regular first-class cricketer is known to have had a batting average of under 3.00.

Individual records (bowling)[edit]

Most wickets in a career[edit]

Qualification: 2,400.

WicketsPlayerMatchesAverageCareer span
4,204 wicketsWilfred Rhodes (Yorkshire and England)in 1,110 matches16.72from 1898 to 1930
3,776 wicketsTich Freeman (Kent and England)in 592 matches18.42from 1914 to 1936
3,278 wicketsCharlie Parker (Gloucestershire and England)in 635 matches19.46from 1903 to 1935
3,061 wicketsJack Hearne (Middlesex and England)in 639 matches17.75from 1888 to 1914 (plus one match in 1921 and another in 1923)
2,979 wicketsTom Goddard (Gloucestershire and England)in 593 matches19.84from 1922 to 1952
2,874 wicketsAlec Kennedy (Hampshire and England)in 677 matches21.23from 1907 to 1936
2,857 wicketsDerek Shackleton (Hampshire and England)in 647 matches18.65from 1948 to 1969
2,844 wicketsTony Lock (Surrey, Leicestershire, England and Western Australia)in 654 matches19.23from 1946 to 1970–71
2,830 wicketsFred Titmus (Middlesex and England)in 792 matches22.37from 1949 to 1980 (plus one match in 1982)
2,809 wicketsW. G. Grace (Gloucestershire, London County and England)in 870 matches18.14from 1865 to 1908
2,784 wicketsMaurice Tate (Sussex and England)in 679 matches18.16from 1912 to 1937
2,742 wicketsGeorge Herbert Hirst (Yorkshire and England)in 826 matches18.73from 1891 to 1921–2 (plus one match in 1929)
2,503 wicketsColin "Charlie" Blythe (Kent and England)in 439 matches16.81from 1899 to 1914
2,465 wicketsDerek Underwood (Kent and England)in 676 matches20.28from 1963 to 1987
2,432 wicketsEwart Astill (Leicestershire and England)in 733 matches23.76from 1906 to 1939
Source: Cricket Archive.[107] Last updated: 8 June 2006.

Most wickets in a season[edit]

Qualification: 275 wickets.

WicketsPlayerAverageSeason
304Tich Freeman (England, Kent and Players)18.051928
298Tich Freeman (England, Kent, Players and South of England)15.261933
290Tom Richardson (Surrey, Players and South of England)14.371895
283Charles Turner (Australians)11.681888
276Tich Freeman (England, Kent and Players)15.601931
275Tich Freeman (England, Kent, Players and South of England)16.841930
Remarkably, Freeman took 250 wickets or more in England in 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932 and 1933.
These records are unlikely ever to be beaten, because fewer first-class matches are played nowadays
Source: Cricket Archive.[108] Last updated: 16 August 2005.

Best figures in an innings[edit]

John Wisden, who in one innings clean bowled all ten South of England batsmen in 1850

The most wickets possible in an eleven-a-side match is ten, and this has been achieved on a number of occasions. The first to do so was Edmund Hinkly in 1848 for Kent v England at Lord's.[109] Perhaps the most famous early instance was two years later, when John Wisden, playing for the North of England v South of England at Lord's in 1850, clean bowled all ten South batsmen.[110] In these early matches, the number of runs scored off each bowler was not recorded. The only other all-ten analysis not to contain any direct assistance from a fielder was by Eric Hollies, who got seven Nottinghamshire batsman out clean bowled and three leg before wicket in his ten for 49 for Warwickshire v Nottinghamshire at Edgbaston, Birmingham in 1946.[111]

The cheapest all-ten (and therefore the best innings bowling analysis in first-class cricket) was achieved by Hedley Verity in 1932 at Headingley, when he took ten for 10 for Yorkshire against Nottinghamshire.[112] The most expensive all-ten recorded was ten for 175 by Eddie Hemmings playing for a touring International XI against a West Indies XI at Sabina Park, Kingston, Jamaica in 1982.[113]

W. G. Grace, 54,000 runs and 2,800 wickets, and a cricketing stalwart of the Victorian era

The only bowlers to take all ten wickets in an innings more than once were Tich Freeman (three times in 1929, 1930 and 1931), John Wisden (twice, in 1850 and 1851), Vyell Walker (1859 and 1865), Hedley Verity (twice, 1931 and 1932), and Jim Laker (twice, both against the 1956 Australians). W. G. Grace achieved a ten-for analysis twice, in 1873 and 1886; on the first occasion he also scored a century, but the second occasion was in a twelve-a-side match.

Best figures in a match[edit]

The most wickets ever taken in a first-class match is nineteen, by Jim Laker for England against Australia at Old Trafford, Manchester in 1956, in the fourth Test match of that year's Ashes series. His figures were nine for 37 in Australia's first innings, and ten for 53 in their second.[114]

Laker's feat has never been paralleled in first-class cricket. Eighteen wickets in a match was achieved by William Lillywhite for eleven Players against sixteen Gentlemen at Lord's in 1837, and by Henry Arkwright for MCC against Kent in a 12-a-side match at Canterbury in 1861, but seventeen is the most otherwise recorded in an eleven-a-side match. Apart from Laker's, there has only been one instance of seventeen wickets in a match since World War II, by John Davison for Canada against United States of America in an ICC Intercontinental Cup match in 2004.[115]

Five wickets in an innings[edit]

Individual bowlers take great credit if they can capture five or more wickets in an innings. The earliest known instance of this was by William Bullen, who bowled five batsmen out when playing for All-England v Hampshire at Sevenoaks Vine in 1774. Scorecards were still uncommon at the time and bowling analyses were incomplete; bowlers were only credited with "bowled" victims, catches being awarded to the fielder only.

Wilfred Rhodes, an outstanding all rounder: he took more wickets than anyone else, and also regularly opened the batting for England

Tich Freeman took five wickets in an innings a record 386 times. Wilfred Rhodes achieved it 287 times.

Ten wickets in a match[edit]

It is a notable achievement for a bowler to capture 10 wickets in a match, and the feat is usually highlighted in career statistics. The earliest known instance was by Thomas Brett of Hampshire against Surrey at Laleham Burway in 1775. Brett's victims were "all bowled" as he was not credited with wickets falling to catches. He took seven in the first innings and four in the second (but Surrey still won by 69 runs).

Tich Freeman took ten wickets in a match a record 140 times. Charlie Parker achieved it 91 times.

Hat-tricks[edit]

A hat-trick is when a bowler takes three wickets in three consecutive deliveries. Doug Wright achieved the most hat-tricks in first-class cricket with 7, and Tom Goddard and Charlie Parker each took 6.[116]

In 1907, Albert Trott of Middlesex took four wickets in four balls, and another hat-trick, in the same Somerset innings.[117] In 1963–64, Joginder Rao playing for Services took two hat-tricks in the same Northern Punjab innings during his second first-class match, after having also taken a hat-trick in his début match.[118] Other instances of two hat-tricks in a match have been achieved by Alfred Shaw (in 1884), Jimmy Matthews (1912 in a Test match), Charlie Parker (1924), Roly Jenkins (1949), and Amin Lakhani (1978–79).[119]

Four wickets in four balls is a rarer achievement, first done by Joseph Wells (father of science fiction author H. G. Wells) for Kent against Sussex in 1862.[120] Alan Walker, for Nottinghamshire in 1956, uniquely took the last wicket of Leicestershire's first innings, and a hat-trick with the first three balls of their second innings.[121] Bob Crisp is the only player to take four wickets in four balls on two occasions.[120]

Five wickets in five balls has never been achieved. Five wickets in six balls has been achieved five times,[79] by Bill Copson for Derbyshire against Warwickshire in 1937,[122] by William Henderson for North East Transvaal against Orange Free State at Bloemfontein in 1937–38,[123] by Pat Pocock for Surrey against Sussex at Eastbourne in 1972,[124] by Yasir Arafat for Rawalpindi against Faisalabad at Rawalpindi in 2004–05,[125] and by Neil Wagner for Otago against Wellington in 2010–11. Wagner took five wickets in the over, a world's first.[126] Pocock's spell also included six wickets in nine balls and seven wickets in eleven balls, both records.

Individual records (all-rounders)[edit]

An all-rounder excels at more than one discipline, usually both batting and bowling. Wicket-keeping all-rounders are effective batsmen and effective wicket-keepers.

Career all-rounders[edit]

Qualification: 22,000 runs and 1,100 wickets.

