List of Alpha Phi Alpha brothers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search
The Cornell University Sign at the West Campus Entrance. Cornell University was the site of the founding of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

The list of Alpha Phi Alpha brothers (commonly referred to as Alphas)[1] includes initiated and honorary members of Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ), the first inter-collegiate Greek-letter organization established for Black college students.[2] Founded on December 4, 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, Alpha Phi Alpha opened chapters at other colleges, universities, and cities, and named them with Greek-letters. Members traditionally pledge into a chapter, although some members were granted honorary status prior to the fraternity's discontinuation of the practice of granting honorary membership. A chapter name ending in "Lambda" denotes an alumni chapter.[3] The only alumni chapter that does not end in "Lambda" is Rho Chapter, located in Philadelphia, PA. No chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha is designated Omega, the last letter of the Greek alphabet that traditionally signifies "the end". Deceased brothers are respectfully referred to as having joined Omega Chapter.[4] Frederick Douglass is distinguished as the only member initiated posthumously when he became an exalted honorary member of Omega chapter in 1921.[5]

Part of a series on the
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
Category | Wikiproject
Members
Founders
General Presidents
Notable brothers
African American Firsts
Programs
World Policy Council
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Conventions
Associations
National Pan-Hellenic Council
North-American Interfraternity Conference
March of Dimes
Head Start
Boy Scouts of America
Big Brothers Big Sisters of America
Related Topics
Jena Six
Murray v. Pearson
Arizona SB 1070

The fraternity through its college and alumni chapters serves the community through nearly a thousand chapters in the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean."[6] The fraternity has been led by 33 General Presidents and its membership includes two Premiers, three Governors, a Vice President, three Senators, a Supreme Court Justice, two Presidential candidates, Nobel Prize, Pulitzer Prize, Lenin Peace Prize, Kluge Prize, Golden Globe, Academy Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award winners, and French Légion d'honneur and Croix de guerre laureates, and at least four Rhodes Scholars, eighteen Diplomats, fourteen Presidential Medal of Freedom, five Congressional Gold Medal, and seventeen Spingarn Medal recipients, and eighteen Olympians. Buildings, monuments, stadiums, arenas, courthouses, and schools have been named after Alpha men such as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, the Whitney Young Memorial Bridge, the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium, the Edward W. Brooke Courthouse, and the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.

The House of Alpha[edit]

The honor of serving as General President is especially heartfelt when one recognizes that in "The House of Alpha", the President is "One Among Equals."

James R. Williams[7]

The House of Alpha was written in 1946 by fraternity brother Sydney P. Brown as a dedicatory statement for the "Alpha House" (fraternity house) of Theta Chapter and Xi Lambda chapter who jointly shared the fraternity house. Loyalty to the Fraternity ideas was repeatedly urged by brothers on the part of those who were among the initiated, and for every chapter with the vision of a fraternity house. The statement has become a manifesto for the national fraternity and chapters, as each may symbolically be referred to as a "House of Alpha".[8][9]

Eugene K. Jones, sometimes referred to as "The Visionary Jewel" once said:

Alpha Phi Alpha, the oldest of Negro Fraternities, with all of its members presumably far above the average American and having a good and practical understanding of the salient factors involved in the Negro's problem...should be able to take into their hands the leadership in the Negro's struggle for status.[10]

Here follows a list of notable Alphas.

Founders[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Henry Arthur CallisAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; 6th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha; Physician[11][12]
Charles Henry ChapmanAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; Professor of Agriculture at FAMU[11]
Eugene Kinckle JonesAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; First Executive Director of the National Urban League; Member of President Franklin D Roosevelt's Black Cabinet[11][13]
George Biddle KelleyAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity: First Black licensed Engineer of New York[11]
Nathaniel Allison MurrayAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; Career Educator[11]
Robert Harold OgleAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; professional staff member to the U.S. Congressional Committee on Appropriations.[11]
Vertner Woodson TandyAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha; Architect, whose most famous commission was probably the mansion of Harlem millionairess Madam C.J. Walker[11][14]
Charter for Alpha Phi Alpha's Alpha chapter with signatures of founders–Cornell University. circa. 1906

