List of United States Military Academy alumni

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Several West Point cadets tossing their hats in the air at graduation
Traditional hat toss at the 200th anniversary graduation ceremony at the United States Military Academy in June 2002
Logo of the Military Academy

The United States Military Academy (USMA) is an undergraduate college in West Point, New York with the mission of educating and commissioning officers for the United States Army. The Academy was founded in 1802 and is the oldest of the United States' five service academies. It is also called The Academy, The Point, and West Point. The Academy graduated its first cadet, Joseph Gardner Swift, in October 1802. Sports media refer to the Academy as "Army" and the students as "Cadets"; this usage is officially endorsed.[1] The football team is also known as "The Black Knights of the Hudson" and "The Black Knights".[1][2][3] A small number of graduates each year choose the option of entering the United States Air Force, United States Navy, or United States Marine Corps. Before the founding of the United States Air Force Academy in 1955, the Academy was a major source of officers for the Air Force and its predecessors. Most cadets are admitted through the congressional appointment system.[4][5] The curriculum emphasizes the sciences and engineering fields.[6][7]

The list is drawn from graduates, non-graduate former cadets, current cadets, and faculty of the Military Academy. Notable graduates include 2 American Presidents, 4 additional heads of state, 18 astronauts, 74 Medal of Honor recipients,[8] 70 Rhodes Scholars,[9] and 3 Heisman Trophy winners. Among American universities, the academy is fourth on the list of total winners for Rhodes Scholarships, seventh for Marshall Scholarships and fourth on the list of Hertz Fellowships.[10]

Contents

Academicians[edit]

"Class year" refers to the alumni's class year, which usually is the same year they graduated. However, in times of war, classes often graduate early. For example, there were two classes in 1943 - January 1943 and June 1943.
NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Smith, Francis HenneyFrancis Henney Smith1833Major General of Virginia Cadets and Colonel in the Virginia Militia; first and longest serving superintendent of Virginia Military Institute (1839–1889)[11]
Hill, Daniel HarveyDaniel Harvey Hill1842Lieutenant General in Confederate States Army; professor at Washington and Lee University and Davidson College; later the first president of the University of Arkansas (1877–1884)[12]
Lee, George Washington CustisGeorge Washington Custis Lee1854First Lieutenant US Army, Major General CSA; graduated first in his class at the Academy; son of Robert E. Lee, class of 1829; President, Washington and Lee University (1871–1897)a[›][13]
Webb, Alexander S.Alexander S. Webb1855Major General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Gettysburg for personal bravery and leadership repulsing Pickett's Charge; president of the City College of New York (1869–1902)[14][15]
Chaplin, Winfield ScottWinfield Scott Chaplin1870Chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis (1891–1907), Dean of the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard University. Faculty member at Maine State College, Imperial University in Tokyo, and Union College.[16]
Mearsheimer, JohnJohn Mearsheimer1970Served five years as an Air Force officer; political science professor at University of Chicago (1982–present); proponent of offensive realism[17]
Daniel H. Hill
Custis Lee

Superintendents of the United States Military Academy[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Thayer, SylvanusSylvanus Thayer1808Commanded the academy 1817–1833. Known as the "Father of the Military Academy" for his lasting and profound impact. He later had a lasting impact upon Dartmouth College where the Thayer School of Engineering is named after him.[18][19]
Lee, Robert E.Robert E. Lee1829Superintendent 1852–1855. Famous as a cadet for having never received a demerit. He was a rising star in the Army before the Civil War. At the beginning of the war, he swore his allegiance to Virginia and became the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia. After the war, he became president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia.[20]
MacArthur, DouglasDouglas MacArthur1903Commanded the academy 1919–1922 as the academy recovered from the strain of producing officers for the First World War. Implemented sweeping changes that brought the academy into the modern age. Later Chief of Staff of the Army. Awarded the Medal of Honor in 1942 and was the Supreme Allied Commander in the Pacific Theater during World War II. Commanded the Allied Forces during the early years of the Korean War before being relieved by President Truman.[21]
Taylor, Maxwell D.Maxwell D. Taylor1922Superintendent immediately following WWII from 1945–1949, Taylor abolished horse cavalry tactics and made great strides towards modernizing the curriculum, as well as the formalization of the Cadet Honor Code. He was later the Chief of Staff of the Army and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.[22]
Westmoreland, WilliamWilliam Westmoreland1936After graduating as the highest ranking cadet in his class, he served as superintendent 1960–1963 before becoming head of allied forces in the Vietnam War. General Westmoreland was later the Chief of Staff of the Army. He is buried in the West Point Cemetery.[23]
Sylvanus Thayer
Douglas MacArthur

Astronauts[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Borman, FrankFrank Borman1950Commanded Gemini 7 and Apollo 8, first to orbit moon and to see far side of the Moon[24][25]
Aldrin, BuzzBuzz Aldrin1951Pilot of Gemini 12 and Lunar Module Pilot on Apollo 11; 2nd person to walk on the moon[26][27]
White, Edward H.Edward H. White1952Pilot of Gemini 4, died in the Apollo 1 fire; first American to perform a spacewalk[27][28]
Scott, DavidDavid Scott1954Pilot of Gemini 8, Command Module Pilot of Apollo 9, and Commander of Apollo 15, walked on the moon.[27][29]
Mullane, RichardRichard Mullane1967Mission Specialist on STS-41-D, STS-27, and STS-36[27][30]
McArthur, William S.William S. McArthur1973Mission Specialist on STS-58, STS-74, and STS-92; Commanded International Space Station Expedition 12[27][31]
Kimbrough, ShaneShane Kimbrough1989Mission Specialist with Space Shuttle. Latest astronaut from West Point. Former pilot of Apache helicopters.[27][32]
McClain, AnneAnne McClain2013One of two most recent astronauts selected from West Point. Former pilot of OH-58 Kiowa helicopters.[27][33]
Morgan, AndrewAndrew Morgan2013One of two most recent astronauts selected from West Point. Former pilot of OH-58 Kiowa helicopters.[27][34]
Buzz Aldrin
Ed White

Sportspeople[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Daly, Charles DudleyCharles Dudley Daly1905"Godfather of West Point Football"; early promoter of American football[35]
Blanchard, DocDoc Blanchard1947United States Air Force fighter pilot; combat veteran of Vietnam War; football player known as "Mr. Inside" who won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, and James E. Sullivan Award, all in 1945[36]
Davis, Glenn WoodwardGlenn Woodward Davis1947Football player known as "Mr. Outside" who won the Maxwell Award (1944) and Heisman Trophy (1946)[37]
Dawkins, PetePete Dawkins1959Brigadier General; Heisman Trophy; Maxwell Award winner (1958); Rhodes Scholar; Ph.D. from Princeton University; paratrooper; recipient of two Bronze Stars during the Vietnam War; only cadet in history to simultaneously be Brigade Commander, President of his Class, captain of the football team, and a "Star Man" in the top five percent of his class academically[38]
Allen, AnitaAnita Allen2000Modern pentathlon 2004 Summer Olympics, placed 18th[39]
Melson, BoydBoyd Melson2003boxer, 2004 World Military Boxing Championships, gold medal (69-kg. weight class)[40]
Felix "Doc" Blanchard

