List of counties in Oklahoma

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There are 77 counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Oklahoma is ranked 20th size and 17th in the number of counties, between Mississippi with 82 counties and Arkansas with 75 counties.[1]

Oklahoma originally had seven counties (Logan, Cleveland, Oklahoma, Canadian, Kingfisher, Payne, and Beaver) when it was first organized as the Oklahoma Territory. These counties were designated numerically, first through seventh. New counties added after this were designated by letters of the alphabet. The first seven counties were later renamed. The Oklahoma Constitutional Convention named all of the counties that were formed when Oklahoma entered statehood in 1907. Only two counties have been formed since then.[2]

According to the Oklahoma Constitution, a county can be disorganized if the sum of all taxable property is less than two and a half million dollars. If so, then a petition must be signed by one-fourth of the population and then a vote would occur. If a majority vote for dissolution of the county, the county will be combined with an adjacent county with the lowest valuation of taxable property.[3]

The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code, which is used by the United States government to uniquely identify counties, is provided with each entry. The FIPS code for each county links to census data for that county.

The Area in these tables is land area, and does not include water area.

Oklahoma's postal abbreviation is OK and its FIPS state code is 40.

Alphabetical list[edit]

County
FIPS code
[4]
County seat
[5]
Established
[5]
Origin
Etymology
[6]
Population
[7]
Area
[5]
Map
Adair County001Stilwell1907Cherokee lands[8]William Penn Adair, Cherokee tribal leader and Confederate colonel in the American Civil War [8]22,683576 sq mi
(1,492 km2)
State map highlighting Adair County
Alfalfa County003Cherokee1907Woods CountyWilliam H. "Alfalfa Bill" Murray, ninth Governor of Oklahoma[9]5,642867 sq mi
(2,246 km2)
State map highlighting Alfalfa County
Atoka County005Atoka1907Choctaw landsCaptain Atoka, a noted Choctaw leader and signer of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek[10]14,182978 sq mi
(2,533 km2)
State map highlighting Atoka County
Beaver County007Beaver1890Seventh County (entire panhandle until 1907)[11]The Beaver River[12]5,6361,814 sq mi
(4,698 km2)
State map highlighting Beaver County
Beckham County009Sayre1907Greer County and Roger Mills County[13]J. C. W. Beckham, Governor of Kentucky[13]22,119902 sq mi
(2,336 km2)
State map highlighting Beckham County
Blaine County011Watonga1890Part of Cheyenne and Arapaho reservation.[14]James G. Blaine, Speaker of the U. S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senator and Secretary of State[15]11,943929 sq mi
(2,406 km2)
State map highlighting Blaine County
Bryan County013Durant1907Choctaw landsWilliam Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State, famous orator and three-time U.S. Presidential candidate[16]42,416909 sq mi
(2,354 km2)
State map highlighting Bryan County
Caddo County015Anadarko1901Indian TerritoryFrom Indian word "Kaddi" meaning life or chief[17]29,6001,278 sq mi
(3,310 km2)
State map highlighting Caddo County
Canadian County017El Reno1901Part of Cheyenne and Arapaho reservation[18]The Canadian River.[19]115,541900 sq mi
(2,331 km2)
State map highlighting Canadian County
Carter County019Ardmore1907Pickens County, Chickasaw NationA prominent family of early settlers[20]47,557824 sq mi
(2,134 km2)
State map highlighting Carter County
Cherokee County021Tahlequah1907Originally settled by Cherokee Indians following the Trail of TearsCherokee Nation of Indians[21]46,987751 sq mi
(1,945 km2)
State map highlighting Cherokee County
Choctaw County023Hugo1907Choctaw NationChoctaw Nation of Indians[22]15,205774 sq mi
(2,005 km2)
State map highlighting Choctaw County
Cimarron County025Boise City1907Seventh County (entire panhandle until 1907)[11]Cimarron River[23]2,4751,835 sq mi
(4,753 km2)
State map highlighting Cimarron County