PlayerRunsWicketsMatchesCareer span
Frank Woolley (Kent and England)58,959 (average 40.77)2,066 (average 19.87)
Woolley also took 1,018 catches
978from 1906 to 1938
W. G. Grace (Gloucestershire, London County, and England)54,211 (average 39.45)2,809 (average 18.14)870from 1865 to 1908
Wilfred Rhodes (Yorkshire and England)39,969 (average 30.81)4,204 (average 16.72)1,110from 1898 to 1930
Jack Hearne (John William Hearne) (Middlesex and England)37,252 (average 40.98)1,839 (average 24.42)647from 1909 to 1936
George Herbert Hirst (Yorkshire and England)36,356 (average 34.13)2,742 (average 18.73)826from 1891 to 1921 (plus one match in 1929)
Brian Close (Yorkshire, Somerset and England)34,994 (average 33.26)1,171 (average 26.42)786from 1949 to 1977 (plus occasional matches to 1986)
James Langridge (Sussex and England)31,716 (average 35.20)1,530 (average 22.56)695from 1924 to 1953
Trevor Bailey (Essex and England)28,641 (average 33.42)2,082 (average 23.13)682from 1945 to 1967
John King (Leicestershire)25,122 (average 27.33)1,204 (average 25.17)552from 1895 to 1925
John Gunn (Nottinghamshire and England)24,557 (average 33.18)1,242 (average 24.52)535from 1896 to 1925 (plus occasional matches to 1932)
Johnny Douglas (Essex and England)24,531 (average 27.90)1,893 (average 23.32)651from 1901 to 1930
Ray Illingworth (Yorkshire, Leicestershire and England)24,134 (average 28.06)2,072 (average 20.27)787from 1951 to 1983
Vallance Jupp (Sussex, Northamptonshire and England)23,296 (average 29.41)1,658 (average 23.01)529from 1909 to 1938
Ewart Astill (Leicestershire and England)22,735 (average 22.55)2,432 (average 23.76)733from 1906 to 1939
Albert Relf (Sussex and England)22,238 (average 26.79)1,897 (average 20.94)565from 1900 to 1921
Note: in addition to the above, Fred Titmus, Garfield Sobers, Mike Procter, Maurice Tate and Peter Sainsbury all achieved 20,000 runs and 1,000 wickets
Source: Cricket Archive.[108][127] Last updated: 13 March 2007.

Career wicket-keeping all-rounders[edit]

Qualification: 20,000 runs and 1,000 dismissals.

PlayerRunsDismissalsMatchesCareer span
Jim Parks (Sussex, Somerset and England)36,673 (average 34.76)1,181 (1,088 c, 93 st)739from 1949 to 1976
Les Ames (Kent and England)37,248 (average 43.51)1,121 (703 c, 418 st)593from 1926 to 1951
Source: Cricket Archive[127] and Cricinfo.[128] Last updated: 12 March 2007.

Individual records (wicket-keepers)[edit]

Most dismissals (catches plus stumpings) in a career[edit]

Qualification: 1,100.

DismissalsPlayerMatchesCareer span
1,649 (1,473 caught, 176 stumped)Bob Taylor (Derbyshire and England)in 639 matchesfrom 1960 to 1988
1,527 (1,270 c, 257 st)John Murray (Middlesex and England)in 635 matchesfrom 1952 to 1975
1,497 (1,242 c, 255 st)Bert Strudwick (Surrey and England)in 675 matchesfrom 1902 to 1927
1,344 (1,211 c, 133 st)Alan Knott (Kent and England)in 511 matchesfrom 1964 to 1985
1,320 (1,192 c, 128 st)Jack Russell (Gloucestershire and England)in 465 matchesfrom 1981 to 2004
1,310 (933 c, 377 st)Fred Huish (Kent)in 497 matchesfrom 1895 to 1914
1,294 (1,083 c, 211 st)Brian Taylor (Essex)in 572 matchesfrom 1949 to 1973
1,263 (1,139 c, 124 st)Steve Rhodes (Worcestershire and England)in 440 matchesfrom 1981 to 2004
1,253 (906 c, 347 st)David Hunter (Yorkshire)in 548 matchesfrom 1889 to 1909
1,228 (953 c, 275 st)Harry Butt (Sussex and England)in 550 matchesfrom 1890 to 1912
1,207 (852 c, 355 st)Jack Board (London County, Gloucestershire, England and Hawke's Bay)in 525 matchesfrom 1891 to 1914–15
1,206 (904 c, 302 st)Harry Elliott (Derbyshire and England)in 532 matchesfrom 1920 to 1947
1,181 (1,088 c, 93 st)Jim Parks (Sussex, Somerset and England)in 739 matchesfrom 1949 to 1976
1,126 (948 c, 178 st)Roy Booth (Yorkshire and Worcestershire)in 468 matchesfrom 1951 to 1970
1,121 (703 c, 418 st)Les Ames (Kent and England)in 593 matchesfrom 1926 to 1951
Ames achieved the most dismissals in a season with 128 in 1929. The most dismissals in a match is 14 (7 in each innings, 11 caught and 3 stumped) by Ibrahim Khaleel for Hyderabad (India) against Assam at Guwahati in 2011–12.[129] The only wicket-keepers to dismiss 9 batsmen in an innings are Tahir Rasheed (8 caught and 1 stumped) for Habib Bank against Pakistan Automobiles Corporation at Gujranwala in 1992–93[130] and Wayne James (7 caught and 2 stumped) for Matabeleland against Mashonaland Country Districts at Bulawayo in 1995–96 (he also scored 99 and 99* in the same match).[131]
Source: Wisden 2008. Last updated: 27 November 2011.

Most stumpings in a career[edit]

Qualification: 300.

StumpingsPlayerMatchesCareer span
418Les Ames (Kent and England)in 593 matchesfrom 1926 to 1951
377Fred Huish (Kent)in 497 matchesfrom 1895 to 1914
358Ted Pooley (Middlesex and Surrey)in 370 matchesfrom 1861 to 1883
355Jack Board (London County, Gloucestershire, England and Hawke's Bay)in 525 matchesfrom 1891 to 1914–15
347David Hunter (Yorkshire)in 548 matchesfrom 1889 to 1909
343George Duckworth (Lancashire and England)in 504 matchesfrom 1923 to 1938
341Tich Cornford (Sussex and England)in 496 matchesfrom 1921 to 1947
334Harold Stephenson (Somerset)in 463 matchesfrom 1948 to 1964
322Fred Price (Middlesex and England)in 402 matchesfrom 1926 to 1947
302Harry Elliott (Derbyshire and England)in 532 matchesfrom 1920 to 1947
Ames achieved the most stumpings in a season with 64 in 1932.
Source: Wisden 2008 and http://www.cricketarchive.com. Last updated: 3 May 2008.

Individual records (fielding)[edit]

Most catches in a career[edit]

Qualification: 640 catches.

CatchesPlayerMatchesCareer span
1,018Frank Woolley (Kent and England)in 978 matchesfrom 1906 to 1938
876W. G. Grace (Gloucestershire, London County and England)in 870 matchesfrom 1865 to 1908
831Tony Lock (Surrey, Leicestershire, England and Western Australia)in 654 matchesfrom 1946 to 1970–71
820Wally Hammond (Gloucestershire and England)in 634 matchesfrom 1920 to 1951
813Brian Close (Yorkshire, Somerset and England)in 786 matchesfrom 1949 to 1986
788John Langridge (Sussex)in 574 matchesfrom 1928 to 1955
765Wilfred Rhodes (Yorkshire and England)in 1,110 matchesfrom 1899 to 1929–30
760Arthur Milton (Gloucestershire and England)in 620 matchesfrom 1948 to 1974
759Patsy Hendren (Middlesex and England)in 833 matchesfrom 1907 to 1938
709Graeme Hick (Worcestershire, England, Zimbabwe, Queensland and Northern Districts)in 526 matchesfrom 1983–84 to 2008
697Peter Walker (Glamorgan and England)in 469 matchesfrom 1956 to 1972
694John Tunnicliffe (Yorkshire)in 498 matchesfrom 1891 to 1907
675James Seymour (London County and Kent)in 553 matchesfrom 1900 to 1926
675Phil Mead (Hampshire and England)in 814 matchesfrom 1905 to 1936
644Keith Fletcher (Essex and England)in 730 matchesfrom 1962 to 1988
Hammond also made 3 stumpings, Close made 1.
Hammond achieved the most catches in a season: 79 in 1928 — that season he also took the most catches in a match: 10 for Gloucestershire against Surrey at Cheltenham (he also scored 139 and 143 in the same match).[132] The most catches in an innings is 7, by Micky Stewart for Surrey against Northamptonshire at Northampton in 1957,[133] by Tony Brown for Gloucestershire against Nottinghamshire at Nottingham in 1966,[134] and by Rikki Clarke for Warwickshire against Lancashire at Liverpool in 2011.[135]
Source: Cricinfo[128] and http://www.cricketarchive.com. Last updated: 4 August 2011.

Individual records (other)[edit]

Most matches played[edit]

Qualification: 750.