Academia[edit]

Educators[edit]

Ninety-five percent of all Black Colleges have been headed by an Alpha.[9]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Herman BransonBeta GammaPresident of Central State University and Lincoln University; Co-discoverer of the Alpha helix; Sickle cell physicist[15][16]
James P. BrawleyAlpha PhiPresident of Clark College[17]
Calvin BurnettDelta LambdaPresident of Coppin State University[18]
Julius ChambersGamma BetaAttorney who argued in the Supreme Court case styled Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education; 3rd Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund; President of North Carolina Central University[18][19]
James CheekBeta RhoPresident of Howard University[20]
Thomas W. Cole, Jr.Alpha SigmaFirst President of Clark Atlanta University, President of West Virginia State University, Interim Chancellor of University of Massachusetts Amherst[21]
Thomas W. Cole, Sr.Alpha SigmaPresident of Wiley College; 21st General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][18]
Matthew DavageAlpha PhiPresident of Clark College, now Clark Atlanta University[17]
William B. DelauderBeta AlphaPresident of Delaware State University[20]
James DouglasDelta ThetaPresident of Texas Southern University[18]
John Malcus EllisonGammaFirst African American President of Virginia Union University1941[13]
Floyd H. FlakeZeta Gamma LambdaFormer US Congressman from New York; President of Wilberforce University; Pastor Greater Allen Cathedral of New York[22][23]
Ernest A. Finney, Jr.Delta AlphaChief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court; South Carolina House of Representatives; Interim President of South Carolina State University[20][24]
Luther H. Foster, Jr.Beta GammaFourth President of Tuskegee University[25]
Luther H. Foster, Sr.Gamma PhiPresident of Virginia State University[26]
Norman FrancisSigma LambdaPresident of Xavier University; President of Louisiana Recovery Authority; 2006 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient[27][28]
Robert Michael Franklin, Jr.Eta LambdaPresident of Morehouse College[29]
James GavinGamma MuPresident of Morehouse School of Medicine[17]
Hugh GlosterAlpha RhoPresident of Morehouse College[17]
George Gore, Jr.Tau LambdaFifth President of Florida A&M University; Interim President of Fisk University; Founder of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society[30][31]
Cornelius HendersonAlpha PhiPresident of Gammon Theological Seminary[18][32]
Charles A. HinesBetaPresident of Prairie View A&M University; Major General[33]
Ernest HollowayBeta Kappa14th President of Langston University[18]
John HopeEta LambdaFirst Black President of Morehouse College; President of Atlanta University; Co-founder of the Niagara Movement and NAACP; 4th President of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH); 1936 Spingarn Medal recipient[17][34][35][36]
Freeman A. Hrabowski IIIGamma IotaPresident of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County; social activist[37][38]
Frederick HumphriesBeta NuEighth President of Florida A&M University[20]
Charles S. JohnsonThetaEditor of the National Urban League's Opportunity magazine; First Black President of Fisk University[13]
Walter M. KimbroughZeta PiPresident of Philander Smith College; Author[20][39]
Raphael LanierMu LambdaUnited States Ambassador to Liberia; First President of Texas Southern University[15]
Thomas F. LawDelta RhoFirst President of Saint Paul's College[18]
John H. LewisZetaPresident of Morris Brown College[17]
John MiddletonNu Eta LambdaPresident of Morris Brown College[17]
Luna MishoeAlpha Psi LambdaPresident of Delaware State University[40]
Joseph T. McMillan, Jr.BetaFirst President of Huston-Tillotson College[18]
Frederick D. PattersonAlpha NuThird President Tuskegee University; Co-founder of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF); 1987 Presidential Medal of Freedom and 1988 Spingarn Medal recipient[27][34][41]
Benjamin PaytonBeta DeltaFifth President of Tuskegee University[18]
Henry PonderBeta KappaPresident of Talladega College, Fisk University and Benedict College; 28th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha; vice-chairman World Policy Council[12][15][42]
Earl RichardsonDelta NuPresident of Morgan State University[18]
John B. SlaughterKappa TauPresident of University of Maryland and Occidental College; First African American Director of the National Science Foundation[43]
Kent J. Smith, Jr.Beta Sigma16th President of Langston University[18]
Louis Wade SullivanAlpha RhoSecretary of Health and Human Services; Co-founder and first President of Morehouse School of Medicine[20]
Ronald TempleDelta Gamma LambdaPresident of City Colleges of Chicago[20]
Walter WashingtonGamma UpsilonPresident of Alcorn State University; 24th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][18]
Charles H. WesleyZetaPresident of Central State University; President of Wilberforce University; Executive Director and President of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASALH); 14th General President and Historian of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][20][36]
Sidney David WilliamsBeta ZetaFourth President of Elizabeth City State University[44]
Floyd Flake
Norman Francis
Charles S. Johnson
Louis Sullivan