Businesspeople[edit]

Engineers[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Gunnison, John WilliamsJohn Williams Gunnison1837Captain; topographical engineer; supervised one of the Pacific Railroad surveys in 1853; Gunnison, Colorado and Gunnison, Utah are named in his honor[41][42]
Warren, Gouverneur K.Gouverneur K. Warren1850Major General; commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg for the defense of Little Round Top, Chief of Engineers of the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War; participated in topographical and railroad explorations of the Mississippi River and trans-Mississippi West[43]
Poe, Orlando MetcalfeOrlando Metcalfe Poe1856Brigadier General; American Civil War; lighthouse, harbor, and river engineer; responsible for much of the early lighthouse construction on the Great Lakes; built the Poe Lock of the Soo Locks in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Poe Reef Light in Lake Huron is named in his honor[44]
Wilson, John MoulderJohn Moulder Wilson1860Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his for actions at the Battle of Malvern Hill though acutely ill; Superintendent of the Academy (1889–1893); Chief of Engineers (1897–1901)[14][45]
Oliver, Lunsford E.Lunsford E. Oliver1913Major General; initiated the research that led to the development of the steel treadway bridge; Commander of 5th Armored Division during World War II[46]
Casey, Hugh JohnHugh John Casey1918Major General; chief engineer of South West Pacific theatre of World War II in World War II; initial designer of The Pentagon[47]
Orlando Metcalfe Poe
Lunsford E. Oliver

Government[edit]

Heads of state[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Davis, JeffersonJefferson Davis1828Mexican–American War veteran; U.S. Representative from Mississippi (1845–1846); U.S. Senator from Mississippi (1847–1851); United States Secretary of War (1853–1857); President of the Confederate States of America (1861–1865)[48]
Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant1843General of the Army of the United States; Mexican–American War; Siege of Vicksburg, Battle of Chattanooga, Siege of Petersburg, accepted Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House; 18th President of the United States (1869–1877)b[›][49]
Eisenhower, Dwight D.Dwight D. Eisenhower1915General of the Army; trained tank crews in Pennsylvania during World War I; World War II; commander of European Theater of Operations and Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (1942–1945); 1st Military Governor of American Occupation Zone in Germany (1945); President of Columbia University (1948–1950, 1952–1953); 1st Supreme Allied Commander Europe (1951–1952); 34th President of the United States (1953–1961)[50]
Somoza Debayle, AnastasioAnastasio Somoza Debayle1946General; Head of the Nicaraguan National Guard (1947–1967); President of Nicaragua (1967–1972; 1974–1979)[51]
Ramos, Fidel V.Fidel V. Ramos1950General; Korean War and Vietnam War veteran; Chief of the Philippine Constabulary (1970–1986); Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (1986–1988); Secretary of National Defense (1988–1991); President of the Philippines (1992–1998)[52]
Figueres, José MaríaJosé María Figueres1979Entered Costa Rican government service after graduating from the Academy; Minister of Foreign Trade (1986–1988); Minister of Agriculture (1988–1990); President of Costa Rica (1994–1998)[53]
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Fidel V. Ramos

Director of the Central Intelligence Agency[edit]

Cabinet members[edit]

Ambassadors[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Lawton, AlexanderAlexander Lawton1839Brigadier General CSA; graduated from Harvard Law School, class of 1842; seriously wounded at the Battle of Antietam in September 1862 and served as the Confederacy's second Quartermaster General for the remainder of the war; became president of the American Bar Association in 1882; served as minister to Austria-Hungary (1887–1889)b[›][54]
Longstreet, JamesJames Longstreet1842Major USA, Lieutenant General CSA; Mexican–American War; excelled in several battles during the American Civil War, including the Second Battle of Bull Run and Battle of Antietam; severely wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness; ambassador to the Ottoman Empire (1897–1904)b[›][55]
Rosecrans, WilliamWilliam Rosecrans1842Major General; commander Army of the Cumberland, Battle of Stones River, Tullahoma Campaign, Battle of Chickamauga; U.S. Minister to Mexico (1868–1969); U.S. Representative from California (1881–1885); Register of the Treasury (1885–1893)b[›][56]
Porter, HoraceHorace Porter1860Brigadier general; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his for actions at the Battle of Chickamauga; Ambassador to France (1897–1905)b[›][57][58]
Taylor, Maxwell DavenportMaxwell Davenport Taylor1922General; instituted the Cadet Honor Code at the Academy; commander of 101st Airborne Division (1944–1945); Chief of Staff of the Army (1955–1959); Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1962–1964); United States Ambassador to South Vietnam (1964–1965)a[›][59]
Horace Porter
Barry McCaffrey

Governors (civil)[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Hébert, Paul OctavePaul Octave Hébert1840Captain USA, Brigadier General in Confederate States Army; Mexican–American War; Governor of Louisiana (1853–1856); served at the Siege of Vicksburg and in Texasb[›][61]
Buckner, Simon BolivarSimon Bolivar Buckner1844Captain USA, Lieutenant General CSA; Mexican–American War; Battle of Fort Donelson, Battle of Perryville, Battle of Chickamauga; Governor of Kentucky (1887–1891)b[›][62]
Maury, Dabney H.Dabney H. Maury1846Lieutenant colonel USA, Major General CSA; son of Naval officer John Minor Maury; Mexican–American War, cavalry officer in Oregon and Texas; Battle of Pea Ridge, Battle of Corinth, Siege of Vicksburg; United States Ambassador to Colombia (1887–1889)b[›][63]
Lee, FitzhughFitzhugh Lee1856Second Lieutenant USA, Major General CSA; American Indian Wars; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Opequon, led the last charge of the Confederates on 9 April 1865 at Farmville, Virginia; Governor of Virginia (1886–1890)b[›][64]
Marmaduke, John S.John S. Marmaduke1857Second Lieutenant US Army, Major General CSA; Utah War; Battle of Shiloh, Battle of Cape Girardeau, Red River Campaign, mortally wounded fellow Confederate general and West Point graduate Lucius M. Walker in a duel; Governor of Missouri (1885–1887)b[›][65]
Henry, Guy VernorGuy Vernor Henry1861Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for actions repulsing an enemy attack at the Battle of Cold Harbor; son Major General Guy Vernor Henry Jr. is an Academy alumnus, Class of 1894; Governor of Puerto Rico (1898–1899)b[›][66][67]
Goethals, George WashingtonGeorge Washington Goethals1880Major General; chief engineer of the Panama Canal; Governor of the Panama Canal Zone (1914–1917)[68]
Schley, Julian LarcombeJulian Larcombe Schley1903Major General; World War I; topographic and civil engineer; Governor of the Panama Canal Zone (1926–1932); Chief of Engineers (1937–1941)[45]
Robert McLane
Simon Bolivar Buckner