MatchesPlayerCareer span
1,110 matchesWilfred Rhodes (Yorkshire and England)from 1898 to 1930
978 matchesFrank Woolley (Kent and England)from 1906 to 1938
870 matchesW. G. Grace (Gloucestershire, London County and England)from 1865 to 1908
834 matchesJack Hobbs (Surrey and England)from 1905 to 1934
833 matchesPatsy Hendren (Middlesex and England)from 1907 to 1938
826 matchesGeorge Herbert Hirst (Yorkshire and England)from 1891 to 1929
814 matchesPhil Mead (Hampshire and England)from 1905 to 1936
792 matchesFred Titmus (Middlesex and England)from 1949 to 1980
787 matchesRay Illingworth (Yorkshire, Leicestershire and England)from 1951 to 1983
786 matchesBrian Close (Yorkshire and England)from 1949 to 1986
754 matchesHerbert Sutcliffe (Yorkshire and England)from 1919 to 1945
Source: Cricinfo. Last updated: 22 May 2006.

Partnership records[edit]

Highest partnerships[edit]

Qualification: 480.

RunsPlayersOppositionVenueSeason
624 (3rd wicket)Kumar Sangakkara & Mahela Jayawardene (Sri Lanka)[136]v South AfricaColombo2006
580 (2nd wicket)Rafatullah Mohmand & Aamer Sajjad (Water and Power Development Authority)[137]v Sui Southern Gas CompanySheikhupura Stadium2009–10
577 (4th wicket)Vijay Hazare & Gul Mohammad (Baroda)[138]v HolkarBaroda1946–47
576 (2nd wicket)Sanath Jayasuriya & Roshan Mahanama (Sri Lanka)[16]v IndiaColombo1997–98
574* (4th wicket)Clyde Walcott & Frank Worrell (Barbados)[37]v TrinidadPort-of-Spain1945–46
561 (1st wicket)Waheed Mirza & Mansoor Akhtar (Karachi Whites)[139]v QuettaKarachi1976–77
555 (1st wicket)Percy Holmes & Herbert Sutcliffe (Yorkshire)[140]v EssexLeyton1932
554 (1st wicket)Jack Brown & John Tunnicliffe (Yorkshire)[141]v DerbyshireChesterfield1898
539 (3rd wicket)Sagar Jogiyani & Ravindra Jadeja (Saurashtra)[142]v GujaratSurat2012–13
523 (3rd wicket)Michael Carberry & Neil McKenzie (Hampshire)[143]v YorkshireSouthampton2011
520* (5th wicket)Cheteshwar Pujara & Ravindra Jadeja (Saurashtra)[144]v OrissaRajkot2008–09
502* (4th wicket)Frank Worrell & John Goddard (Barbados)[145]v TrinidadBridgetown, Barbados1943–44
494 (5th wicket)Marshall Ayub & Mehrab Hossain, Jr. (Central Zone)[146]v East ZoneBogra2012–13
490 (1st wicket)Ted Bowley & John Langridge (Sussex)[147]v MiddlesexHove1933
487* (6th wicket)George Headley & Clarence Passailaigue (Jamaica)[148]v Lord Tennyson's XIKingston, Jamaica1931–32
480 (2nd wicket)Dean Elgar & Rilee Rossouw (Eagles)[90]v TitansCenturion2009–10
The highest partnerships for the wickets not listed above are
460 (7th wicket)Bhupinder Singh jnr & Pankaj Dharmani (Punjab)[149]v DelhiDelhi1994–95
433 (8th wicket)Arthur Sims & Victor Trumper (Australians)[150]v CanterburyChristchurch1913–14
283 (9th wicket)Arnold Warren & John Chapman (Derbyshire)[151]v WarwickshireBlackwell1910
307 (10th wicket)Alan Kippax & Hal Hooker (New South Wales)[152]v VictoriaMelbourne1928–29
Source: Wisden 2011. Last updated: 13 January 2013.

Notes[edit]

Linked scorecards are from the Cricket Archive.