Professors and researchers[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
David H. BlackwellTauProfessor of Mathematics University of California, Berkeley(UC Berkeley);first black admitted to the National Academy of Sciences; first tenured black professor in UC Berkeley history; former Chair of the Department of Statistics[45]
William P. FosterUpsilonCreator of the Florida A&M University Marching "100" Band[46]
John Hope FranklinAlpha ChiPresident of American Historical Association; 1995 Spingarn Medal, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and 2006 Kluge Prize recipient; Author of From Slavery To Freedom[18][34][47][48]
Hobart JarrettAlpha SigmaMember of the Wiley College Debate Team that in 1935 defeated the University of Southern California national champions; author of the second volume of The History of Sigma Pi Phi[49][50]
Elgy JohnsonAlpha OmicronMathematician[15]
Kelly MillerBeta
(Honorary)
leading African-American intellectual for more than half a century; First Black admitted to Johns Hopkins University;[20][51][52]
James A. PorterBetaFirst scholar whose book Modern Negro Art became a standard reference work on Black Art in America[53][54]
Cornel WestZeta Beta LambdaProfessor of religion at Harvard and Princeton[20]
Robert E. Weems, Jr.ThetaWillard W. Garvey Distinguished Professor of Business History at Wichita State University;acclaimed for extensive and systematic research on African American consumerism;lecturer and author of books on the economic history of African Americans including: Black Business in the Black Metropolis, Desegregating The Dollar, and Business in Black and White.[55]
John Franklin
Kelly Miller
Cornel West

Rhodes scholars[edit]

The Rhodes Scholarship is the world's oldest and arguably most prestigious international fellowship. The scholarships have been awarded to applicants annually since 1902 by the Rhodes Trust in Oxford on the basis of academic qualities, as well as those of character.

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Norman Washington ManleyBeta Beta Lambda1914 Rhodes Scholar; Premier of Jamaica, Founder of Jamaica's People's National Party[56][57]
Westley MooreSigma Sigma2001 Rhodes Scholar, New York Times Bestselling Author[58]
Randal PinkettKappa Phi Lambda1994 Rhodes Scholar; 4th Winner of NBC's reality show, The Apprentice[59][60]
Andrew ZawackiKappa Pi1994 Rhodes Scholar[27]
Westley Moore

Business[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Jesse BingaTheta

(Honorary)