Governors (military)[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Ruger, Thomas H.Thomas H. Ruger1854Major General; military engineer and lawyer; veteran of Civil War; military engineer and lawyer; military Governor of Georgia (1868); Superintendent of the Academy (1871–1876)a[›][69]
Merritt, WesleyWesley Merritt1860Major General; veteran of the Civil War and Spanish–American War; first Military Governor of the Philippinesa[›][70]
Ames, AdelbertAdelbert Ames1861Major General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his for continuing a fierce fight though severely wounded in his right thigh at First Battle of Bull Run; Governor of Mississippi (1868–1870) and (1874–1876); United States Senator from Mississippi (1870–1874)b[›][66][71]
Eisenhower, Dwight D.Dwight D. Eisenhower1915General of the Army; trained tank crews in Pennsylvania during World War I; World War II; commander of European Theater of Operations and Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (1942–1945); 1st Military Governor of American Occupation Zone in Germany (1945); President of Columbia University (1948–1950, 1952–1953); 34th President of the United States (1953–1961); 1st Supreme Allied Commander Europe (1951–1952)[50]
Caraway, PaulPaul Caraway1929High Commissioner of the United States Civil Administration of the Ryukyu Islands (1961–1964)[72]
Adelbert Ames

Legislators[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Davis, JeffersonJefferson Davis1828Mexican–American War veteran; U.S. Representative from Mississippi (1845–1846); U.S. Senator from Mississippi (1847–1851); United States Secretary of War (1853–1857); president of the Confederate States of America (1861–1865)[48]
Marshall, HumphreyHumphrey Marshall1832Second Lieutenant USA, Brigadier General CSA; Mexican–American War veteran with Kentucky militia; U.S. Representative from Kentucky (1849–1852), (1855–1859); resigned from the Confederate Army in June 1863; member of Second Confederate Congressb[›][73]
Rosecrans, WilliamWilliam Rosecrans1842Major General; commander Army of the Cumberland, Battle of Stones River, Tullahoma Campaign, Battle of Chickamauga; U.S. Minister to Mexico (1868–1969); U.S. Representative from California (1881–1885); Register of the Treasury (1885–1893)b[›][56]
Maxey, Samuel B.Samuel B. Maxey1846First Lieutenant USA, Major General CSA; Mexican–American War; Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Port Hudson; United States Senator from Texas (1875–1887)b[›][74]
McClellan, George B.George B. McClellan1846Major General; developed the McClellan Saddle; organized the Army of the Potomac after the Union forces were defeated at First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam; son George B. McClellan, Jr. served as United States Representative from New York (1895–1903) and as Mayor of New York City (1904–1909)b[›][75]
Ames, AdelbertAdelbert Ames1861Major General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his for continuing a fierce fight though severely wounded in his right thigh at First Battle of Bull Run; Governor of Mississippi (1868–1870) and (1874–1876); United States Senator from Mississippi (1870–1874)b[›][66][71]
du Pont, Henry A.Henry A. du Pont1861Lieutenant Colonel; recipient of the Medal of Honor for actions repulsing an enemy attack at the Battle of Cedar Creek; United States Senator from Delaware (1906–1917)b[›][66][76]
Henry Slocum
Jack Reed
Geoff Davis

Mayors[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Esteves, Luis R.Luis R. Esteves1915Major General; first Hispanic graduate of the Academy; Pancho Villa Expedition; mayor and judge of Polvo, Mexico; commander of the 23rd Battalion, which was composed of Puerto Ricans and stationed in Panama during World War I; commander of 92nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team during World War II; founder of the Puerto Rico National Guard[79]

Jurists[edit]

Law Enforcement and Intelligence figures[edit]

George Washington Goethals, Class of 1880
Hap Arnold, Class of 1907

Literary figures and actors[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Bourke, John GregoryJohn Gregory Bourke1869Captain at time of retirement, Private at the time of the Medal of Honor action; recipient of the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action at the Battle of Stones River, Tennessee; prolific diarist and author focusing on the Old Westb[›][66][80]

Military figures[edit]

Medal of Honor recipients[edit]

Civil War[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Robinson, John ClevelandJohn Cleveland Robinson1839 exLeft the Academy after three years but joined the Army one year later; Major General in the American Civil War; awarded the MOH for valor in action in 1864 near Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia; Lieutenant Governor of New York (1873–1874); served two terms as the president of the Grand Army of the Republicb[›][14][81]
Hatch, John PorterJohn Porter Hatch1845Major General; fought in the Mexican War where he was breveted twice for bravery in battle; awarded the MOH for bravery at the Battle of South Mountain during the Maryland Campaign where he was wounded and had two mounts shot from underneath him; later served on the western frontier; retired to New York City and was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1893b[›][66][82]
Willcox, Orlando B.Orlando B. Willcox1847Major General; awarded the MOH in 1895 for gallantry at the First Battle of Bull Run where he was captured; later released as part of a prisoner exchange and served in the Virginia and North Carolina theaters at the end of the warb[›][14][83]
Baird, AbsalomAbsalom Baird1849Major General; attended Washington & Jefferson College before graduating from West Point; earned fame for actions at the Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Jonesborough; received the MOH in 1896 for his actions at Jonesborough; later received the French Légion d'honneurb[›][66][84]
Saxton, RufusRufus Saxton1849Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for his defense at the Battle of Harpers Ferry; participated in the Pacific Railroad surveys in 1853; early abolitionistb[›][14][85]
Carr, Eugene AsaEugene Asa Carr1850Major General; recipient of the MOH for his defensive though wounded several times at the Battle of Pea Ridgeb[›][66][70]
Tompkins, Charles HenryCharles Henry Tompkins1851 exDropped out of the Academy after two years for unspecified reasons; Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for twice charging through the enemy's lines on 1 July 1861 near Fairfax, Virginia, making him the first Union officer of the Civil War to receive the Medal of Honorb[›][14][86]
Stanley, David S.David S. Stanley1852Major General; recipient of the MOH for his actions organizing a counterattack at the Second Battle of Franklin, commander of the IV Corpsb[›][14][85]
Schofield, JohnJohn Schofield1853Lieutenant General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions leading an attack at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, Atlanta Campaign, Battle of Franklin, Battle of Nashville, Battle of Wyse Fork; commander of the Army of the Frontier, division commander in the XIV Corps; United States Secretary of War (1868–1869); Superintendent of the Academy (1876–1881); Commanding General of the United States Army (1888–1895); Military Governor of Virginiab[›][14][70]
Greene, Oliver DuffOliver Duff Greene1853Major; recipient of the MOH for his actions at the Battle of Antietamb[›][66][87]
Bliss, ZenasZenas Bliss1854Major General; recipient of the MOH for his actions at the Battle of Fredericksburg; formed the first unit of Seminole-Negro Indian Scoutsb[›][66][88]
Howard, Oliver OtisOliver Otis Howard1854Major General; recipient of the MOH for his actions leading an attack at the Battle of Seven Pines despite wound which resulted in the loss of his right arm; led the campaign against Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce tribe; founder of Howard University; Superintendent of the Academy (1881–1882)b[›][66][89]
Webb, Alexander S.Alexander S. Webb1855Major General; recipient of the MOH for his actions at the Battle of Gettysburg for personal bravery and leadership repulsing Pickett's Charge; president of the City College of New York (1869–1902)b[›][14][15]
Arnold, AbrahamAbraham Arnold1859Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for leading a cavalry charge against superior forcesb[›][66][90]
Porter, HoraceHorace Porter1860Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for his actions at the Battle of Chickamauga; United States Ambassador to France (1897–1905)b[›][14][58]
Wilson, John MoulderJohn Moulder Wilson1860Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for his actions at the Battle of Malvern Hill despite acute illness; Superintendent of the Academy (1889–1893); Chief of Engineers (1897–1901)b[›][14][91]
Ames, AdelbertAdelbert Ames1861Major General; recipient of the MOH for his for continuing a fierce fight though severely wounded in his right thigh at First Battle of Bull Run; Governor of Mississippi (1868–1870) and (1874–1876); United States Senator from Mississippi (1870–1874)b[›][66][71]
Beaumont, Eugene B.Eugene B. Beaumont1861Lieutenant Colonel; recipient of the MOH for two separate actions at the Harpeth River in Tennessee and the Battle of Selma in Alabamab[›][66][92]
Benjamin, Samuel NichollSamuel Nicholl Benjamin1861Major; recipient of the MOH for actions as an artillery officerb[›][66][93]
du Pont, Henry A.Henry A. du Pont1861Lieutenant Colonel; recipient of the MOH for actions repulsing an enemy attack at the Battle of Cedar Creek; United States Senator from Delaware (1906–1917)b[›][66][76]
Henry, Guy VernorGuy Vernor Henry1861Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for actions repulsing an enemy attack at the Battle of Cold Harbor; son Major General Guy Vernor Henry Jr. is an Academy alumnus, class of 1894; Governor of Puerto Rico (1898–1899)b[›][66][67]
Gillespie, Jr., George LewisGeorge Lewis Gillespie, Jr.1862Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for carrying dispatches under withering fire at the Battle of Cold Harbor; Chief of Engineers (1901–1904)b[›][66][91]
Beebe, William SullyWilliam Sully Beebe1863Major; recipient of the MOH for actions during an assault on a fortified positionb[›][66][94]
Benyaurd, William Henry HarrisonWilliam Henry Harrison Benyaurd1863Lieutenant Colonel; recipient of the MOH for actions during reconnaissance and rallying his troopsb[›][66][95]
Bourke, John GregoryJohn Gregory Bourke1869Captain at time of retirement, Private at the time of the Medal of Honor action; recipient of the MOH for gallantry in action at the Battle of Stones River, Tennessee; prolific diarist and author focusing on the Old Westb[›][66][80]
Absalom Baird
Charles Henry Tompkins
Oliver Howard
Alexander Webb
Adelbert Ames
John Bourke

