List of Hindu deities

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search

Hinduism is the dominant religion of the Indian subcontinent. It comprises three major traditions, Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Shaktism,[1] whose followers considered Shiva, Vishnu and Shakti (also called as Devi) to be the supreme deity respectively. Most of the other deities were either related to them or different forms (incarnations) of these deities. Hinduism has been called the "oldest religion" in the world, and many practitioners refer to Hinduism as "the eternal law". (Sanātana Dharma).[2] Given below is a list of the chief Hindu deities followed by a list of Hindu deities (including demi-gods).

Smartism, a relatively modern Hindu tradition (compared to the three older traditions), invites the worship of more than one god including Shiva, Vishnu, Shakti, Ganesha (the elephant god) and Surya (the sun god) among other gods and goddesses. It is not as overtly sectarian as either Vashnavism or Saivism and is based on the recognition that Brahman (God) is the highest principle in the universe and pervades all of existence.[3][4][5][6]

Main Deities[edit]

The Hindu trinity consisted Shiva, Vishnu and Brahma, the followers of the first two formed two major sects.

Vishnu[edit]

Vaishnavism is the sect within Hinduism that worships Vishnu, the preserver god of the Hindu Trimurti ('three images', the Trinity), and his ten incarnations. It is a devotional sect, and followers worship many deities, including Rama and Krishna, both considered as incarnations of Vishnu. The adherents of this sect are generally non-ascetic, monastic and devoted to meditative practice and ecstatic chanting. [3][4][5][6] Some alternate names of Vishnu the Preserver:

Shiva[edit]

Saivism is the Hindu sect that worships the god Shiva. Shiva is sometimes depicted as the fierce god Bhairava. Saivists are more attracted to asceticism than adherents of other Hindu sects, and may be found wandering India with ashen faces performing self-purification rituals.[3][4][5][6] Some alternate names of Shiva:

Veerabhadra

Devi[edit]

Cults of goddess worship are ancient in India. The branch of Hinduism that worships the goddess, known as Devi, is called Shaktism. Followers of Shaktism recognize Shakti as the power that underlies the male principle, and Devi is often depicted as Parvati the consort of Shiva or as Lakshmi the consort of Vishnu. She is also depicted in other guises, such as the fierce Kali or Durga. Shaktism is closely related with Tantric Hinduism, which teaches rituals and practices for purification of the mind and body.[3][4][5][6] Some alternate names of Shakti (Devi) the Mother Goddess:

Related Deities[edit]

Avatars (Incarnations)[edit]

Vishnu[edit]

Dasavatara[edit]

  1. Matsya, the fish
  2. Kurma, the tortoise
  3. Varaha, the boar
  4. Narasimha, the Man-Lion (Nara = man, simha = lion)
  5. Vamana, the Dwarf
  6. Parashurama, Rama with the axe
  7. Rama, Sri Ramachandra, the king of Ayodhya and the hero of the epic Ramayana
  8. Krishna, a hero of the epic Mahabharata and the creator of the Bhagavad Gita (Lord's Song).
  9. Buddha, the founder of Buddhism
  10. Kalki who is expected to appear at the end of Kali Yuga, the time period in which we currently exist.

Krishna is often associated with His beloved Radha, and hence also known as Radha Krishna. Krishna was also manifested as Lord Jagannatha. People of Eastern India consider Chaitanya Mahaprabhu to be his re-incarnation. Krishna is the chief deity of the Iskcon Hare Krishna and other sects.

Sheshnag[edit]

Lakshmi[edit]

Minor Gods[edit]

The Rigveda speaks of Thirty-three gods called the Tridasha ('Three times ten'). They consisted of the 12 Adityas, the 8 Vasus, the 11 Rudras and the 2 Ashvins. Indra also called Śakra, lord of the gods, is the first of the 33 followed by Agni. Some of these brother gods were invoked in pairs such as Indra-Agni, Mitra-Varuna and Soma-Rudra.

Adityas[edit]

Vasus[edit]

Assistants of Indra and of Vishnu

Rudras[edit]

They are the 8 personifications of god Rudra and have various names.

Ashvins[edit]

The Ashvins (also called the Nāsatyas) were twin gods. Nasatya is also the name of one twin, while the other is called Dasra.

List in alphabetical order[edit]

Most of the Hindu temples are dedicated to Shiva, Vishnu (including his incarnations Krishna and Rama), Shakti (the mother goddess, hence including the forms of Durga and Kali and the goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswati), Ganesh and Hanuman.[7][8][9] The Hindu scriptures claimed that there were 33 Crore or 330 million (1 Crore = 10 million) gods. The number might be figurative but there are several names and forms for the multitude of gods. [10] Given below is an incomplete list of deities.

A[edit]

Aranyani has the distinction of having one of the most descriptive hymns in the Rigveda dedicated to her, in which she is described as being elusive, fond of quiet glades in the jungle, and fearless of remote places.

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

N[edit]

P[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

U[edit]

V[edit]

Y[edit]

* - major deities

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nath 2001, p. 31.
  2. ^ Knott 1998, p. 5.
  3. ^ a b c d http://www.himalayanacademy.com/readlearn/basics/four-sects. Retrieved 7 February 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ a b c d http://hinduism.iskcon.org/tradition/1200.htm. Retrieved 7 February 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ a b c d http://www.hinduism.co.za/hindu3.htm. Retrieved 7 February 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ a b c d Dubois. Hindu Manners, Customs and Ceremonies. Cosimo. p. 111. 
  7. ^ . Sanatan Society http://www.sanatansociety.org/hindu_gods_and_goddesses.htm#.UvSQeEKSy18. Retrieved 7 February 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ "Hinduism". About.com. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  9. ^ "Hindu gods and goddesses". usefulcharts. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  10. ^ Lynn Foulston, Stuart Abbott. Hindu goddesses: beliefs and practices. pp. 1–2.