Founder of Binga State Bank in Chicago[51]
Henry BrownAlpha Eta LambdaVice President for Marketing Affairs and Development with Anheuser-Busch[61]
W. Melvin BrownBeta DeltaCEO of American Development Corporation[20]
Allen CountsBetaChairman, Doley Securities, Inc.; former President, Mcclendon, Pryor, Counts (once the largest black-owned investment bank in the USA)[33]
Thomas J. BurrellThetaCEO of Burrell Advertising[20]
Nathaniel GoldstonDelta Psi LambdaCEO and founder of Gourmet Services[61]
Alonzo F. HerndonEta Lambda
(Honorary)
Founder and President of Atlanta Life Insurance; namesake of the Alonzo Herndon Stadium at Morris Brown College[17][62]
Norris HerndonSigmaPresident of Atlanta Life Insurance[63]
Eugene JacksonEpsilon PsiCEO of World African Network[40]
Charles James IIIDelta ZetaCEO of James Produce[61]
Clifton JeterBetaCEO, Agricultural Federal Credit Union; CFO of Kennedy Center[33]
John H. JohnsonThetaFounder of Johnson Publishing Company, which publishes Ebony and Jet magazines; First Black to appear on the Forbes 400 Rich List, namesake of Howard University's School of Communications, Presidential Medal of Freedom and 1966 Spingarn Medal recipient; a portion of Chicago's famed Michigan Avenue was renamed John H. Johnson Avenue[27][34][64]
L.D. Milton"unknown"President of Citizens Bank[40]
Henry ParksKappaFounder of Parks Sausage[20]
William F. PickardEpsilon XiCEO Global Automotive Alliance; professor University of Michigan School of Business; 2001 Michigan Citizen of the Year award winner; acclaimed business lecturer[65]
Samuel PierceAlphaSecretary of Housing and Urban Development; Argued before the United States Supreme Court on behalf of Martin Luther King Jr. and the New York Times in the important First Amendment case styled New York Times v. Sullivan; first African-American to serve on the Board of Directors of a Fortune 500 company[66][67][68]
Jonathan RodgersAlpha EpsilonCEO of TV One; president of CBS Television Stations, and executive producer for the CBS Morning News and Weekend Evening Newscasts[69]
Don ThompsonGamma RhoCEO and President of McDonalds, Worldwide[70]
Joshua SmithDelta XiCEO of Maxima Corporation[20]
Mark D BanksDelta Alpha LambdaPresident of Logos Consulting[20]
Alonzo Herndon
Gerald Albright
Duke Ellington

Entertainment[edit]

Music[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Cannonball AdderleyBeta NuJazz Saxophonist[71]
Gerald AlbrightIota ChiAmerican Jazz Saxophonist[20]
Jerry ButlerXi LambdaSongwriter, composer, former lead singer of The Impressions, 1991 inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, 1993 NAACP Image Award Hall of Fame inductee[20]
Duke EllingtonAlpha Zeta LambdaComposer, bandleader, actor; Grammy Award winner; 1959 Spingarn Medal and 1969 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient; Pulitzer Prize in recognition of his musical genius[20][34][72]
Marc GayBetaSinger in the R&B group Shai[20]
Lionel HamptonPhiJazz percussionist and bandleader; National Medal of Arts recipient; Goodwill Ambassador for the United States[71][73]
Antonio HartSigmaJazz Saxophonist[20]
Donny HathawayBetaSongwriter and arranger for The Staple Singers, Jerry Butler, and Aretha Franklin; singer who recorded duets with Roberta Flack, recorded the theme song to the TV series Maude[20][74]
Fletcher HendersonAlpha PhiPianist, bandleader, arranger and composer, important in the development of big band jazz and Swing music[75]
Ja A. JahannesNuPoet, playwright, composer, Spoken Word artist[71]
Edward GriffinEpsilon TauCEO of Hip Hop U-C-IT LLC.[76]
Carl MartinBetaSinger in the R&B group Shai[71]
Lionel RichieAlpha Nu LambdaSinger and member of the Commodores, Grammy Award and Academy Award winner; 2003 Hollywood Walk of Fame honoree[71][77]
Noble SissleThetaJazz composer, lyricist, bandleader, and singer of the Harlem Renaissance; lyricist of Shuffle Along which became the first hit musical on Broadway written by and about African-Americans[78][79]
Darnell Van RensalierBetaSinger in the R&B group Shai[71]
Lionel Hampton
Lionel Richie
Noble Sissle

Film, television and theatre[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Sharif AtkinsTheta