Indian Wars[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Godfrey, Edward SettleEdward Settle Godfrey1867Brigadier General; a Private during the Civil War before attending West Point; received the MOH for leading his men against Chief Joseph despite being severely wounded; led two platoons of Medal of Honor men at the burial of the Unknown Soldier from World War Ib[›][96][97]
Hall, William PrebleWilliam Preble Hall1868Brigadier General; received the MOH for leading a small group to rescue an officer surrounded by 35 enemy; distinguished marksman with rifle and revolverb[›][96][98]
Carter, Robert GoldthwaiteRobert Goldthwaite Carter1870First Lieutenant; an enlisted soldier during the Civil War before attending West Point; received the MOH for repulsing the charge of a large hostile Indian force near the Brazos River in 1871b[›][96][99]
Kerr, John BrownJohn Brown Kerr1870Brigadier General; received the MOH for actions against Brule Sioux along the White River, South Dakotab[›][96][100]
McClernand, Edward JohnEdward John McClernand1870Brigadier General; received the MOH for actions at Bear Paw Mountain, Montana in 1877 against Chief Joseph's tribeb[›][96][101]
Varnum, CharlesCharles Varnum1872Colonel; commander of the scouts for George Armstrong Custer in the Little Bighorn Campaign during the Black Hills War; recipient of the MOH for his actions in a conflict following the Battle of Wounded Kneeb[›][96][102]
West, FrankFrank West1872Colonel; recipient of the MOH for rallying his men against a fortified position at the Battle of Big Dry Wash, Arizona, for which three other men also received the Medal of Honor: Thomas Cruse, George H. Morgan, and Charles Taylorb[›][96][103]
Carter, William HardingWilliam Harding Carter1873Major General; recipient of the MOH for rescuing two soldiers under heavy fire during the Comanche Campaignb[›][96][104]
Maus, Marion PerryMarion Perry Maus1874Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for actions while commander of Apache scouts in the capture of Geronimob[›][96][105]
Garlington, Ernest AlbertErnest Albert Garlington1876Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for gallantry at the Battle of Wounded Kneeb[›][96][106]
Gresham, John ChowningJohn Chowning Gresham1876Colonel; recipient of the MOH for gallantry at the Battle of Wounded Kneeb[›][96][107]
Long, Oscar FitzalanOscar Fitzalan Long1876Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for leadership under heavy fire at Bear Paw Mountain, Montanab[›][96][108]
Day, Matthias W.Matthias W. Day1877Colonel; recipient of the MOH for rescuing a wounded soldier under heavy fire after being ordered to retreat; member of the 9th Cavalry Regiment of the Buffalo Soldiersb[›][96][109]
Emmet, Robert TempleRobert Temple Emmet1877Colonel; recipient of the MOH for holding off 200 enemies with only himself and five men despite being surrounded; member of the 9th Cavalry Regiment of the Buffalo Soldiersb[›][96][110]
Wilder, Wilber ElliottWilber Elliott Wilder1877Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for rescuing a wounded soldier under heavy fire; key figure in negotiating the surrender of the Apache chief Geronimob[›][96][111]
Brett, Lloyd MiltonLloyd Milton Brett1879Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for fearless exposure in cutting off the enemy's pony herd at O'Fallon's Creek, Montana, which greatly crippled their ability to fightb[›][96][112]
Cruse, ThomasThomas Cruse1879Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for holding off the enemy, which enabled the rescue of wounded soldier at the Battle of Big Dry Wash, Arizona, for which three other men also received the Medal of Honor: Frank West, George H. Morgan, and Charles Taylorb[›][96][113]
Burnett, George RitterGeorge Ritter Burnett1880First Lieutenant; recipient of the MOH for rescuing stranded men under heavy enemy fire; one of his men, Augustus Walley, also received the Medal of Honor for this action, both members of the 9th Cavalry Regiment of the Buffalo Soldiersa[›]b[›][96]
Morgan, George HoraceGeorge Horace Morgan1880Colonel; recipient of the MOH for steadfastly holding his line against the enemy at the Battle of Big Dry Wash, Arizona, for which three other men also received the Medal of Honor: Thomas Cruse, Frank West, and Charles Taylorb[›][96][114]
Clarke, Powhatan HenryPowhatan Henry Clarke1884First Lieutenant; recipient of the MOH for saving a wounded man under heavy fire; later drowned while rescuing another manb[›][96][115]
Howze, Robert LeeRobert Lee Howze1888Major General; recipient of the MOH for bravery in action; once threatened to dismiss an entire class of plebes (freshmen) from the Academy for hazing; presided over the court-martial of Brigadier General Billy Mitchellb[›][96][116]
William Carter
Oscar Long
Matthias Day
Powhatan Clarke wearing his Medal of Honor
Robert Howze