  1. ^ a b Railways won the toss and batted first, scoring 910 for six declared, with centuries from Ijaz Hussain (124), Javed Babar (200), Pervez Akhtar (337*) and Mohammad Sharif (106*). They then dismissed Dera Ismail Khan for 32 (Afaq Khan took seven for 14) and 27 (Ahad Khan took nine for 7) to win by an innings and 851 runs. Scorecard
  2. ^ a b c Tasmania won the toss and batted first, scoring 217. Victoria replied with a world record 1,059 including centuries from Bill Ponsford (429) and Hammy Love (156). Tasmania then made 176 in their second innings, losing by an innings and 666 runs. Scorecard
  3. ^ a b New South Wales won the toss and batted first, scoring 221. Victoria replied with a world record 1,107 including centuries from Bill Woodfull (133), Bill Ponsford (352), "Stork" Hendry (100) and Jack Ryder (295); Arthur Mailey finished with bowling figures of four for 362. In their second innings New South Wales made 230 (Albert Hartkopf took six for 98), losing by an innings and 656 runs. Scorecard
  4. ^ a b South Australia won the toss and batted first, scoring 157 (Jack Marsh took five for 34). New South Wales replied with 918 including centuries from Frank Iredale (118), Monty Noble (153), Syd Gregory (168), Reggie Duff (119) and Les Poidevin (140*). South Australia made 156 in their second innings (Jack Marsh took five for 59), losing by an innings and 605 runs. Scorecard
  5. ^ a b In the fifth test of the Ashes series, England won the toss and batted first, running up 903 for seven declared with centuries from Len Hutton (364), Maurice Leyland (187) and Joe Hardstaff Jr. (169*). Australia made 201 (Bill Bowes took five for 49) and, following on, 123. England won by a Test record innings and 579 runs. Donald Bradman and Jack Fingleton were both unable to bat in either Australian innings after being injured fielding in England's marathon innings. Scorecard
  6. ^ a b Baluchistan won the toss and batted first, scoring 93. Sind replied with 951 for seven declared with centuries from Bashir Shana (165), Aftab Baloch (428) and Javed Miandad (100), and dismissed Baluchistan for 283 in their second innings (Mubashir Sajjad took five for 97), winning by an innings and 575 runs. Scorecard
  7. ^ a b New South Wales won the toss and batted first, scoring 235, to which Queensland replied with 227 (Stan McCabe taking five for 36). In their second innings New South Wales amassed 761 for eight declared, with centuries from Donald Bradman (a world record 452*) and Alan Kippax (115) (Alec Hurwood took six for 179). Chasing 770 to win, Queensland were bowled out for 84 (Sam Everett took six for 23) and lost by 685 runs. Scorecard
  8. ^ In the first test of the Ashes series, England won the toss and batted first, scoring 521 including 169 by Patsy Hendren. Australia replied with 122, Harold Larwood taking six for 32. England did not enforce the follow-on, but batted again scoring 342 for eight declared (Clarrie Grimmett took six for 131). Having set Australia a target of 742 to win, England dismissed them for 66 to win by 675 runs. Jack Gregory was unable to bat in either Australian innings due to a knee injury, and Charles Kelleway could not bat in their second innings after falling ill with food poisoning. This was Donald Bradman's first Test for Australia. Scorecard
  9. ^ New South Wales won the toss and batted first, scoring 304, including 130 from Jack Gregory. South Australia replied with 265 (Tommy Andrews took five for 89). In their second innings New South Wales scored 770 with centuries from Warren Bardsley (235), Johnny Taylor (180) and Charles Kelleway (103*). Set 810 to win, South Australia scored 171, losing by 638 runs. Bill Whitty was injured and unable to bat in either innings for South Australia. Scorecard
  10. ^ MCB batted first and scored 575 with centuries from Ijaz Faqih (183) and Nadeem Yousuf (107) (Iftikhar Malik took six for 179). WPDA replied with 98 (Anjum Nasir took six for 22). Not enforcing the follow-on, in their second innings MCB quickly ran up 282 for no wicket declared (Qasim Umar 105*, Azmat Rana 161*) and WPDA, set 760, were bowled out for 150 (Anjum Nasir took five for 61), losing by 609 runs. Scorecard
  11. ^ Sargodha batted first, scoring 336 (Farhat Javed took five for 79), to which LMC replied with 77 (Jalal Akbar took five for 27). Declining to enforce the follow-on, in their second innings Sargodha made 416 including 108 from Hamid Nagra. Set 676 for victory, LMC were dismissed for 90 (Joseph Gill took seven for 19), and lost by 585 runs. Scorecard
  12. ^ Leicestershire won the toss and batted first, scoring 108. Lancashire declared in their reply at 166 for no wicket with Alan Wharton 87* and Jack Dyson 75*. In their second innings Leicestershire made 122, Malcolm Hilton taking five for 23, and the Lancashire openers knocked off the target of 64 (Wharton 33*, Dyson 31*) to win by ten wickets. Scorecard
  13. ^ Karachi A won the toss and batted first, declaring when their openers had scored 277 with Hanif Mohammad 146*, and Alimuddin 131*. Sind A replied with 92 (Mahmood Hussain took five for 23 and Ikram Elahi took five for 45). Following on, Sind scored 108 to lose by an innings and 77 runs. Scorecard
  14. ^ Railways won the toss and asked Jammu and Kashmir to bat first; they scored 92. Railways declared their reply at 236 without loss, with openers Vijay Mehra on 107* and Budhi Kunderan on 116*. In their second innings, Jammu and Kashmir made 159 (Lala Amarnath took six for 32), and Mehra and Kunderan knocked off Railways' target of 16 to win by ten wickets. Scorecard
  15. ^ Kerala won the toss and batted first, scoring 141. Karnataka's openers then ran up 451 before their captain declared, with Sanjay Desai scoring 218* and Roger Binny scoring 211*. In their second innings Kerala were bowled out for 124, and Karnataka won by an innings and 186 runs. Scorecard
  16. ^ a b In the first Test of the series, India won the toss and batted first, scoring 537 for eight declared with centuries from Navjot Singh Sidhu (111), Sachin Tendulkar (143) and Mohammad Azharuddin (126). Sri Lanka replied with 952 for six declared with centuries from Sanath Jayasuriya (340), Roshan Mahanama (225) and Aravinda de Silva (126). Jayasuriya and Mahanama added 576 for the second wicket, and batted right through the match's third and fourth days. There was no time left for India to start their second innings, and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  17. ^ Andhra won the toss and batted first, scoring 263 (Narender Singh took five for 84). In reply Hyderabad scored 944 for six declared with centuries from Maruti Sridhar (366), Vivek Jaisimha (211) and Noel David (207*). In their second innings Andhra were 180 for seven when the match ran out of time, and the game was drawn. Scorecard
  18. ^ In their Ranji Trophy semi-final, Holkar batted first and scored 912 for eight declared, with centuries from Kamal Bhandarkar (142), Chandra Sarwate (101), Madhavsinh Jagdale (164), C. K. Nayudu (101), B. B. Nimbalkar (172) and Pratap Singh (100). Mysore replied with 190 (Sarwate took nine for 61) and, following on 722 behind, conceded the match by declaring at 509 for six. Mysore's second innings included 164 from B. K. Garudachar. Holkar won by an innings and 213 runs. Scorecard
  19. ^ Tamil Nadu won the toss and batted first, scoring 860 for six declared, including centuries from Woorkeri Raman (313), Arjan Kripal Singh (302*) and Laxman Sivaramakrishnan (100*). This is the only first class innings to include two triple centuries. Tamil Nadu's total was boosted to 912 by 52 penalty runs awarded because Goa were thirteen overs short of achieving the required over rate. Goa's reply stood at 230 for six when the game ran out of time and was drawn. Scorecard
  20. ^ In the Pura Cup final, Victoria won the toss and batted first, scoring 344 including 108 from Brad Hodge. Needing only a draw to win the trophy, Queensland ran up 900 for six before declaring, including centuries from Jimmy Maher (223), Martin Love (169), Shane Watson (201 retired hurt) and Clinton Perren (173). In their second innings Victoria were bowled out for 202 (Mitchell Johnson took six for 51) to lose by an innings and 354 runs. Scorecard
  21. ^ a b c Wisden 2010, pp. 152–154
  22. ^ a b In a Ranji Trophy semi-final that was to be played to a finish no matter how long it took, Bombay won the toss and batted first, scoring 651 with centuries from Madhav Mantri (200), Uday Merchant (143) and Dattu Phadkar (131). Maharashtra replied with 407 including centuries by Manohar Datar (143) and Madhusudan Rege (133); Keki Tarapore took six for 119. Not enforcing the follow-on, Bombay declared at 714 for eight in their second innings, including 156 from Merchant and 160 from Phadkar. Set 959 to win, Maharashtra made 604 including 100 from Rege, and 146 from Sharad Deodhar. Bombay won by 354 runs. Scorecard
  23. ^ This match is not universally recognised as first-class because it took place before the 1815 and 1864 cutoffs used by some authorities. The Bs batted first, scoring 137, and England replied with 100. In their second innings The Bs were dismissed for 6, an innings containing only three scoring strokes, but only nine wickets fell as Edward Budd was injured and unable to bat. John Hammond took at least five wickets in the innings (in those days catches were not credited to the bowler as a wicket, and some of England's catches may have been off Hammond's bowling). England lost four wickets in reaching their target of 44 to win by six wickets. Scorecard
  24. ^ Oxford University won the toss and batted first, being dismissed for 12 (Fred Morley took seven for 6, Arnold Rylott took two for 6) in 43.2 four-ball overs. Only nine wickets fell in the innings; Oxford's captain, Alexander Webbe, was absent having missed his train, but he did bat in the second innings. MCC were dismissed for 124 (Henry Tylecote taking eight for 51) and bowled out Oxford University for 35 to win the match by an innings and 77 runs. In Oxford University's second innings, Morley took six for 8 (to finish with match figures of thirteen for 14) and Robert Clayton took four for 26. Scorecard
  25. ^ Gloucestershire won the toss and batted first. They were dismissed for 60 (George Thompson took five for 29 and William East took five for 26). In reply, Northamptonshire made 12 (Edward Dennett took eight for 9 and Gilbert Jessop took two for 3). Gloucestershire made 88 in their second innings (East took seven for 36). Set 137 to win, Northamptonshire were 40 for seven in their second innings (Dennett had taken all seven wickets for 12 runs), but rain prevented any play on the last day and the game was drawn. Scorecard