Matthew Braham Zeta Mu Actor

Actor, ER, The 4400, White Collar, Hawaii
J.L. KirkwoodBeta EtaSpoken Word Artist and Best Selling Author, TLC Four Weddings, BET Telly Award Winning Journey of Peace, ABC Chicagoing, HGTV House Hunters, DeVry Commercials, J.P. Morgan Chase Commercials, 107.5 WGCI #1 Spoken Word Artist.[80]
Darryl M. BellDelta ZetaActor, best known for A Different World[20]
Bret "E." BensonMu GammaActor, best known as: The Most Positive Actor in Georgia. National Commercials (Angie's List and others), TV, Film, Hosting, Motivational speaker, Type The Most Positive Actor in Georgia into any search engine[20]
Benny BoomPi RhoDirector of music videos[20]
Jamal MageeIota RhoTelevision actor, Stage actor[81]
Trevon DavisAlpha PhiTheatre actor in Dreamgirls, finalist on BET's Sunday's Best, appeared on MTV's Making the Band 4[81]
Rusty CundieffAlpha DeltaActor, writer; director of Tales from the Hood and the Chappelle's Show; correspondent on TV Nation[20]
Rel DowdellAlpha ChiWriter and director of feature films Train Ride, Changing the Game[20]
Todd DuncanMu LambdaFirst Black to sing with a major opera company and also the original Porgy in George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess; 1984 George Peabody Medal of Music recipient[20][82]
Derek FordjourDelta ChiProducer of "The Black Sorority Project: The Exodus", the story of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority[83]
Kevin GreviouxBetawriter, producer, actor Underworld films, The Mask, Steel, Congo, Planet of the Apes[84]
Sydney HallBetaActor in The Deal, Lord of War, and Generation Kill[85][86]
Gary HardwickEpsilonProducer, writer, director of The Brothers, Deliver Us from Eva, "Radio", and Bring It On[20]
Omari HardwickZeta PiActor in Saved, Dark Blue, and The A-Team[87][88]
Rob HardyBeta NuProducer, writer, director and actor of films such as The Gospel, Pandora's Box, Stomp the Yard, and Trois[89]
Kefla HareXi BetaTelevision actor, Reality Television Star Cast member, Road Rules: Down Under, Hip Hop Harry, Lead Character Harry, DirecTV commercial actor, Lifetime You Are Not The Man I Married, Fit TV Crave[20]
Hill HarperKappa Phi LambdaActor on CSI: NY, author of Letters to a Young Brother[90][91]
Christian KeyesAlpha Phi AlphaTelevision and movie actor, singer, and model. Diary of a Mad Black Woman, Let's Stay Together, Moonlight, Sex Chronicles[92]
Gabriel LangleyBeta SigmaCast Member, best known for College Hill, the first African American reality television show[20]
Vaughn LoweryAlphaSpokesmodel for Joe Boxer[93][94]
William PackerBeta NuProducer, writer, director and actor of films such as The Gospel, Pandora's Box, Stomp the Yard, and Trois[95]
Joseph C. PhillipsIota Zeta LambdaActor in The Cosby Show, General Hospital, and Strictly Business, political commentator on NPR's "News and Notes with Ed Gordon"[20]
Randal PinkettKappa Phi Lambda4th Winner of NBC's reality show, The Apprentice; Rhodes Scholar[59][60]
Kevin PowellZeta EtaCast member The Real World: New York, political activist, poet, writer, entrepreneur[96]
Tim ReidEta LambdaActor Sister, Sister, WKRP in Cincinnati, That 70's Show[97]
Paul RobesonNuNFL player, Actor and singer;attorney; social activist, 1945 Spingarn Medal recipient; Stalin Peace Prize laureate[34][98]
Kareem TaylorAlpha PhiVoice actor on CNN Heroes and Black in America[99]
Terrell TilfordAlpha EpsilonTelevision and movie actor, Soul Food, Days Of Our Lives, Guiding Light, One Life To Live, The Protector[100]
Keenen Ivory WayansGamma PhiCreator of comedy series In Living Color; Actor, comedian, writer, director; Emmy Award winner[20]
Jamar WhiteDelta ChiProducer of "The Black Sorority Project: The Exodus", the story of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority[83]
Drew WatkinsBetaProducer, Inside the NBA; 2-time Emmy Award winner[33]
Hill Harper
Paul Robeson

Government, law, and public policy[edit]

Note: individuals who belong in multiple sections appear in the first relevant section.

