List of Cornish writers

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Caroline Fox[1][2][3]

This is a list of writers in English and Cornish, who are associated with Cornwall and Cornish linguists. Not all of them are native Cornish people.

Some Cornish writers have reached levels of prominence, e.g. William Golding, who won the Nobel Prize for literature (in 1983), DM Thomas who won Cheltenham Prize for Literature and Arthur Quiller-Couch ("Q")

Some of the "incomers" have written extensively about Cornwall and the Cornish, e.g. Daphne du Maurier, who went as far as joining Mebyon Kernow.

Historians and scholars[edit]

See List of Cornish historians

Novelists[edit]

Poets[edit]

Playwrights and dramatists[edit]

Children's Writers[edit]

Linguists and writers in Cornish[edit]

Henry Jenner

Bards of the Gorseth Kernow[edit]

This is an honorary position, not all of the bards are Cornish or based in Cornwall. For purposes of brevity, those mentioned above are not repeated.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox, Caroline (1883). Horace N. Pym, ed. Memories of Old Friends. London: Smith, Elder, and Co.  – Frontispiece, from an etching by Sir Hubert Herkomer, after a painting by Samuel Laurence, depicting Caroline Fox, age 27. Volume 1 available online at Internet Archive and Volume 2 at Internet Archive
  2. ^ Robinson, William (1891). Friends of a Half Century. London: Edward Hicks. Retrieved 9 December 2007.  – page 138
  3. ^ Memories . . .
  4. ^ "Janie Bolitho". Retrieved 21 March 2009. 
  5. ^ Margaret Forster, 'Du Maurier, Dame Daphne (1907–1989)’, rev., Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 20 Dec 2008
  6. ^ Kevin McCarron, 'Golding, Sir William Gerald (1911–1993)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 20 Dec 2008
  7. ^ Dennis Barker, 'Graham, Winston Mawdsley (1908?–2003)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edn, Oxford University Press, Jan 2007 accessed 20 Dec 2008
  8. ^ Heald, Tim (12 March 2008). "Curriculum Vitae". Tim Heald's website. Retrieved 20 December 2008. 
  9. ^ R. G. Burnett, 'Hocking, Silas Kitto (1850–1935)’, rev. Sayoni Basu, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  10. ^ Podolsky, J. D.; Wright, John (13 September 1993). "John Le Carre". People. Retrieved 20 December 2008. 
  11. ^ "Charles Lee, author". Cornwall Calling. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  12. ^ "Jessica Mann". Retrieved 21 March 2009. 
  13. ^ "An Interview with Angie Sage". BookBrowse. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  14. ^ Kernowland children's novels
  15. ^ a b Old Croydonian Teachers database
  16. ^ Michael Millgate, 'Hardy, Thomas (1840–1928)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  17. ^ Michell, Roger (15 June 2005). "Obituary: Nick Darke". The Observer. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  18. ^ Matthew Spriggs, 'Boson family (per. c.1675–1730)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  19. ^ S. Mendyk, 'Carew, Richard (1555–1620)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  20. ^ Sale, Jonathan (31 July 2005). "How do you say 'bugger off' in Cornish?". The Observer. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  21. ^ "Piw on ni? Who are we?". Kesva an Taves Kernewek and Cornish. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  22. ^ Peter W. Thomas, 'Jenner, Henry (1848–1934)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online edn, Oxford University Press, May 2005 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  23. ^ Brian Murdoch, 'Nance, Robert Morton (1873–1959)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  24. ^ Matthew Spriggs, 'Scawen, William (1600–1689)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 16 Dec 2008
  25. ^ "The Tregear Homilies". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 

External links[edit]