  26. ^ Canterbury won the toss and batted first, scoring 93 (Dan Lynch took seven for 31). In reply Auckland made 135, and then Canterbury scored 163. Set 122 to win, Auckland were dismissed for 13 (David Ashby took five for 2, William Frith took three for 3 and there were two run outs); Auckland's total included eight byes and only five runs off the bat. Canterbury won by 108 runs. Scorecard
  27. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 204 (John Gunn took five for 49). In reply, Nottinghamshire were bowled out for 13, Wilfred Rhodes taking six for 4 and Schofield Haigh taking four for 8. Following on, Nottinghamshire were bowled out for 173 (George Hirst taking six for 26) and lost by an innings and 18 runs. Scorecard
  28. ^ Surrey won the toss and asked Essex to bat first. Essex scored 287, including 110 from Keith Fletcher. In reply, Surrey were bowled out for 14 (having been 8 for eight), the bowlers Norbert Phillip taking six for 4, and Neil Foster taking four for 10. Following on, Surrey were 185 for two (with Roger Knight on 101*) in their second innings when the game ran out of time and was drawn. Scorecard
  29. ^ MCC batted first, and scored 68 (John Bayley taking five wickets). Surrey replied with 170 and dismissed MCC for 15 (Bayley taking four wickets, and William Martingell five) to win by an innings and 87 runs. Scorecard
  30. ^ Victoria won the toss and batted first, scoring 299, including 139 from Percy McAlister, Wilfred Rhodes taking six for 62. In reply, MCC made 248 and then bowled out Victoria for 15 (Rhodes took five for 6, and Ted Arnold took four for 8). Jack Saunders was absent ill, and could not bat in Victoria's second innings. MCC lost two wickets reaching their target of 67, to win by eight wickets. MCC were the touring England side, who went on to win the season's Ashes Test series. Scorecard
  31. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 356 for eight declared including 110 from David Denton (Roger Hawtin took five for 78). In reply Northamptonshire were dismissed for 27 (George Hirst took six for 12) and, following on, 15 (Hirst took six for 7, and Schofield Haigh took three for 8). George Thompson was absent injured, and could not bat in either Northamptonshire innings. Yorkshire won by an innings and 314 runs. Scorecard
  32. ^ Hampshire won the toss and asked Warwickshire to bat first. Warwickshire scored 223, and then bowled Hampshire out for 15 (Harry Howell took six for 7, and Freddie Calthorpe took four for 4). Following on 208 behind, Hampshire were 177 for six before the last four wickets added 344, with George Brown scoring 172 and wicket-keeper Walter Livsey 110* in a total of 521. Warwickshire, requiring 314 to win, were dismissed for 158, Jack Newman taking five for 53; Hampshire won by 155 runs. Scorecard
  33. ^ Border won the toss and fielded first. Natal made 90 (Sidney Knott took five for 40 and Athol Hagemann took five for 49) to which Border replied with 16 (Trevor Goddard took six for 3 and John Cole took four for 13). In their second innings Natal scored 294 for eight declared including 162* from Kim Elgie (Edwin Schreiber took six for 126). Set 369 to win, Border made 18 (Geoff Griffin took seven for 11 and Cole three for 4). Natal won by 350 runs. Scorecard
  34. ^ There was no play on the first two days of this four-day match, and both sides agreed to forfeit their first innings and play a single-innings match. Rawalpindi won the toss and elected to field first. They bowled out Quetta for 41 in 13.3 overs, with Mohammad Rameez taking six for 17. Rawalpindi knocked off the runs they need in only 6.4 overs, scoring 44 for one. The entire match lasted only 121 balls. Scorecard
  35. ^ MCC won the toss and elected to bat first. They were bowled out for 33, Fred Spofforth taking six for 4. The Australians replied with 41, Alfred Shaw taking five for 10 and Fred Morley five for 31. In their second innings MCC mustered only 19, Harry Boyle taking six for 3. The Australians scored 12 for one to win by nine wickets. The match was scheduled for three days, but was completed on the first. Scorecard
  36. ^ In the fifth Test of the series, South Africa won the toss and batted first, scoring 530 with centuries from Pieter van der Bijl (125) and Dudley Nourse (103); Reg Perks took five for 100. England replied with 316. Not enforcing the follow-on, South Africa scored 481 in their second innings, Alan Melville scoring 103. Set 696 to win, England's score was 654 for five at the end of the ninth day of the match, Paul Gibb having scored 120, Bill Edrich 219 and Wally Hammond 140. No play was possible on the eighth day of the match because of rain. Even though England only needed another 42 runs, they had to leave to catch their boat home, and so the game was drawn. Scorecard
  37. ^ a b Barbados batted first, scoring 246 (Cecil Pouchet took six for 52), to which Trinidad replied with 194. In their second innings, Barbados scored 619 for three declared in only 96 eight-ball overs, including 314* from Clyde Walcott and 255* from Frank Worrell. Walcott and Worrell added 574 unbroken for the fourth wicket. Set 672 to win, Trinidad reached 576 for eight when the game ran out of time, Kenneth Trestrail having scored 151, and Gerry Gomez on 213*. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  38. ^ South Australia won the toss and batted first, scoring 349, to which New South Wales replied with 276 (Les Hill took five for 82). In their second innings South Australia scored 519, including 113 from Charles Dolling. Set 593 to win, New South Wales scored 572 including 135 from Victor Trumper and 125 from Sammy Carter to lose by just 20 runs. Scorecard
  39. ^ In the Duleep Trophy final, South Zone won the toss and chose to bat first. South Zone scored 400 (Dinesh Karthik scored 183 and Irfan Pathan took five for 100), to which the West Zone replied with 251 (Yusuf Pathan scored 108 and Chandrasekharan Ganapathy took five for 75). In their second innings, the South Zone declared at 386 for nine, with a second century from Dinesh Karthik (150); Dhawal Kulkarni took five for 58. Set 536 to win, West Zone reached 541 for seven with a century from Chirag Pathak (130) and a second hundred from Yusuf Pathan (210*). The match was won by West Zone by three wickets, the highest successful run-chase in first-class cricket. Scorecard
  40. ^ The Combined XI won the toss and chose to field first. The South Africans scored 207 (Hugh Bevan took five for 68), to which the Combined XI replied with 161. In their second innings, the South Africans declared at 532 for three, with centuries from Eddie Barlow (209) and Graeme Pollock (127*). Set 579 to win, the Combined XI reached 529 for nine with centuries from Bob Simpson (246) and Richie Benaud (132). The match was drawn. Scorecard
  41. ^ Queensland won the toss and batted first, scoring 399, including 104 from Ron Oxenham. Victoria replied with 86. Not enforcing the follow-on, Queensland scored 439 in their second innings including 144 from Eric Knowles. Set 753 to win, Victoria made 518, including 116 from Bill Ponsford and 137 from "Stork" Hendry. Queensland won by 234 runs. Scorecard
  42. ^ Southern Province won the toss and batted first, scoring 392 including 110 from Chamara Silva; Ruchira Perera took seven for 90. Central Province replied with 173, Charitha Buddhika taking five for 46. Electing not to enforce the follow-on, in their second innings Southern Province declared at 292 for two, with hundreds from Marvan Atapattu (126) and Sanjaya Rodrigo (106*). Central Province reached their target of 513 for the loss of nine wickets with centuries from Sajith Fernando (111) and Kumar Sangakkara (101). Central Province won by one wicket. Scorecard
  43. ^ Roy Webber, Playfair Book of Cricket Records, 1951, p.9.
  44. ^ F. S. Ashley-Cooper, At the Sign of the Wicket: Cricket 1742–1751, Cricket Magazine, 1900.
  45. ^ H. T. Waghorn, Cricket Scores, Notes, etc. (1730–1773), p. 66.
  46. ^ H. T. Waghorn, Cricket Scores, Notes, etc. (1730–1773), p. 68.
  47. ^ "CricketArchive – match scorecard". Cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  48. ^ F. S. Ashley-Cooper, The Hambledon Cricket Chronicle, Herbert Jenkins, 1924, p. 177.
  49. ^ F S Ashley-Cooper, The Hambledon Cricket Chronicle, Herbert Jenkins, 1924, p. 178.
  50. ^ Arthur Haygarth, Scores & Biographies, Volume 1 (1744–1826), Lillywhite, 1862, p. 19.
  51. ^ Arthur Haygarth, Scores & Biographies, Volume 1 (1744–1826), Lillywhite, 1862, p. 25.
  52. ^ Arthur Haygarth, Scores & Biographies, Volume 1 (1744–1826), Lillywhite, 1862, p. 31.
  53. ^ Arthur Haygarth, Scores & Biographies, Volume 1 (1744–1826), Lillywhite, 1862, p. 433.
  54. ^ Kent won the toss and batted first, scoring 473 including 154 from Lord Harris to which MCC replied with 144 (James Fellowes took five for 49). Following on 329 behind, MCC scored 557 for nine including 344 from W. G. Grace, and the match was drawn. Grace's innings was the first ever first-class triple-century; five days later Grace scored the second triple century, 318* for Gloucestershire against Yorkshire at Cheltenham. This is the first record score that is recognised by all authorities. Scorecard
  55. ^ a b Lancashire won the toss and batted first, scoring 801, with centuries for Archie MacLaren (424) and Arthur Paul (177). Somerset replied with 143 and, following on, 206 (in their second innings Johnny Briggs took five for 78 and Arthur Mold took five for 76). MacLaren's 424 was the first quadruple-century in first-class cricket. Lancashire won by an innings and 452 runs. Scorecard
  56. ^ Queensland won the toss and decided to field first. Victoria scored 793, including centuries from Bill Ponsford (437) and "Stork" Hendry (129); Gordon Amos took five for 148. In reply Queensland made 189 (Don Blackie took six for 46) and, following on, 407 including 118 from Cecil Thompson; Bert Ironmonger took five for 88. Victoria won by an innings and 197 runs. Ponsford became the first man to break his own record for the highest first-class innings. Scorecard
  57. ^ a b In their Quaid-e-Azam Trophy semi-final, Karachi won the toss and put Bahawalpur in to bat. Bahawalpur scored 185. Karachi replied with 772 for seven declared, including centuries from Hanif Mohammad (499) and Wallis Mathias (103). Hanif was run out for the highest score in first-class cricket off the last ball of the third day of the match. In their second innings Bahawalpur scored 108, and Karachi won by an innings and 479 runs. Scorecard