Vice Presidents and Supreme Court[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Hubert HumphreyHonorary38th Vice President of the United States; 1968 Presidential candidate; Senator from Minnesota; Mayor of Minneapolis; 1979 Congressional Gold Medal and 1980 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient[101][102][103]
Thurgood MarshallNuFirst Black Justice of U.S. Supreme Court; Attorney in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka; First Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund; 1946 Spingarn Medal and 1993 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient; Authored the Constitution for the newly independent African nation of Kenya[66][104]
Hubert Humphrey
Thurgood Marshall

Cabinet and Cabinet-level Ranks[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Lee P. BrownEpsilon BetaDirector of National Drug Control Policy; First African-American Mayor of Houston, Texas[40][105]
Robert J. BrownMu LambdaSpecial Assistant to President Nixon for Minority Affairs[106][107]
William Thaddeus Coleman, Jr.PsiSecretary of Transportation; First Black Supreme Court law clerk; co-author of the brief in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka; co-counsel on the landmark case, McLaughlin v. Florida, which established the constitutionality of interracial marriages; Editor of the Harvard Law Review; 1995 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient;[66][108]
Rayford LoganOmicronFirst Executive Director of the National Urban League; Member of President Franklin D Roosevelt's Black Cabinet; 2nd Executive Director of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH); 1980 Spingarn Medal recipient; 15th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][109]
Samuel PierceAlphaSecretary of Housing and Urban Development; Argued before the United States Supreme Court on behalf of Martin Luther King Jr. and the New York Times in the important First Amendment case styled New York Times v. Sullivan; first African-American to serve on the Board of Directors of a Fortune 500 company[66][67]
Emmett ScottHonorarySpecial Assistant to the Secretary of War[51]
Louis Wade SullivanAlpha RhoSecretary of Health and Human Services; Co-founder and first President of Morehouse School of Medicine[20]
Lee Brown
Samuel Pierce
Louis Sullivan
Edward Brooke
Roland Burris
Emanuel Cleaver
Danny Davis

Members of the United States Congress[edit]

Further information: United States Congress
NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Edward BrookeBetaSenator from Massachusetts; Attorney General of Massachusetts; Chairman Emeritus of World Policy Council; 1967 Spingarn Medal and 2004 Presidential Medal of Freedom and Congressional Gold Medal recipient[33][66][110]
Roland BurrisBeta EtaSenator from Illinois–appointed to fill the seat vacated by President Barack Obama; First Black Illinois Attorney General[111][112]
Emanuel CleaverEta GammaRepresentative from Missouri; Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri[27][113]
Danny K. DavisGamma DeltaRepresentative from Illinois[114]
William DawsonThetaRepresentative from Illinois;First African-American chairman of a regular House Committee(Committee on Expenditures in Executive Department); Dawson Technical Institute at Kennedy-King College(Chicago) named in his honor[20]
Ron DellumsDelta OmicronRepresentative from California; Co-founder of the Congressional Black Caucus; Mayor of Oakland; Lead the fight in the U.S. against South African apartheid.[66][115][116]
Julian C. DixonGamma XiRepresentative from California[66]
Chaka FattahZeta Omicron LambdaRepresentative from Pennsylvania[20]
Floyd H. FlakeZeta Gamma LambdaRepresentative from Illinois; President of Wilberforce University[22][23]
Harold Ford, Sr.Beta OmicronRepresentative from Tennessee; Legislator of Tennessee[66]
William H. GrayRhoRepresentative from Pennsylvania; House Majority Whip and House Democratic Whip; CEO of the United Negro College Fund[20]
Al GreenBeta NuRepresentative from Texas[114]
Earl F. HilliardAlpha RhoRepresentative from Alabama; Legislator of Alabama[66]
Gregory W. MeeksZeta Zeta LambdaRepresentative from New York; New York State Assembly[66]
Ralph MetcalfeAlpha XiRepresentative from Illinois; Co-founder of the Congressional Black Caucus; 1932 and 1936 Olympian; Ralph H. Metcalfe Federal Building(Chicago) named in his honor.[66][116]
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.Etafirst Black Representative from New York(Harlem); Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee; early civil rights and racial equality legislation advocate;long-time Pastor of Abyssinian Baptist Church[66]
Charles B. RangelAlpha Gamma LambdaRepresentative from New York; Co-founder of the Congressional Black Caucus; First Black to chair the Committee on Ways and Means; New York State Assembly Representative; Marine combat veteran awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart medals[20][116][117]
David ScottBeta NuRepresentative from Georgia[118]
Robert C. ScottSigmaRepresentative from Virginia[20]
Bennett M. StewartXi LambdaRepresentative from Illinois[24]
Hansen ClarkeGamma LambdaRepresentative from Michigan[119]
William Dawson
Ron Dellums
Julian Dixon
Chaka Fattah
Harold Ford, Sr.
William H. Gray
Al Green
Earl Hilliard
Gregory Meeks

|- style="vertical-align:top;" class="vcard" | class="fn" | Steven Horsford | style="text-align:center;" class="org" | Eta Lambda | class="note" | Representative from Nevada | style="text-align:center;" | [119]