Cleveland County027Norman1890County 3 in Oklahoma Territory.Grover Cleveland, twice President of the United States[24]255,755536 sq mi
(1,388 km2)
State map highlighting Cleveland County
Coal County029Coalgate1907Tobucksy County, Choctaw NationCoal, the primary economic product of the region at the time[25]5,925518 sq mi
(1,342 km2)
State map highlighting Coal County
Comanche County031Lawton1907Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache reservationSpanish "Camino Ancho", meaning broad trail[26]124,0981,069 sq mi
(2,769 km2)
State map highlighting Comanche County
Cotton County033Walters1912Lands of Quapaws, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Comanche Reservation, and Big PastureThe principal economic base of the county, cotton[27]6,193637 sq mi
(1,650 km2)
State map highlighting Cotton County
Craig County035Vinita1907Cherokee NationGranville Craig, a prominent Cherokee planter[28]15,029761 sq mi
(1,971 km2)
State map highlighting Craig County
Creek County037Sapulpa1907Creek NationCreek Nation of Indians[29]69,967956 sq mi
(2,476 km2)
State map highlighting Creek County
Custer County039Arapaho1891Cheyenne-Arapaho ReservationGeorge A. Custer, United States Army cavalry commander during the Indian Wars[30]27,469987 sq mi
(2,556 km2)
State map highlighting Custer County
Delaware County041Jay1907Delaware District of Cherokee NationDelaware Nation of Indians [2]41,487741 sq mi
(1,919 km2)
State map highlighting Delaware County
Dewey County043Taloga1892Cheyenne-Arapaho ReservationAdmiral George Dewey, hero of the Spanish-American War [31]4,8101,000 sq mi
(2,590 km2)
State map highlighting Dewey County
Ellis County045Arnett1907Roger Mills and Woodward countiesAlbert H. Ellis, member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention and first state Legislature[32]4,1511,229 sq mi
(3,183 km2)
State map highlighting Ellis County
Garfield County047Enid1893Cherokee OutletJames Garfield, President of the United States[33]60,5801,058 sq mi
(2,740 km2)
State map highlighting Garfield County
Garvin County049Pauls Valley1907Chickasaw NationSamuel Garvin, a prominent Chickasaw Indian and local merchant[34]27,576809 sq mi
(2,095 km2)
State map highlighting Garvin County
Grady County051Chickasha1907Pickens County, Chickasaw NationHenry W. Grady, editor of the Atlanta Constitution[35]52,4311,101 sq mi
(2,852 km2)
State map highlighting Grady County
Grant County053Medford1892Originally "L" countyUlysses S. Grant, President of the United States[36]4,5271,001 sq mi
(2,593 km2)
State map highlighting Grant County
Greer County055Mangum1896Greer County, TexasJohn Alexander Greer, Lieutenant Governor of Texas[37]6,239639 sq mi
(1,655 km2)
State map highlighting Greer County
Harmon County057Hollis1909Greer CountyJudson Harmon, U.S. Attorney General and Governor of Ohio[38]2,922538 sq mi
(1,393 km2)
State map highlighting Harmon County
Harper County059Buffalo1893Woodward CountyOscar G. Harper, clerk of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention[39]3,6851,039 sq mi
(2,691 km2)
State map highlighting Harper County
Haskell County061Stigler1907San Bois County of the Choctaw NationCharles N. Haskell, first Governor of Oklahoma[40]12,769577 sq mi
(1,494 km2)
State map highlighting Haskell County
Hughes County063Holdenville1907Choctaw Nation and Creek Nation landsWilliam C. Hughes, member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention[2][41]14,003807 sq mi
(2,090 km2)
State map highlighting Hughes County
Jackson County065Altus1907Greer CountyEither Stonewall Jackson, Confederate general during the American Civil War[42] or Andrew Jackson, seventh President of the United States[2]26,446803 sq mi
(2,080 km2)
State map highlighting Jackson County
Jefferson County067Waurika1907Comanche County and part of Chickasaw NationThomas Jefferson, third President of the United States[43]6,472759 sq mi
(1,966 km2)
State map highlighting Jefferson County
Johnston County069Tishomingo1907Chickasaw Nation landDouglas H. Johnston, Governor of the Chickasaw Nation[44]10,957645 sq mi
(1,671 km2)