Spanish–American War[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Mills, Albert LeopoldAlbert Leopold Mills1879Major General; recipient of the MOH for continuing to lead his men at the Battle of San Juan Hill despite being shot in the head and temporarily blinded; Superintendent of the Academy (1898–1906)b[›][117][118]
Heard, John WilliamJohn William Heard1883Major General; recipient of the MOH for repulsing an attack by a larger force while his unit was unloading supplies from a river boatb[›][117][119]
Roberts, Charles DuValCharles DuVal Roberts1897Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for assisting a wounded man under heavy fireb[›][117][120]
Welborn, Ira ClintonIra Clinton Welborn1898Colonel; recipient of the MOH for assisting a wounded man under heavy fireb[›][117][121]
Albert Mills

Philippine–American War[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Birkhimer, William EdwardWilliam Edward Birkhimer1870Brigadier General; awarded the MOH for taking control of a bridge by charging and routing 300 of the enemy with 12 menb[›][122][123]
Parker, JamesJames Parker1876Major General; awarded the MOH for leadership of his men by repulsing a nighttime attack by a much larger enemy forceb[›][122]
Bell, James FranklinJames Franklin Bell1878Major General; began his career with the 9th Cavalry Regiment, a black unit; awarded the MOH for attacking seven enemy soldiers aloneb[›][122]
Logan, Jr., John A.John A. Logan, Jr.1887 exMajor; awarded the MOH for actions while leading his small unit in an attack against a much larger enemy forceb[›][122][124]
McGrath, Hugh J.Hugh J. McGrath1880Captain; awarded the MOH for actions against the enemy at a caveb[›][122]
Sage, William HampdenWilliam Hampden Sage1882Captain; awarded the MOH for swimming the San Juan River in the face of the enemy's fire and drove him from his entrenchmentb[›][122]
Van Schaick, Louis JosephLouis Joseph Van Schaick1900 exColonel; awarded the MOH for cavalry actions against hostile forces in a canyonb[›][122]
Wilson, Arthur HarrisonArthur Harrison Wilson1904Colonel; awarded the MOH for actions against hostile Morosb[›][122]
Kennedy, John ThomasJohn Thomas Kennedy1908Brigadier General; awarded the MOH for actions against the enemy at a caveb[›][122]
James Franklin Bell

Boxer Rebellion[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Lawton, Louis BowemLouis Bowem Lawton1893Major; recipient of the MOH for actions in combat despite being wounded three timesb[›][125]
Titus, Calvin PearlCalvin Pearl Titus1905Lieutenant Colonel at time of retirement, Corporal at the time of the Medal of Honor action; admitted to the Academy because of his Medal of Honor during the Boxer Rebellion; became a Chaplain's assistantb[›][125][126]

Mexican Campaign (Vera Cruz)[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Fryer, Eli ThompsonEli Thompson Fryer1901 exBrigadier General; recipient of the MOH for actions as a Marine company commander during the occupation of Vera Cruzb[›][127][128]
Eli T. Fryer

World War I[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Pike, Emory JenisonEmory Jenison Pike1901Lieutenant Colonel; recipient of the MOH for actions in combat organizing and leading units during heavy shelling despite being mortally woundedb[›][129][130]

World War II[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
MacArthur, DouglasDouglas MacArthur1903General of the Army, Field Marshal in the Philippine Army; United States occupation of Veracruz; Second Battle of the Marne, Battle of Saint-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne Offensive during World War I; commander of the 42nd Infantry Division; Superintendent of the United States Military Academy (1919–1922); brigade commander in the Philippine Division; commander of the Philippine Department; Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1930–1935); recipient of the Medal of Honor for actions during the Battle of Bataan, commander of the South West Pacific Area during World War II; Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers during the Occupation of Japan; Korean War; grandson of Wisconsin Governor Arthur MacArthur, Sr.; son of Lieutenant General and Medal of Honor recipient Arthur MacArthur, Jr.b[›][131][132]
Wainwright IV, Jonathan MayhewJonathan Mayhew Wainwright IV1906General; recipient of the MOH for defense of te Bataan and Corregidor; also noted for leadership while a prisoner of war (POW); present onboard USS Missouri (BB-63) for the surrender of Japan; returned to the Philippines to accept surrender of the local Japanese commander; his father, Robert Powell Page Wainwright, was member of the Academy Class of 1875b[›][133][134]
Wilbur, William H.William H. Wilbur1912Brigadier General; recipient of the MOH for actions during the Allied landings in North Africa while attempting to negotiate a cease fire and leading combat actions against hostile forcesb[›][133][135]
Craw, Demas T.Demas T. Craw1924Colonel, United States Army Air Forces; posthumous recipient of the MOH for ground actions during the Allied landings in North Africa while attempting to negotiate a cease fireb[›][136][137]
Johnson, Leon WilliamLeon William Johnson1926General, United States Army Air Corps and United States Air Force; recipient of the MOH for actions in aerial combat during the raid on the Ploesti, Romania oilfieldsb[›][138][139]
Castle, Frederick WalkerFrederick Walker Castle1930Brigadier General, United States Army Air Forces; posthumous recipient of the MOH for actions in aerial combat while leading a bombing mission over Belgiumb[›][136][140]
Cole, Robert G.Robert G. Cole1939Lieutenant Colonel; 502nd Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division; recipient of the MOH for leading his battalion in a bayonet charge at Carentan, France during the Battle of Normandy; later killed in Best, Netherlandsb[›][136][141]
Vance, Jr., Leon RobertLeon Robert Vance, Jr.1939Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army Air Corps; recipient of the MOH for actions in saving his bomber crew though he was severely wounded; Vance Air Force Base in his hometown of Enid, Oklahoma is named in his honorb[›][133][142]
Nininger, Alexander R.Alexander R. Nininger1941Second Lieutenant; recipient of the MOH for actions in Bataan, Philippines while a member of the Philippine Scouts, continued an attack even though wounded three times; first Army soldier awarded the Medal of Honor in World War II; First Division of Cadet Barracks at West Point is named in his honorb[›][131]
Daly, Michael J.Michael J. Daly1945 exCaptain; dropped out of the Academy after one year to enlist so he could fight in World War II; received a battlefield commission; awarded the MOH for assaulting several enemy positionsb[›][35][136]
Two Medal of Honor recipients and friends, MacArthur (l) and Wainwright (r), greet at the end of the war. Wainwright was just released from POW camp
Leon Johnson, at his Medal of Honor ceremony with the medal around his neck

Korea[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Coursen, Samuel S.Samuel S. Coursen1949First Lieutenant; recipient of the MOH for actions while helping rescue a wounded man and eliminating an enemy roadblockb[›][143]
Shea, Jr., Richard ThomasRichard Thomas Shea, Jr.1952First Lieutenant; recipient of the MOH for actions while leading a counterattack against a larger enemy forceb[›][143]

