List of diasporas

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History provides us with many examples of notable diasporas.

Note: the list below is not definitive, and includes groups that have not been given significant historical attention. Whether the migration of some of the groups listed fulfills the conditions required to be considered a diaspora may be open for debate.

Eurominority.eu map (the European Union) Peoples of the World, includes some diasporas and underrepresented/ stateless ethnic groups - [1]

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"Speak French, Be Clean" written across the wall of a Southern French school, a byproduct of the French Government policy to eradicate Occitan and all regional languages in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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The Five congressional districts in Oklahoma. The Map shows districts 1 and 2 with parts of 3 4 and 5 are former Indian Territory from 1830 to 1907. The largest American Indian tribal groups live there in the eastern half of the state, most notably the Cherokee, Choctaw and Creek Indian Nations, whose populations mostly live outside of them.

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Sticker from the American Indian activist community of West Philadelphia in Philadelphia PA US.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bengali Hindu diaspora
  2. ^ Germans and foreigners with an immigrant background. 156 is the estimate which counts all people claiming ethnic German ancestry in the U.S., Brazil, Argentina, and elsewhere.
  3. ^ "Ethnic Groups of Europe: An Encyclopedia" by Jeffrey Cole (2011), page 171.
  4. ^ "Report on German population". Histclo.com. 4 February 2010. Retrieved 2013-01-07. 
  5. ^ http://www.indiandiaspora.nic.in/
  6. ^ Morris, Benny: Righteous Victims: A History of the Zionist-Arab Conflict, 1881–2001, Vintage Books, ISBN 978-0-679-74475-7, 2001, chap. VI.
  7. ^ "How Arabs stole Jewish property". Ynet. Retrieved 2011-07-27. 
  8. ^ Schwartz, Adi (January 4, 2008). "All I Wanted was Justice". Haaretz. 
  9. ^ Malka Hillel Shulewitz, The Forgotten Millions: The Modern Jewish Exodus from Arab Lands, Continuum 2001, pp. 139 and 155.
  10. ^ Ada Aharoni "The Forced Migration of Jews from Arab Countries, Historical Society of Jews from Egypt website. Accessed February 1, 2009.
  11. ^ Dror Yemini, Ben (May 16, 2009). "The Jewish Nakba: Expulsions, Massacres and Forced Conversions". Maariv (in Hebrew). Retrieved June 23, 2009. 
  12. ^ www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org
  13. ^ http://www.molokane.org/places/Mexico/
  14. ^ http://www.slate.com/articles/business/dispatches/2012/12/swedish_migrant_workers_and_norwegian_oil_wealth_have_reversed_the_centuries.html
  15. ^ http://www.thelocal.no/20131008/a-fifth-of-young-workers-in-oslo-are-now-swedish-report