  58. ^ a b Durham won the toss and batted first, scoring 556 for eight declared, including 204 for John Morris. In reply at the end of the second day Warwickshire were 210 for two, with Brian Lara 111* having been bowled by a no-ball on 12 and dropped by the wicket-keeper on 18. Rain prevented play on the third day and removed the possibility of either side playing for a win, so Lara batted on, scoring 390 runs on the final fourth day to end on 501*; when Lara reached 500, by hitting the penultimate ball of the day for four, Warwickshire declared with their total at 810 for four. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  59. ^ "Minor Cricket – Progressive Highest Individual Score". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  60. ^ "Norman Callaway". Cricinfo. 
  61. ^ Nottinghamshire won the toss and batted first. They had reached 308 for five, including 140 from Brian Bolus, when Garfield Sobers started his innings. Sobers scored a rapid 76 not out, including 6 sixes off an over from Malcolm Nash, whose final figures were four for 100 from 21 overs. Nottinghamshire declared on 394 for five, and Glamorgan replied with 254 including 104* from Peter Walker. In their second innings Nottinghamshire declared at 139 for six, and Glamorgan, set 280 to win, were dismissed for 113, Michael Taylor taking five for 47. Nottinghamshire won by 166 runs. Scorecard
  62. ^ Bombay won the toss and batted first, scoring 371 for four declared, including 170 retired hurt from Ghulam Parkar. In reply, Baroda made 330 for eight declared with 100* from Suresh Keshwala. In their second innings, Bombay were 201 for four when Ravi Shastri started his innings; he scored 200*, off 123 balls in just an hour and 53 minutes, the fastest ever double-century. He hit one over from Tilak Raj for 6 sixes; Raj's final figures were one for 88 from 10 overs. When Shastri reached his double-century, Bombay declared at 457 for five, setting Baroda 499 to win. Baroda were 81 for seven at the end of the match, and the game was drawn. Scorecard
  63. ^ Nottinghamshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 238 (Ernest Killick took five for 14). Sussex replied with 414, and Nottinghamshire were 185 for seven in their second innings, only 9 runs ahead, when Ted Alletson started his innings. Having scored 47 not out in 50 minutes before lunch on the last day, he cut loose after the interval, adding another 142 runs in just 40 minutes, scoring in total 189 in just an hour and a half. He hit one over from Killick for 34; Killick's final bowling analysis was one for 130 off 20 overs. Nottinghamshire's total was 412. Sussex, requiring 237 to win, were 213 for eight when the match ended and the game was drawn. Scorecard; Ted Alletson at Cricinfo
  64. ^ In a game played right at the end of the West Indians' tour of New Zealand, the Governor-General's XI (consisting of Australian, West Indian and New Zealand test players) won the toss and batted first, scoring 236; Lance Gibbs took five for 36. Richard Edwards scored 34 of the Governor-General's XI's last 35 runs, hitting 34 off Joey Carew's only over of the innings; Edwards was out for 34, which was to be his highest ever first-class innings. The West Indians replied with 256, Bruce Taylor taking five for 36. In their second innings, the Governor-General's XI scored 361 and the West Indians, requiring 342, made 318 to lose by 23 runs. Scorecard
  65. ^ Glamorgan won the toss and batted first, scoring 217; Jack Simmons took six for 74. Lancashire replied with 362 for three, including centuries from Barry Wood (155*) and Frank Hayes (119). In County Championship matches of this period the number of overs in the teams' first innings was restricted, and as time ran out in Lancashire's innings Hayes hit an over from Malcolm Nash for 34; Nash's final figures were none for 71 off 15 overs. In their second innings Glamorgan were 105 for three when the match was drawn. Scorecard
  66. ^ Lancashire won the toss and fielded first; Surrey scored 146 to which Lancashire replied with 151 for seven declared; Alex Tudor took five for 53 in Lancashire's first innings. This was the score at the start of the final day of the match, as there had been no play on the first day, and rain had interrupted both the second and third days. Surrey then scored 254 for one declared, including 126* from Nadeem Shahid, setting Lancashire 250 to win off 53 overs. Lancashire were 152 for two in the 34th over when Andrew Flintoff started his innings; he scored 61 from 24 balls, including 34 in an over from Tudor whose final figures for the innings were no wicket for 82 off 11 overs. Lancashire scored 250 for four, to win by six wickets. Scorecard; match report
  67. ^ Gloucestershire won the toss and batted first, scoring 305 for nine declared, including 103 from Phil Weston. Oxford UCCE replied with 116. Not enforcing the follow-on, Gloucestershire scored 490 for four declared in their second innings, including 216 off 168 balls from Craig Spearman; Spearman's innings included 34 off one over bowled by Stephen Moreton, whose first over in first-class cricket it was. Set 680, Oxford UCCE were 114 for six when the game ran out of time, and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  68. ^ Canterbury won the toss and fielded first; Wellington scored 202, and Canterbury replied with 221 for seven declared. In their second innings Wellington then scored 309 for six declared, including 156* from John Aiken. Set 291 to win, Canterbury collapsed to 108 for eight, but Lee Germon and Roger Ford appeared to be holding out for a draw on 196 for eight at the start of the penultimate over of the match. This over was bowled by Robert Vance, who agreed with his captain Ervin McSweeney that if they could give away enough runs then Canterbury might risk their last two wickets going for a win. Vance's over, containing a series of no-balls, cost 77; Germon scored 70 of them. During the mayhem the umpire lost count of the number of legitimate deliveries bowled, and called "over" after only five. The scoreboard operators also lost track during the over, so that as the last over of the match began no-one on the pitch knew the score. It later transpired that the Canterbury score had been 290 for eight as the last ball (which Ford did not attempt to score from) was bowled. Germon was on 160*. The match was drawn with the scores level. Scorecard; Cricinfo report.
  69. ^ Kent won the toss, and fielded first; Glamorgan scored 354 for seven declared, and Kent replied with 300 for six declared including 100 from Carl Hooper. As Glamorgan's second innings progressed, it became clear that Kent could not win by bowling Glamorgan out, so Mark Benson, the Kent captain, asked wicket-keeper Steve Marsh and batsman Graham Cowdrey to bowl; their five overs cost 112, and Glamorgan declared on 255 for four setting Kent 310 to win. Glamorgan's Matthew Maynard had scored 119*, including 34 runs off one of the overs bowled by Marsh. Kent's gamble did not pay off; they were dismissed for 273 including 118 from Trevor Ward (Robert Croft took six for 112), and Glamorgan won by 36 runs. Scorecard
  70. ^ Lancashire won the toss and batted, scoring 310, to which Glamorgan replied with 303 for five including 138* from Steve James. This was the state of the rain-affected match at the beginning of the final day. In order to manufacture a result, Glamorgan declared and batsmen Matthew Maynard and Tony Cottey then bowled 12 innocuous overs in the hope that Lancashire would score quickly, then declare and set a gettable target. Lancashire scored 235 for one declared, including 109* for Glen Chapple, in just 21 minutes. He took 32 and 34 off consecutive overs bowled by Cottey. Glamorgan lost three wickets in scoring the 243 they needed, to win by seven wickets. Scorecard
  71. ^ Western Province B won the toss and batted first, scoring 284 for four declared including 154 from HD Ackerman. Griqualand West replied with 285 for nine declared including 127 from Barry van der Vyver (Dean MacHelm took seven for 85). In their second innings Western Province B scored 259 for one declared against innocuous bowling, including 105* from Deon Jordaan and 128* from Barry Touzel. Touzel took 34 from one over bowled by Frans Viljoen. Set 259, Griqualand West scored 215 and lost by 43 runs. Scorecard
  72. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and fielded. The Indians scored 160 (Hedley Verity took five for 65), and Yorkshire replied with 161 for eight declared (Mohammad Nissar took five for 65). In their second innings the Indians were dismissed for 66 (George Macaulay took eight for 21). Nazir Ali, coming in at 2 for three, scored 52. Yorkshire scored 68 for four to win by six wickets. Scorecard
  73. ^ Hampshire won the toss and fielded first. Nottinghamshire made 143, including 105* from Clive Rice, who came in at 19 for two. Hampshire replied with 190. Nottinghamshire were then dismissed for 99 (Malcolm Marshall took five for 64, and Keith Stevenson took five for 32), and Hampshire scored 53 for one to win by nine wickets. Scorecard
  74. ^ Gujranwala won the toss and batted first. They scored 143 (Rizwan Malik scored 100* and Murtaza Hussain took five for 73) and then bowled Bahawalpur out for 95 (Ghulam Murtaza took five for 21). In their second innings, Gujranwala scored 372 for nine declared (Majid Saeed scored 128 and Mohammad Zaid took six for 106). Set 421 to win, Bahawalpur were 389 for seven (Bilal Khilji 150*) when time ran out and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  75. ^ This was an ICC Intercontinental Cup match. Kenya won the toss and fielded first. Namibia made 183 and Kenya replied with 229 (Bernie Burger took five for 68). In their second innings Namibia scored 282. Gerrie Snyman, who came in at 9 for two and was the last man out, scored 230 off 201 balls with 22 fours and 11 sixes. Kenya then scored 135 and Namibia won the match by 101 runs.Scorecard
  76. ^ In the final of the Bombay Pentangular Tournament, Hindus batted first and scored 581 for five declared, including centuries from Hemu Adhikari (186) and Vijay Merchant (250*). In reply, the Rest made 133 and, following on, 387 (C. S. Nayudu took five for 90). The Rest's second innings included 309 from Vijay Hazare, who came in to bat with his team on 14 for two; he shared in a partnership of 300 for the sixth wicket with his brother Vivek Hazare, who scored 21. Hindus won by an innings and 61 runs. Scorecard
  77. ^ Canterbury batted first and scored 309 including 110 from Gordon Leggat. Otago replied with 500, of which Bert Sutcliffe scored 385. In their second innings Canterbury were dismissed for 98, and Otago won by an innings and 93 runs. Scorecard