Vietnam[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Jones, III, William AtkinsonWilliam Atkinson Jones, III1945Colonel, United States Air Force; recipient of the MOH for actions while helping rescue a downed pilotb[›][144][145]
Lucas, AndreAndre Lucas1954Lieutenant Colonel; recipient of the MOH for repulsing a much larger force over a 23-day periodb[›][144][146]
Donlon, RogerRoger Donlon1959 exDropped out of the Academy for personal reasons; Captain, later Colonel; recipient of the MOH for repulsing a much larger forceb[›][144][147]
Versace, Humbert RoqueHumbert Roque Versace1959Captain; recipient of the MOH for his resistance to Viet Cong indoctrination efforts while a prisoner of war (POW); his struggle was chronicled in length by fellow POW Nick Rowe in the book Five Years to Freedom.b[›][148][149]
Gardner, James A.James A. Gardner1965 exDid not graduate; First Lieutenant; recipient of the MOH for actions leading his platoon in the relief of a company that was engaged with a larger enemy forceb[›][144]
Reasoner, Frank S.Frank S. Reasoner1962First Lieutenant, United States Marine Corps; recipient of the MOH for actions leading reconnaissance patrol against a larger force and trying to save a wounded manb[›][148][150]
Foley, Robert F.Robert F. Foley1963Captain, later Lieutenant General; recipient of the MOH for actions on 11 November 1966 for rallying his unit in the face of superior enemy numbers and personally destroying three enemy strongpoints; West Point Commandant of Cadets (1996–1998); later president of Marion Military Institute; currently the director of the Army Emergency Relief Programb[›][144]
Bucha, Paul WilliamPaul William Bucha1965Captain; recipient of the MOH for actions leading his unit against a larger enemy for in Bình Dương Province, Vietnam; foreign policy adviser to Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaignb[›][144][151]
Roger Donlon
Humbert Versace

Mexican-American War combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Totten, Joseph GilbertJoseph Gilbert Totten1805Major General; War of 1812, Mexican–American War, American Civil War; military and lighthouse engineer; Chief of Engineers (1838–1864)[45]
Ringgold, SamuelSamuel Ringgold1818Major; Mexican–American War veteran; developed several artillery innovations; first U.S. officer to fall in the Mexican-American War, perishing from wounds inflicted during the Battle of Palo Alto[152]
Mansfield, Joseph K.Joseph K. Mansfield1822Major General; Mexican–American War and American Civil War; civil engineer; mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam[153]
Davis, JeffersonJefferson Davis1828Mexican–American War veteran; U.S. Representative from Mississippi (1845–1846); U.S. Senator from Mississippi (1847–1851); United States Secretary of War (1853–1857); president of the Confederate States of America (1861–1865)[48]
Magruder, John B.John B. Magruder1830Major USA, Major General CSA, Major General in Imperial Mexican Army; Second Seminole War and Mexican–American War veteran; noted for deceptive delaying tactics[154]
Hamilton, Charles SmithCharles Smith Hamilton1843Major General; Mexican-American War and American Civil War veteran; wounded in the Battle of Molino del Rey; division commander during the Battle of Yorktown[155]
Samuel Ringgold

American Civil War combatants[edit]

Confederate States Army generals[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Cooper, SamuelSamuel Cooper1815Colonel USA, Adjutant General, 1852-1861; Adjutant and Inspector General General in the Confederate Army, 1861-1865, Highest-ranking General, CSA[156]
Johnston, Albert SidneyAlbert Sidney Johnston1826Colonel USA, General in the Republic of Texas, General in the Confederate States Army; graduated eighth in his class, commander of US forces in the Utah War, killed at the Battle of Shiloh
Lee, Robert E.Robert E. Lee1829Colonel USA, General CSA; graduated second in his class without demerits; father of George Washington Custis Lee, class of 1854; Commander, Army of Northern Virginia (1862–1865); General-in-Chief, Confederate States Army (1865); President, Washington and Lee University (1865–1870)a[›]b[›][157]
Magruder, John B.John B. Magruder1830Major in United States Army, Major General in Confederate States Army, Major General in Imperial Mexican Army;Second Seminole War and Mexican–American War veteranb[›][154]
Longstreet, JamesJames Longstreet1842Major in United States Army, Lieutenant General in Confederate States Army;Mexican–American War; excelled in several battles during the American Civil War, including the Second Battle of Bull Run and Battle of Antietam; severely wounded at the Battle of the Wildernessb[›][55]
Jackson, StonewallStonewall Jackson1846Major in United States Army, Lieutenant General in Confederate States Army; Mexican–American War; professor of natural and experimental philosophy and artillery at Virginia Military Institute (1851–1861); excelled in several battles during the American Civil War, including the First Battle of Bull Run where he received his nickname; accidentally shot by his own troops at the Battle of Chancellorsville and died of complications eight days laterb[›][158]
Pickett, GeorgeGeorge Pickett1846Captain USA, Major General in the Confederate States Army; graduated last in his class, leader of Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg
Hood, John BellJohn Bell Hood1853Second Lieutenant USA, General CSA; offered a post as instructor at the Academy, but declined due to the impending war; brilliant commander in the field but less effective as a general
Stuart, J.E.B.J.E.B. Stuart1854Captain in United States Army, Major General in Confederate States Army; American Indian Wars; excelled in several battles during the American Civil War, including the Peninsula Campaign and Maryland Campaignb[›][159]
Robert E. Lee
Stonewall Jackson
John Bell Hood

Union Army generals[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Mansfield, Joseph K.Joseph K. Mansfield1822Major General; Mexican–American War; civil engineer; mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam; Fort Mansfield, a coastal artillery installation in Westerly, Rhode Island named in his honorb[›][153]
Meade, GeorgeGeorge Meade1835Major General; civil and lighthouse engineer; Second Seminole War, Mexican-American War; Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Appomattox Campaign, defeated Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg, commander Army of the Potomac (1863–1865); Fort George G. Meade in Maryland, home of the National Security Agency named in his honorb[›][160]
Sherman, William TecumsehWilliam Tecumseh Sherman1840Major General; treated the demerit system at West Point with disdain, which lowered his class standing from fourth to sixth; Battle of Shiloh, Vicksburg Campaign, Chattanooga Campaign, Atlanta Campaign, Carolinas Campaign, led the brutal Savannah Campaign (March to the Sea) from Atlanta to Savannah that demoralized the South; Commanding General of the United States Army (1869–1883)b[›][161]
Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant1843General of the Army of the United States; Mexican–American War; Siege of Vicksburg, Battle of Chattanooga, Siege of Petersburg, accepted Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House; 18th President of the United States (1869–1877)b[›][49]
Hancock, Winfield ScottWinfield Scott Hancock1844Major General; Mexican-American War; Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, led the Army of the Potomac; Democratic Party nominee for President (1880)b[›][162]
McClellan, George B.George B. McClellan1846Major General; developed the McClellan Saddle; organized the Army of the Potomac after the Union forces were defeated at First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam; son George B. McClellan, Jr. served as United States Representative from New York (1895–1903) and as Mayor of New York City (1904–1909)b[›][75]
Sheridan, PhilipPhilip Sheridan1853General; Battle of Chattanooga, Overland Campaign, Valley Campaigns of 1864, used scorched earth tactics in the Shenandoah Valley and forced Lee's surrender in the Appomattox Campaign; American Indian Warsb[›][163]
Custer, George ArmstrongGeorge Armstrong Custer1861Major General; Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, leader of a charge at the Battle of Gettysburg that broke the back of the Confederate resistance; Battle of the Wilderness, Siege of Petersburg; Battle of the Washita, died at Battle of the Little Bighornb[›][164]
Man with light beard and facing left in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons
William Tecumseh Sherman (1840)
Man with light beard sitting down in suit with vest and bow tie
Ulysses S. Grant (1843)
Man with moustache sitting down with arm on table in uniform with two columns of buttons
Philip Sheridan (1853)