State map highlighting Johnston County
Kay County071Newkirk1895Cherokee StripOriginally designated as county "K"[45]46,562919 sq mi
(2,380 km2)
State map highlighting Kay County
Kingfisher County073Kingfisher1907Unassigned LandsEither for the kingfisher bird[2] or King David Fisher, an early settler in the area[46]15,034903 sq mi
(2,339 km2)
State map highlighting Kingfisher County
Kiowa County075Hobart1901Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Indian ReservationsKiowa Nation of Indians [47]9,4461,015 sq mi
(2,629 km2)
State map highlighting Kiowa County
Latimer County077Wilburton1907Choctaw Nation landJames S. Latimer, member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention[48]11,154722 sq mi
(1,870 km2)
State map highlighting Latimer County
Le Flore County079Poteau1907Choctaw Nation[49]A Choctaw Indian family of French descent[2]50,3841,586 sq mi
(4,108 km2)
State map highlighting Le Flore County
Lincoln County081Chandler1891County A in Oklahoma TerritoryAbraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States34,273959 sq mi
(2,484 km2)
State map highlighting Lincoln County
Logan County083Guthrie1891County 1 in Oklahoma TerritoryJohn A. Logan, American Civil War general41,848745 sq mi
(1,930 km2)
State map highlighting Logan County
Love County085Marietta1907Pickens County, Chickasaw Nation, Indian TerritoryOverton Love, Chickasaw judge and prominent landowner9,423515 sq mi
(1,334 km2)
State map highlighting Love County
Major County093Fairview1909Woods County, Oklahoma TerritoryJohn C. Major, member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention7,527957 sq mi
(2,479 km2)
State map highlighting Major County
Marshall County095Madill1907Pickens County, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory[50]The maiden name of a member of the Constitutional Convention's mother15,840371 sq mi
(961 km2)
State map highlighting Marshall County
Mayes County097Pryor1907Saline District, Cherokee Nation[51]Cherokee leader Samuel Houston Mayes41,259656 sq mi
(1,699 km2)
State map highlighting Mayes County
McClain County087Purcell1907Choctaw Nation landCharles M. McClain, member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention34,506570 sq mi
(1,476 km2)
State map highlighting McClain County
McCurtain County089Idabel1907[19]The McCurtain family, a prominent Choctaw landowning group33,1511,852 sq mi
(4,797 km2)
State map highlighting McCurtain County
McIntosh County091Eufaula1907Choctaw Nation land[52]The McIntosh family, a prominent Creek landowning group20,252620 sq mi
(1,606 km2)
State map highlighting McIntosh County
Murray County099Sulphur1907Chickasaw Nation landGovernor of Oklahoma William H. "Alfalfa Bill" Murray13,488418 sq mi
(1,083 km2)
State map highlighting Murray County
Muskogee County101Muskogee1907Muskogee District of Creek Nation and part of Illinois and Canadian Districts of Cherokee Nation[53]Muskogee Nation of Indians70,990814 sq mi
(2,108 km2)
State map highlighting Muskogee County
Noble County103Perry1897County P in Oklahoma Territory.[54]U.S. Secretary of the Interior John W. Noble11,561732 sq mi
(1,896 km2)
State map highlighting Noble County
Nowata County105Nowata1907Cooweescoowee District of Cherokee Nation[55]The town of Nowata, Oklahoma. The exact origin is unknown, but the two most common stories are that railroad surveyors used the Delaware word noweta for welcome or that a sign was posted indicating that local springs had no water: No wata10,536565 sq mi
(1,463 km2)
State map highlighting Nowata County
Okfuskee County107Okemah1907Creek Nation landCreek town of the same name in Cleburn County, Alabama12,191625 sq mi
(1,619 km2)
State map highlighting Okfuskee County
Oklahoma County109Oklahoma City1891Unassigned Lands in Indian Territory, the County 2 in Oklahoma Territory[56]From two Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning people and red718,633709 sq mi
(1,836 km2)
State map highlighting Oklahoma County
Okmulgee County111Okmulgee1907Creek Nation landCreek word meaning boiling water40,069697 sq mi
(1,805 km2)
State map highlighting Okmulgee County