  78. ^ Glamorgan won the toss and batted first, scoring 309 for four (in the English County Championship at the time the first innings was limited to 100 overs). Worcestershire replied with 169 (Tony Cordle took five for 53). Turner carried his bat through their first innings for 141*; the next-best score was 7 from Norman Gifford batting at number 10. Glamorgan were 142 for seven in their second innings when the game ran out of time and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  79. ^ a b Wisden 2008
  80. ^ Essex won the toss and batted first, scoring 597 including 343* from Percy Perrin. Derbyshire replied with 548 including 229 from Charles Ollivierre (Bill Reeves took five for 192). In their second innings Essex were dismissed for 97 and Derbyshire, set 147 to win, knocked off the runs with the loss of only one wicket to win by nine wickets. Perrin's 343* is the highest score by a batsman whose team lost the match. Scorecard
  81. ^ England won the toss and batted first, scoring 546 for four declared, including centuries from John Edrich (310*) and Ken Barrington (163). In reply, New Zealand made 193 and, following on, 166. In their second innings Fred Titmus took five for 19. England won by an innings and 187 runs. Scorecard
  82. ^ Sargodha won the toss and fielded first. Gujranwala scored 261, including 117 from Qayyum-ul-Hasan. Sargodha replied with 721, including 394 from Naved Latif. Gujranwala were 60 for one in their second innings when the game ran out of time and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  83. ^ In this Ranji Trophy match, Maharashtra won the toss and elected to bat, scoring 764 for six declared. Kedar Jadhav scored 327 off only 312 balls, including 2 sixes and 54 fours; Rohit Motwani made 147. In reply, Uttar Pradesh reached 669 for seven, with 179 from Tanmay Srivastava, 126 from Mukul Dagar and 156 from only 140 balls from Piyush Chawla. The game ran out of time, and was drawn. Scorecard
  84. ^ Queensland won the toss and batted first, scoring 145. New South Wales replied with 763, including centuries from Charles Gregory (383) and Edgar "Gar" Waddy (100). In their second innings Queensland scored 316, Charles Barnes took five for 105. New South Wales won by an innings and 302 runs. Scorecard
  85. ^ South Australia won the toss and decided to field first. Western Australia scored 565 for three declared, with centuries from Mike Veletta (150) and Geoff Marsh (355*). South Australia replied with 366 including centuries from Paul Nobes (124) and Michael Bevan (114). Following on 199 behind, South Australia were 207 for four in their second innings when the game ran out of time, and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  86. ^ In their Ranji Trophy semi-final, Bombay won the toss and batted first, scoring 855 for six declared, including centuries from Sanjay Manjrekar (377), Dilip Vengsarkar (121) and Vinod Kambli (126). In reply Hyderabad scored 498 with centuries from Rayapeth Swaroop (123) and Maruti Sridhar (184). Electing not to enforce the follow-on and ensure their first innings lead was sufficient for them to be declared winners, Bombay scored 446 for four declared with centuries from Kambli (127) and Chandrakant Pandit (100*). Set 804 to win, Hyderabad were 36 for no wicket when the game ran out of time, and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  87. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 677 for seven declared, including 339 from Darren Lehmann. Durham replied with 518 including 151 from Dale Benkenstein and 155 from Ottis Gibson. Following on, Durham reached 181 for three declared, including 100* from Garry Park. Because the game had run out of time, the match was drawn. Scorecard
  88. ^ Worcestershire won the toss and batted first, scoring 571 (Daryl Mitchell made 298). Somerset replied with 280 and were asked to follow on. In their second innings, Somerset were 523 for eight (Zander de Bruyn scored 106, Gareth Andrew took five for 117) when time ran out. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  89. ^ Lions won the toss and fielded first. Warriors scored 532 (Ashwell Prince 154). Lions replied with 690 for nine. Stephen Cook scored 390 and Thami Tsolekile made 141. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  90. ^ a b Eagles won the toss and batted first, scoring 570 for nine declared; Dean Elgar scored 161 and Rilee Rossouw scored 319. Titans replied with 546 for nine declared, including 159 from Gulam Bodi. In their second innings Eagles were bowled out for 164, leaving Titans with 188 to get; they scored 190 for eight to win by two wickets. Rossouw's match aggregate of 383 runs is the most scored by one batsman for a losing team, and Elgar and Rossouw's first-innings partnership of 480 is the highest by two batsmen whose side lost. Scorecard
  91. ^ "Cricket Archive". Cricket Archive. 3 May 2004. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  92. ^ "Cricket Archive". Cricket Archive. 23 September 2006. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  93. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.com. 1995-08-26. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  94. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.com. 2011-05-21. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  95. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.com. 2011-11-27. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  96. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.com. 2014-04-14. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  97. ^ a b Steven Lynch (10 July 2006). "Unmasked: the slowest batsmen, and the worst". Wisden Cricinfo. Retrieved 2006-07-11. 
  98. ^ Seymour Clark, cricinfo.com. Retrieved 11 July 2006.
  99. ^ John Howarth, cricinfo.com. Retrieved 11 July 2006.
  100. ^ "Scoreless Sequences of Individual Innings". Retrieved 2006-07-11. 
  101. ^ "Nottinghamshire v Surrey in 1865". Cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  102. ^ "First-Class Batting and Fielding in Each Season by James Shaw". Cricketarchive.com. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  103. ^ Webber, Roy; The Playfair Book of Cricket Records; p. 317. Published 1951 by Playfair Books.
  104. ^ "Warwickshire v Sussex in 1954". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 1954-05-21. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  105. ^ "First-Class Batting in Each Season by Billy Bestwick". Cricketarchive.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  106. ^ Cricket record lists do not keep records for lowest batting average, but Bailey, Phillip; Thorn, Phillip; and Wynne-Thomas, Peter; The Complete Who’s Who of Cricketers (ISBN 0600346927) shows nobody with nearly so low an average
  107. ^ "Cricket Archive". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  108. ^ a b "Cricket Archive". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  109. ^ England won the toss and batted first, scoring 120 (Edmund Hinkly took six wickets). Kent replied with 90 (John Wisden took seven wickets). In their second innings England made 74 (Hinkly took all ten wickets) and they then dismissed Kent for 49 (Wisden took five wickets). England won by 55 runs. Scorecard
  110. ^ South of England batted first and scored 36 (William Clarke took six wickets), and North of England replied with 131 (Thomas Sherman took six wickets). In their second innings South of England made 76, all ten batsmen were out bowled Wisden. North of England won by an innings and 19 runs. Scorecard
  111. ^ Warwickshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 170. Nottinghamshire replied with 135 (Eric Hollies took ten for 49, including seven bowled and three lbw). In their second innings Warwickshire made 113. Set 149, Nottinghamshire made 150 for three to win by seven wickets. Scorecard
  112. ^ Nottinghamshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 234; Yorkshire replied with 163 (Harold Larwood took five for 73). In their second innings Nottinghamshire made 67 (Hedley Verity took ten for 10 off 19.4 overs including 16 maidens). Yorkshire openers Percy Holmes and Herbert Sutcliffe knocked off the target of 139, and Yorkshire won by ten wickets. Scorecard
  113. ^ The International XI batted first, and scored 262 (Sylvester Clarke took five for 26). The West Indies XI, including test batsmen Gordon Greenidge, Desmond Haynes, Lawrence Rowe and Clive Lloyd, replied with 419 (Eddie Hemmings took ten for 175 from 49.3 overs). No play was possible on the last day and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  114. ^ England won the toss and batted first, scoring 459, including centuries from Peter Richardson (104) and David Sheppard (113). Australia replied with 84 (Jim Laker took nine for 37) and, following on, 205 (Laker took ten for 53). England won by an innings and 170 runs. The remaining Australian wicket (the third wicket to fall in their first innings) was taken by Tony Lock, England's other front-line spinner, who bowled more overs in the match than Laker. Scorecard
  115. ^ Canada won the toss and batted first, scoring 221 (John Davison top-scored with 84, and Nasir Javed took five for 78). In reply, USA made 136 (Davison took eight for 61). In their second innings Canada made 145. Set 231 to win, USA made 126 (Davison took nine for 76), and Canada won by 104 runs. Scorecard
  116. ^ "Most hat-tricks in career". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  117. ^ Middlesex won the toss and batted first. They scored 286, and Somerset replied with 236 (Frank Tarrant took six for 47). In their second innings Middlesex scored 213 . Set 264 to win, Somerset made 97. Albert Trott took four wickets in four balls, and then finished the innings with another hat-trick for innings figures of seven for 20. Middlesex won by 166 runs. Scorecard
  118. ^ Services won the toss and fielded first. Northern Punjab scored 108, to which Services replied with 308 (Manohar Khanna took five for 126). In their second innings Northern Punjab were dismissed for 132. Joginder Rao took two hat-tricks in the innings and finished with innings figures of seven for 30. Services won by an innings and 68 runs. Scorecard. Rao had also taken a hat-trick in the first innings of his previous match, his début, against Jammu and Kashmir. Scorecard