Indian Wars combatants & Buffalo Soldiers[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Liggett, HunterHunter Liggett1879Lieutenant General; Indian Wars; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; in 1914 predicted that an invasion of the Philippines would occur through the Lingayen Gulf, which occurred twice in World War II; division and corps commander in World War I[165]
Henry Ossian Flipper, Class of 1877, first African American graduate

Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Bliss, Tasker H.Tasker H. Bliss1875General; Spanish-American War; division commander in Philippine–American War; Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1917–1918); American representative Supreme War Council[88]
Liggett, HunterHunter Liggett1879Lieutenant General; Indian Wars; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; in 1914 predicted that an invasion of the Philippines would occur through the Lingayen Gulf, which occurred twice in World War II; division and corps commander in World War I[165]
Pershing, John J.John J. Pershing1886General of the Armies; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; Moro Rebellion; commander of 8th Regiment in the Pancho Villa Expedition; led the American Expeditionary Force in World War I[166]
Hines, John L.John L. Hines1891Major General; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; Pancho Villa Expedition; brigade and division commander in World War I; Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1924–1926)[167]

Pancho Villa Expedition combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Swift, EbenEben Swift1876Major General; Spanish-American War, World War I; Director of the United States Army War College; commander of Camp Gordon; commander of the 82nd Division; commander of U.S. Forces in Italy; father of Major General Innis P. Swift; father-in-law of Brigadier General Evan Harris Humphrey; son-in-law of Brigadier General Innis N. Palmer; Camp Swift, Texas is named for him[168]
Pershing, John J.John J. Pershing1886General of the Armies; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; Moro Rebellion; commander of 8th Regiment in the Pancho Villa Expedition; led the American Expeditionary Force in World War I[166]
Hines, John L.John L. Hines1891Major General; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; Pancho Villa Expedition; brigade and division commander in World War I; Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1924–1926)[167]
Johnson, Hugh S.Hugh S. Johnson1903Brigadier General; lawyer in Judge Advocate General's Corps; instrumental in implementing the Selective Service Act of 1917; Deputy Provost Marshal General (1971–1918); Director of the Purchase and Supply Branch of the General Staff (1918); commander of 15th Infantry Brigade; Director of the National Recovery Administration; named Time Person of the Year in 1933[169]
Patton, George S.George S. Patton1909General; 1912 Summer Olympics, modern pentathlon, 5th place; Pancho Villa Expedition; World War II; Battle of Saint-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne Offensive; commander of the 1st Tank Brigade/304th Tank Brigade; commander of the 3rd Cavalry Regiment; commander of the 2nd Armored Division; commander of the II Corps; commander of the Seventh United States Army, Third United States Army, and Fifteenth United States Army during World War II; descendant of Brigadier General Hugh Mercer; father of Major General George Patton IV; Patton series of tanks were named for him[170][171]
Spaatz, Carl AndrewCarl Andrew Spaatz1914General; Pancho Villa Expedition; flight instructor and fighter pilot in World War I; Eighth Air Force commander in World War II; first Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force (1947–1948)[172]
Esteves, Luis R.Luis R. Esteves1915Major General; first Hispanic graduate of the Academy; Pancho Villa Expedition; mayor and judge of Polvo, Mexico; commander of the 23rd Battalion, which was composed of Puerto Ricans and stationed in Panama during World War I; commander of 92nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team during World War II; founder of the Puerto Rico National Guard[79]
Johns, DwightDwight Johns1916Brigadier General; World War I, Pancho Villa Expedition, World War II; recipients of the Army Distinguished Service Medal[173]

World War I combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Bliss, Tasker H.Tasker H. Bliss1875General; Spanish-American War; division commander in Philippine–American War; Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1917–1918); American representative Supreme War Council[88]
Liggett, HunterHunter Liggett1879Lieutenant General; Indian Wars; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; in 1914 predicted that an invasion of the Philippines would occur through the Lingayen Gulf, which occurred twice in World War II; division and corps commander in World War I[165]
Pershing, John J.John J. Pershing1886General of the Armies; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; Moro Rebellion; commander of 8th Regiment in the Pancho Villa Expedition; led the American Expeditionary Force in World War I[166]
Hines, John L.John L. Hines1891Major General; Spanish-American War; Philippine–American War; Pancho Villa Expedition; brigade and division commander in World War I; Chief of Staff of the United States Army (1924–1926)[167]
Esteves, Luis R.Luis R. Esteves1915Major General; first Hispanic graduate of the Academy; Pancho Villa Expedition; mayor and judge of Polvo, Mexico; commander of the 23rd Battalion, which was composed of Puerto Ricans and stationed in Panama during World War I; commander of 92nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team during World War II; founder of the Puerto Rico National Guard[79]
Man facing forward in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons with medals
John Pershing (1886)
Man facing forward in high neck uniform with ribbon bars on
John Hines (1891)
Cadet Luis R. Esteves (1915)

World War II combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Arnold, Henry H. "Hap"Henry H. "Hap" Arnold1907General of the Army, General of the Air Force; Second rated pilot in the United States Army Air Corps; executive officer of the aviation section at Army headquarters in Washington D.C. during World War I; World War II; commander of the United States Army Command and General Staff College; commander of March Field; commander of the United States Army Air Forces; founder of the RAND Corporation; Arnold Air Force Base, Arnold Engineering Development Center, and Arnold Air Society are named for him[90]
Patton, George S.George S. Patton1909General; 1912 Summer Olympics, modern pentathlon, 5th place; Pancho Villa Expedition; World War II; Battle of Saint-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne Offensive; commander of the 1st Tank Brigade/304th Tank Brigade; commander of the 3rd Cavalry Regiment; commander of the 2nd Armored Division; commander of the II Corps; commander of the Seventh United States Army, Third United States Army, and Fifteenth United States Army during World War II; descendant of Brigadier General Hugh Mercer; great-grandson of U.S. Representative John M. Patton; relative of Confederate States Brigadier General Hugh W. Mercer; grandson of California State Senator Benjamin Davis Wilson; father of Major General George Patton IV; father-in-law of General John K. Waters; cousin of U.S. Representative Larry McDonald; Patton Army Air Field is named for him; the Patton series of tanks were named for him; the General George Patton Museum at Fort Knox is named for him[170][171]
Spaatz, Carl AndrewCarl Andrew Spaatz1914General; Pancho Villa Expedition; flight instructor and fighter pilot in World War I; Eighth Air Force commander in World War II; first Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force (1947–1948)[172]
Eisenhower, Dwight D.Dwight D. Eisenhower1915General of the Army; World War II; commander of European Theater of Operations and Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (1942–1945); 1st Military Governor of American Occupation Zone in Germany (1945); President of Columbia University (1948–1950, 1952–1953); 1st Supreme Allied Commander Europe (1951–1952); 34th President of the United States (1953–1961)[50]
Esteves, Luis R.Luis R. Esteves1915Major General; first Hispanic graduate of the Academy; Pancho Villa Expedition; mayor and judge of Polvo, Mexico; commander of the 23rd Battalion, which was composed of Puerto Ricans and stationed in Panama during World War I; commander of 92nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team during World War II; founder of the Puerto Rico National Guard[79]
Casey, Hugh JohnHugh John Casey1918Major General; instructor and engineer company commander during World War I; Chief Engineer for General of the Army Douglas MacArthur for the South West Pacific theatre of World War II; initial designer of The Pentagon; father of Major Hugh Boyd Casey; father-in-law of Major General Frank Butner Clay[174]
Douglas MacArthur
George S. Patton
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Omar Bradley

