List of diets

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An individual's diet is the sum of food and drink that he or she habitually consumes. Dieting is the practice of attempting to achieve or maintain a certain weight through diet.[1] People's dietary choices are often affected by a variety of factors, including ethical and religious beliefs, clinical need, or a desire to control weight.

Not all diets are considered healthy. Some people follow unhealthy diets through habit, rather than through a conscious choice to eat unhealthily. Terms applied to such eating habits include "junk food diet" and "Western diet". Many diets are considered by clinicians to pose significant health risks and minimal long-term benefit. This is particularly true of "crash" or "fad" diets – short-term weight-loss plans that involve drastic changes to a person's normal eating habits.

Only diets covered on Wikipedia are listed.

Belief-based diets[edit]

Some people's dietary choices are influenced by their religious, spiritual or philosophical beliefs.

Vegetarian diets[edit]

Main article: Vegetarianism

A vegetarian diet is one which excludes meat. Vegetarians also avoid food containing by-products of animal slaughter, such as animal-derived rennet and gelatin.[8]

Semi-vegetarian diets[edit]

Main article: Semi-vegetarianism

Weight control diets[edit]

Main article: Dieting

A desire to lose weight is a common motivation to change dietary habits, as is a desire to maintain an existing weight. Many weight loss diets are considered by some to entail varying degrees of health risk, and some are not widely considered to be effective. This is especially true of "crash" or "fad" diets.

Many of the diets listed below could fall into more than one subcategory. Where this is the case, it is noted in that diet's entry.

Low-calorie diets[edit]

Main article: Calorie restriction

Very low calorie diets[edit]

Main article: Very low calorie diet

A very low calorie diet is consuming fewer than 800 calories per day. Such diets are normally followed under the supervision of a doctor.[16]

Zero-calorie diets are also included.

Low-carbohydrate diets[edit]

Main article: Low-carbohydrate diet

Low-fat diets[edit]

Main article: low-fat diet

Crash diets[edit]

Crash diet and fad diet are general terms. They describe diet plans which involve making extreme, rapid changes to food consumption, but are also used as disparaging terms for common eating habits which are considered unhealthy. Both types of diet are often considered to pose health risks.[23] Many of the diets listed here are weight-loss diets which would also fit into other sections of this list. Where this is the case, it will be noted in that diet's entry.

Detox diets[edit]

Main article: Detox diet

Detox diets involve either not consuming or attempting to flush out substances that are considered unhelpful or harmful. Examples include restricting food consumption to foods without colourings or preservatives, taking supplements, or drinking large amounts of water. The latter practise in particular has drawn criticism, as drinking significantly more water than recommended levels can cause hyponatremia.[33]

Diets followed for medical reasons[edit]

People's dietary choices are sometimes affected by intolerance or allergy to certain types of food. There are also dietary patterns that might be recommended, prescribed or administered by medical professionals for people with specific medical needs.

Other diets[edit]

Basket of fresh fruit and vegetables grown in Israel
A group of people in winter clothing, standing around piles of meat lying on the snow.
Sharing of frozen, aged walrus meat among Inuit families.
Kangaroo meat at the Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne
An assortment of foods on a worktop. They are: tofu, wheat miso, bancha tea, umeboshi prumes brown rice, sea salt and nori.
Some common macrobiotic ingredients

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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