  119. ^ "Two hat-tricks in the same match". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  120. ^ a b "Four wickets in four balls". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  121. ^ Leicestershire won the toss and batted first, scoring 168, to which Nottinghamshire replied with 338. In their second innings Leicestershire scored 222. Alan Walker took five for 75, including a hat-trick with the first three balls of the innings – after taking the last Leicestershire wicket of the first innings. Nottinghamshire scored 53 for one in their second innings to win by nine wickets. Scorecard
  122. ^ Warwickshire won the toss and batted first. They were dismissed for 28, Bill Copson's figures of eight for 11 including the last four wickets of the innings in four balls. Derbyshire scored 227 (Joseph Mayer took five for 83). In their second innings Warwickshire made 291 (Aubrey Hill scored 105; Tommy Mitchell took five for 80). Copson took a wicket with his second ball of the innings, to achieve a spell of five wickets in six balls. Derbyshire scored 93 for five in their second innings (Mayer took five for 39) to win by five wickets. Scorecard
  123. ^ N. E. Transvaal won the toss and batted first, scoring 71 (Dudley Sparks took six for 21). In reply Orange Free State scored 94 (Lennox Brown took six for 55). In their second inning N. E. Transvaal scored 414 for seven declared (Raymond Currer scored 150 and Robert Hicks 121). Requiring 392 to win, Orange Free State were dismissed for 46. William Henderson took seven for 4, including four wickets in four balls and five wickets in six balls. N. E. Transvaal won by 345 runs. Scorecard
  124. ^ Surrey scored 300 for four declared and Sussex replied with 226 for five declared (Roger Prideaux scored 106*). In their second innings Surrey declared at 130 for five to set Sussex 205 to win. With three overs left Sussex were 187 for one. Pocock bowled the next over, w · w 2 · w. Sussex scored 11 off the next over, so when Pocock started the final over Sussex needed 5 to win. The over went w w w 1 w 1w, the final wicket falling to a run out as the batsmen attempted a second run. Pocock took five wickets in 6 balls, six wickets in 9 balls and seven wickets in 11 balls. Pocock's bowling figures were seven for 67. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  125. ^ Rawalpindi won the toss and asked Faisalabad to bat first. Faisalabad scored 64 (Yasir Arafat took five for 22) to which Rawalpindi replied with 148. In their second innings Faisalabad made 164 (Yasir took four for 45). Having taken the last four wickets of the Faisalabad first innings in five balls, Yasir took a wicket with his first ball of the second innings to complete a hat-trick and five wickets in six balls. Rawalpindi scored 83 for four to win by six wickets. Scorecard
  126. ^ Otago won the toss and batted, scoring 441 for eight declared with 122* from Derek de Boorder. In their reply Wellington were bowled out for 148, Neil Wagner taking six for 36. Wagner's spell included an over in which he took five wickets: w w w w · w. Following on, Wellington were bowled out for 155 to lose by an innings and 138 runs. Scorecard
  127. ^ a b "Cricket Archive". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  128. ^ a b "Cricinfo – Records – First-class matches – Most dismissals in career". Uk.cricinfo.com. 17 June 2008. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  129. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.com. 2011-11-20. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  130. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 1992-12-01. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  131. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 1996-04-21. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  132. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 1928-08-17. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  133. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 1957-06-07. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  134. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 1966-07-26. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  135. ^ "Scorecard". Cricketarchive.co.uk. 2011-08-04. Retrieved 2014-08-08. 
  136. ^ In the first Test, South Africa won the toss and elected to bat first. They scored 169. In reply Sri Lanka scored 756 for five declared including centuries from Kumar Sangakkara (287) and Mahela Jayawardene (374). Sangakkara and Jayawardene added 624 for the third wicket. In their second innings South Africa made 434 (Muttiah Muralitharan took six for 131). Sri Lanka won by an innings and 153 runs. Scorecard
  137. ^ Water and Power Development Authority (WPDA) won the toss and asked Sui Southern Gas Corporation (SSGC) to bat. SSGC scored 466 (Saeed Bin Nasir scored 129). In reply, WPDA scored 671 for two. Rafatullah Mohmand scored 302* and Aamer Sajjad made 289. Rafatullah and Aamer added a record 580 for the second wicket. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  138. ^ Baroda batted first, scoring 202 (Vijay Hazare took six for 85). In reply, Baroda scored 784, with centuries from Hazare (288) and Gul Mohammad (319). Hazare and Mohammad added a record 577 for the fourth wicket. In their second innings Holkar were dismissed for 173 (Amir Elahi took six for 62) and Baroda won by an innings and 409 runs. Scorecard
  139. ^ Quetta batted first and scored 104, to which Karachi Whites replied with 561 for one declared including 324 from Waheed Mirza and 224* from Mansoor Akhtar. Their partnership of 561 was the highest for the first wicket. In their second innings Quetta were dismissed for 163, and Karachi Whites won by an innings and 294 runs. Scorecard
  140. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 555 for one declared. Yorkshire's openers Percy Holmes (who scored 224*) and Herbert Sutcliffe (313) added 555 for the first wicket. In reply Essex made 78 (Hedley Verity took five for 8) and, following on, 164 (Verity took five for 45), and Yorkshire won by an innings and 313 runs. Scorecard
  141. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 662, including centuries from Jack Brown (300) and John Tunnicliffe (243). Openers Brown and Tunnicliffe put on 554 for Yorkshire's first wicket. In reply Derbyshire made 118 and, following on, 157. Yorkshire won by an innings and 387 runs. Scorecard
  142. ^ In this Ranji Trophy match, Saurashtra won the toss and elected to field. Gujarat scored 600 for nine declared, with 159 from Manprit Juneja and 160* from Rujul Bhatt. In reply, Saurashtra made 716 for three; Sagar Jogiyani (who scored 282) and Ravindra Jadeja (303*) added 539 for the third wicket. The match was drawn. Scorecard
  143. ^ Yorkshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 532 all out (Anthony McGrath 115; Imran Tahir took six for 132). In response Michael Carberry and Neil McKenzie saw Hampshire from 59 for two to 582 for three; McKenzie scored 237, and Hampshire declared at 599 for three when Carberry reached 300*. In their second innings Yorkshire were 40 for no wicket when the teams agreed on a draw. Scorecard
  144. ^ Saurashtra won the toss and batted first, scoring 620 for four declared. Cheteshwar Pujara (302*) and Ravindra Jadeja (232* – his first hundred in first-class cricket) added a record unbroken 520 for the fifth wicket. Saurashtra then bowled Orissa out for 302 and 234 (Jadeja took five for 44) to win by an innings and 84 runs. Scorecard
  145. ^ Trinidad batted first and scored 490 for eight declared, including 210 from Jeff Stollmeyer. Barbados replied with 650 for three declared, including 308* from Frank Worrell and 218* from John Goddard. Worrell and Goddard added 502 unbroken for the fourth wicket. Trinidad were 70 for four in their second innings when the game ran out of time, and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  146. ^ East Zone won the toss and elected to field first. Central Zone scored 655 for seven declared; Marshall Ayub, who scored 289, and Mehrab Hossain, Jr., who made 218, added 494 for the fifth wicket, a Bangladeshi record. East Zone's reply stood at 396 for eight when the match ran out of time and was declared a draw. scorecard
  147. ^ Sussex won the toss and batted first, scoring 512 for three declared. Sussex openers Ted Bowley (who scored 283) and John Langridge (195) put on 490 for Sussex's first wicket. Middlesex replied with 290 and, following on, 157. James Langridge took five for 33 in Middlesex's second innings. Sussex won by an innings and 65 runs. Scorecard
  148. ^ Jamaica won the toss and batted first, scoring 702 for five declared, including 344* from George Headley and 261* from Clarence Passailaigue. Headley and Passailaigue added 487 unbroken for the sixth wicket. Lord Tennyson's XI replied with 354, including 105 from George Kemp-Welch (Tommy Scott took six for 146) and, following on, 251. Jamaica won by an innings and 97 runs. Scorecard
  149. ^ In their Ranji Trophy semi-final, Delhi won the toss and batted first, scoring 554, including centuries from Raman Lamba (165) and Ajay Sharma (240). Punjab's reply stood at 298 for six when wicket-keeper Pankaj Dharmani joined Bupinder Singh; they added 460 for the seventh wicket, Bupinder scoring 297 and Pankaj scoring 202*. When the game ran out of time Punjab's score was 780 for eight, and the match was drawn. Punjab's first-innings lead saw them through to the final. Scorecard
  150. ^ Canterbury won the toss and batted first, scoring 92. In reply, the Australians score was 209 for seven when Victor Trumper joined Arthur Sims; they added 433 for the eighth wicket, Sims scoring 184*, and Trumper 293. The Australians made 653 (Tom Carlton took six for 142), and then bowled Canterbury out for 197 (Jack Crawford took five for 60) to win by an innings and 364 runs. Scorecard
  151. ^ Warwickshire won the toss and batted first, scoring 504 for seven declared, including 216 from Crowther Charlesworth. In reply, Derbyshire made 262 (Frank Foster took five for 62). Following-on, Derbyshire were 131 for eight, still 111 behind, when John Chapman joined Arnold Warren; they added 283 for the ninth wicket, Warren scoring 123 and Chapman 165. Derbyshire made 430 and Warwickshire, set 189 to win, were 63 for two when the game ran out of time and the match was drawn. Scorecard
  152. ^ Victoria won the toss and elected to bat first, scoring 376 including centuries from Jack Ryder (175) and Ted a'Beckett (113). In reply, New South Wales were 113 for nine when Hal Hooker joined Alan Kippax. They added 307 for the last wicket; Kippax scored 260* and Hooker 62, and New South Wales total was 420. In their second innings Victoria scored 251 for eight declared. New South Wales, set 208 to win, were 156 for two when the match ran out of time and was drawn. Scorecard

References[edit]

External links[edit]