Korean War combatants[edit]

Fidel V. Ramos

Vietnam War combatants[edit]

Gulf War combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Schwarzkopf, Jr., NormanNorman Schwarzkopf, Jr.1956General; Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Central Command; father Norman Schwarzkopf, Sr. is an 1917 Academy alumnus[175]
Franks, Jr., Frederick M.Frederick M. Franks, Jr.1959General; commander, VII Corps and the "Left Hook" maneuver against fourteen Iraqi divisions[176]
McCaffrey, BarryBarry McCaffrey1964General; commander of 24th Infantry Division[177]
Meigs, MontgomeryMontgomery Meigs1967General; Vietnam War, Gulf War, and Operation Joint Endeavor; commander 3rd Infantry Division (1995–1996); commander NATO SFOR (1998–1999); professor of strategy and military operations; Major General Montgomery C. Meigs, Class of 1836, is his ancestor[178]
McMaster, H. R.H. R. McMaster1984Major General; Captain in 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of 73 Easting; military history professor at West Point (1994–1996); Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with a thesis criticizing American strategy in the Vietnam War and detailed in his 1998 book Dereliction of Duty; commander of 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment in the Iraq War[179]
Norman Schwarzkopf Jr.

War on Terror[edit]

Participants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Downing, Wayne A.Wayne A. Downing1962National Director and Deputy National Security Adviser for combating terrorism; chairman of the Combating Terrorism Center at the Academy[180]
McChrystal, Stanley A.Stanley A. McChrystal1976Lieutenant General; special operations and intelligence officer; served in Iraq and Afghanistan; commander, Joint Special Operations Command (2003–2008)[181]

Afghanistan combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Hagenbeck, Franklin L.Franklin L. Hagenbeck1971Lieutenant General; Commander, Coalition Joint Task Force Mountain, Operations Enduring Freedom/Anaconda and Deputy Commanding General, Combined Joint Task Force 180 in Afghanistan; Superintendent of the Academy (2006–2010)[182]
Cone, Robert W.Robert W. Cone1979Major General; Commander, Combined Security Transition Command - Afghanistan[183]

Iraq combatants[edit]

NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Abizaid, JohnJohn Abizaid1973General; commander, United States Central Command; commander 3rd Battalion, 325th Airborne Battalion Combat Team; commander 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment[184]
Petraeus, DavidDavid Petraeus1974General; first commander of the Multi-National Security Transition Command - Iraq and the NATO Training Mission-Iraq; commander 101st Airborne Division; commander Multi-National Forces - Iraq (2007-)[185]
Caldwell, William B.William B. Caldwell1976Lieutenant General; Deputy Chief of Staff for Strategic Effects and spokesman for Multinational Force Iraq[186]
Kimmitt, MarkMark Kimmitt1976Brigadier General; chief military spokesman for the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad (2003–2004); Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs (2008–2009)[187]
Coffman, Jr., James H.James H. Coffman, Jr.1978Colonel; Distinguished Service Cross for action at Mosul, Iraq[188]
McMaster, H. R.H. R. McMaster1984Major General[179]
Perez, EmilyEmily Perez2005Second Lieutenant; first member of the "Class of 9/11" to be killed in combat[189]
David Petraeus
H. R. McMaster

Supreme Allied Commanders of NATO[edit]

Alexander Haig, Class of 1947

Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff[edit]

Army Chiefs of Staff/Commanders of the Army[edit]

William Westmoreland, Class of 1936

Air Force Chiefs of Staff[edit]

Carl Spaatz, Class of 1914

Chief of Staff of Non-American Armed Forces[edit]

Presidential and Congressional awardees[edit]

Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients[edit]

Wesley Clark, Class of 1966.

Congressional Gold Medal recipients[edit]

Congressional Space Medal of Honor recipients[edit]

Scientists, Inventors, and Physicians[edit]

Television and movie figures[edit]

Ambrose Burnside, Class of 1847

Eponyms[edit]

Graduates depicted on currency[edit]

Graduates depicted on postage stamps[edit]

Graduates selected as Time Magazine's Person of the Year[edit]

Other[edit]

Non-graduates[edit]

As these alumni did not graduate, their class year represents the year they would have graduated if they had completed their education at the Academy.
NameClass yearNotabilityReferences
Zeilin, JacobJacob Zeilinex 1826First United States Marine Corps general officer, Commandant of the Marine Corps (1864–1876); part of Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan; discharged due to academics[190][191]
Poe, Edgar AllanEdgar Allan Poeex 1834Served as a non-commissioned officer in the U.S. Army 1827–1829; author who excelled in language who was expelled for neglecting duties.[192]
Whistler, James Abbott McNeillJames Abbott McNeill Whistlerex 1855Artist; discharged for academic and disciplinary problems after three years[193]
Leary, TimothyTimothy Learyex 1943Counterculture icon, LSD proponent; dropped out (and later coined phrase "Turn on, tune in, drop out")[82]
Vinatieri, AdamAdam Vinatieriex 1995National Football League (NFL) placekicker New England Patriots and Indianapolis Colts; left the Academy after two weeks[194]
Edgar Allan Poe

References[edit]

General references

^ a: Special Collections: Biographical Register of the Officers and Graduates of the U. S. Military Academy. West Point, NY: United States Military Academy Library. 1950. 
^ b: "Civil War Generals from West Point". University of Tennessee - Knoxville. 2003. Retrieved 2009-064-28.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)

Inline citations
  1. ^ a b "Quick Facts". Go Army Sports.com. Retrieved 2009-03-04. 
  2. ^ Edson, James (1954). The Black Knights of West Point. New York: Bradbury & Sayles.
  3. ^ "Army plans games for home gridiron". The New York Times. 15 January 1947. Retrieved 2009-03-04. 
  4. ^ "FAQ: Who Attends the US Military Academy". Office of Admissions. Archived from the original on 6 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-21. 
  5. ^ "Overview of the Academy". Office of Admissions. Archived from the original on 6 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-21. 
  6. ^ "College Navigator - United States Military Academy". National Center for Education Statistics, United States Department of Education. Retrieved 2009-03-21. 
  7. ^ "Academic Catalog: "The Redbook"". Office of the Dean, USMA. Archived from the original on 6 June 2009. Retrieved 2008-03-21. 
  8. ^ "Medal of Honor Citations". Army Center of Military History. Archived from the original on 15 June 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-27. 
  9. ^ "Notable USMA Graduates". United States Military Academy. Archived from the original on 6 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-21. 
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External links[edit]