Osage County113Pawhuska1907Contiguous with Osage ReservationThe Osage Indian Reservation, inhabited by the Osage Nation47,4722,251 sq mi
(5,830 km2)
State map highlighting Osage County
Ottawa County115Miami1907Multiple tribal reservations in Indian Territory.[57]Ottawa Native American people31,848471 sq mi
(1,220 km2)
State map highlighting Ottawa County
Pawnee County117Pawnee1897Cherokee Outlet, then County Q in Oklahoma Territory[58]The Skidi Pawnee Native American people16,577570 sq mi
(1,476 km2)
State map highlighting Pawnee County
Payne County119Stillwater1890County 6 in Oklahoma Territory in 1889, renamed to Payne County in 1907[59]David L. Payne, the key figure in opening Oklahoma to white settlement77,350686 sq mi
(1,777 km2)
State map highlighting Payne County
Pittsburg County121McAlester1907Choctaw Nation land[60]Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania45,8371,306 sq mi
(3,383 km2)
State map highlighting Pittsburg County
Pontotoc County123Ada1907Chickasaw Nation[61]Pontotoc is a Chickasaw word meaning cat tails growing on the prairie37,492720 sq mi
(1,865 km2)
State map highlighting Pontotoc County
Pottawatomie County125Shawnee1891Creek Nation and Seminole Nation lands.[62]The Pottawatomie Native American people69,442788 sq mi
(2,041 km2)
State map highlighting Pottawatomie County
Pushmataha County127Antlers1907Pushmataha District of the Choctaw Nation[63]The Pushmataha District of the Choctaw Nation11,5721,397 sq mi
(3,618 km2)
State map highlighting Pushmataha County
Roger Mills County129Cheyenne1895County F in Oklahoma Territory[64]U.S. Senator Roger Q. Mills3,6471,142 sq mi
(2,958 km2)
State map highlighting Roger Mills County
Rogers County131Claremore1907Cooweescoowee District, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory[65]Clem V. Rogers, a member of the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention and the father of entertainer Will Rogers86,905675 sq mi
(1,748 km2)
State map highlighting Rogers County
Seminole County133Wewoka1907Seminole Nation[66]The Seminole Native American people25,482632 sq mi
(1,637 km2)
State map highlighting Seminole County
Sequoyah County135Sallisaw1907Sequoyah District and part of Illinois District, Cherokee NationSequoyah (George Guess), invented the Cherokee syllabary[67]42,391674 sq mi
(1,746 km2)
State map highlighting Sequoyah County
Stephens County137Duncan1907Comanche County, Oklahoma TerritoryJohn Hall Stephens, a Texas congressman and advocate of Oklahoma statehood45,048877 sq mi
(2,271 km2)
State map highlighting Stephens County
Texas County139Guymon1907Seventh County (entire panhandle until 1907)[11]The neighboring U.S. state of Texas20,6402,037 sq mi
(5,276 km2)
State map highlighting Texas County
Tillman County141Frederick1907Comanche County, Oklahoma[68]U.S. Senator Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina7,992872 sq mi
(2,258 km2)
State map highlighting Tillman County
Tulsa County143Tulsa1907Cherokee Nation and Creek Nation land.Derived from Tulsey Town, Alabama, an old Creek settlement.603,403570 sq mi
(1,476 km2)
State map highlighting Tulsa County
Wagoner County145Wagoner1907Cherokee Nation land[69]Bailey P. Waggoner, attorney of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, which established the town of Wagoner[6]73,085563 sq mi
(1,458 km2)
State map highlighting Wagoner County
Washington County147Bartlesville1907Cooweescoowee District of Cherokee Nation.[70]First President of the United States George Washington50,976417 sq mi
(1,080 km2)
State map highlighting Washington County
Washita County149Cordell1897County H in Oklahoma Territory[71]The Washita River11,6291,004 sq mi
(2,600 km2)
State map highlighting Washita County
Woods County151Alva1893County M in Oklahoma Territory.[72]Kansas populist and territorial legislator Samuel Newitt Wood8,8781,287 sq mi
(3,333 km2)
State map highlighting Woods County
Woodward County153Woodward1893County N in Oklahoma Territory[73]Santa Fe Railroad director B. W. Woodward20,0811,242 sq mi
(3,217 km2)
State map highlighting Woodward County

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How Many Counties are in Your State?". Click and Learn. Retrieved 2009-08-26. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Origin of County Names in Oklahoma". Chronicles of Oklahoma 2 (1): 75–82. March 1924. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  3. ^ "The Constitution of the State of Oklahoma," Article XVII, Section 5. http://oklegal.onenet.net/okcon/XVII-5.html. Accessed on 2007-02-28.
  4. ^ "EPA County FIPS Code Listing". EPA.gov. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  5. ^ a b c National Association of Counties. "NACo - Find a county". Retrieved 2011-09-30. 
  6. ^ a b Oklahoma Historical Society. "Origin of County Names in Oklahoma", Chronicles of Oklahoma 2:1 (March 1924) 75-82 (retrieved August 18, 2006)
  7. ^ "P1 Population Total - All counties within Oklahoma". US Census Bureau. 2010. Retrieved 2011-09-30. 
  8. ^ a b Whitaker, Rachel, "Adair County," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture (accessed June 21, 2010).
  9. ^ "Alfalfa" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  10. ^ "Atoka" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  11. ^ a b c Turner, Kenneth, "No Man's Land," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture (accessed June 21, 2010).
  12. ^ "Beaver" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  13. ^ a b "Beckham" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  14. ^ Wilson, Linda D., "Blaine County," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture (accessed June 21, 2010).
  15. ^ "Blaine" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  16. ^ "Bryan" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  17. ^ "Caddo" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  18. ^ "Canadian" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  19. ^ a b Oklahoma Historical Society. "Origin of County Names in Oklahoma", Chronicles of Oklahoma 2:1 (March 1924) 75-82 (retrieved August 18, 2006).
  20. ^ "Carter" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  21. ^ "Cherokee" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  22. ^ "Choctaw" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  23. ^ "Cimarron" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  24. ^ "Cleveland" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  25. ^ "Coal" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  26. ^ "Comanche" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  27. ^ "Cotton" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  28. ^ "Craig" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  29. ^ "Creek" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  30. ^ "Custer" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  31. ^ "Dewey" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  32. ^ Debo, Angie. "Albert H. Ellis" (PDF). Chronicles of Oklahoma. Retrieved 2013-05-18. 
  33. ^ "Garfield" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  34. ^ "Garvin" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  35. ^ "Grady" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  36. ^ "Grant" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  37. ^ "Greer" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  38. ^ "Harmon" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-04. 
  39. ^ "Harper" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  40. ^ "Haskell" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  41. ^ "Hughes" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  42. ^ "Jackson" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  43. ^ "Jefferson" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  44. ^ "Johnston" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  45. ^ "Kay" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  46. ^ "Kingfisher" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  47. ^ "Kiowa" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  48. ^ "Latimer" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  49. ^ "Le Flore" (PDF). Oklahoma Encyclopedia Online. Oklahoma Department of Libraries. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-02. 
  50. ^ O'Dell, Larry. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Marshall County." Retrieved August 13, 2013.
  51. ^ Carney, Amanda. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Mayes County." Retrieved September 14, 2011.
  52. ^ Coleman, Louis. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "McCurtain County." Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  53. ^ Mullins, Jonita. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Muskogee County." Retrieved April 22, 2013.
  54. ^ Everett, Dianna. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Noble County." Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  55. ^ Cheatham, Gary L. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture: "Nowata County." Retrieved October 1, 2011.
  56. ^ Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Oklahoma County." Accessed September 17. 2009
  57. ^ O'Dell, Larry. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture. "Ottawa County." Retrieved February 16, 2009.
  58. ^ Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Pawnee County" Retrieved February 26,/2011
  59. ^ Newsome, D. Earl. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Payne County." Retrieved March 29, 2012.[1]
  60. ^ O'Dell, Larry. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Pittsburg County." Retrieved September 29, 2013.
  61. ^ Turner, Alvin O. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Pontotoc County." Retrieved September 29, 2013.
  62. ^ Mullins, William H. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Pottawatomie County." Retrieved February 26, 2011
  63. ^ Milligan, James C. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Pushamataha County." Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  64. ^ Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture. "Roger Mills County". Oklahoma Historical Society.
  65. ^ Thomas, Sarah C. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture "Rogers County. Retrieved September 19, 2011."[2]
  66. ^ Mullins, William H. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Seminole County." Retrieved October 1, 2013.
  67. ^ Anderson, William L. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Sequoyah County." Accessed May 23, 2012.
  68. ^ Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Tillman County." Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  69. ^ McMahan, Liz. "Wagoner County - Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture". Oklahoma Historical Society. Retrieved 24 May 2011. 
  70. ^ May, Jon D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Washington County."[3]
  71. ^ O'Dell, Larry. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Washita County."
  72. ^ Reichenberger, Donovan. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Woods County." Retrieved January 1, 2013.[4]
  73. ^ Everett, Dianna. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Woodward County." Accessed September 12, 2013