U.S. Governors and Lieutenant Governors[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Walter A. GordonAlpha Epsilon17th Governor of the United States Virgin Islands; Federal District Judge of the United States Virgin Islands[120][121]
Joe RogersOmicron TauLieutenant Governor of Colorado[122]
Roy L. SchneiderBeta25th Governor of the United States Virgin Islands[33]
Charles Wesley TurnbullGamma Iota26th Governor of the United States Virgin Islands[122][123]
James R. WilliamsAlpha TauLieutenant Governor of Ohio candidate, 25th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[7][12]
Ralph Metcalfe
Adam Powell, Jr.
Charles Rangel
David Scott

Diplomats[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Orison Rudolph AggreyGamma IotaAmbassador to Republic of The Gambia, Republic of Senegal, and Romania[66]
Archibald Carey, Jr.ThetaDiplomat; attorney; Circuit Court Judge; Pastor[124][125]
Walter CarringtonSigmaAmbassador to Republic of Senegal and Federal Republic of Nigeria[126][127]
Horace DawsonNuAmbassador to Republic of Botswana; Director of the Ralph Bunche International Affairs Center, Howard University; Chairman of the World Policy Council[15]
Frederick Douglass*Honorary*Minister to Republic of Haiti; Anti-slavery activist[27][128]
Lionel HamptonPhiGoodwill Ambassador; Jazz percussionist and bandleader; National Medal of Arts recipient[71][73]
James A. JosephBeta SigmaAmbassador to South Africa; Under Secretary of Interior[20]
Kenton KeithUpsilonAmbassador to State of Qatar[42]
Raphael LanierMu LambdaMinister to Liberia; First President of Texas Southern University[15]
Delano LewisUpsilonAmbassador to South Africa; President and Chief Executive Officer of National Public Radio; President of The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company[20][129]
Donald McHenryEta TauAmbassador to United Nations[66]
John H. MorrowDelta IotaFirst United States Ambassador to Guinea after its independence; first U.S. Representative to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)[130][131]
Gerald Eustis ThomasSigmaAmbassador to Guyana and Kenya; Admiral U.S. Navy[24][132]
Terence Todman"unknown"Ambassador to Republic of Chad, Guinea, Costa Rica, Spain, Denmark, and Argentina[24][132]
Lester WaltonEtaMinister to Liberia[133][134]
Clifton Reginald Wharton, Sr.SigmaAmbassador to Norway and Minister to Romania[63][135]
Franklin H. WilliamsNuAmbassador to Republic of Ghana and the United Nations; President of the Phelps-Stokes Fund[20]
Andrew YoungBetaAmbassador to The United Nations; Representative from Georgia; 2-term Mayor of Atlanta; 1990 Governor of Georgia candidate; 1978 Spingarn Medal, 1981 Presidential Medal of Freedom, and French Légion d'honneur recipient[27][34][136][137]
Robert Scott
Charles Turnbull
Frederick Douglass
Lionel Hampton
Andrew Young

Mayors[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Dennis ArcherAlpha UpsilonJustice of the Michigan Supreme Court; Mayor of Detroit, Michigan; First Black President of the American Bar Association[20][138]
Richard Arrington, Jr.Gamma KappaFirst Black Mayor of Birmingham[20]
Thomas V. BarnesGamma RhoMayor of Gary, Indiana[24]
Marion BarryBeta XiMayor of Washington, D.C.; first Chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)[15][139]
Ted BerryAlpha AlphaFirst Black Mayor of Cincinnati; Board member of the NAACP[140]
Byron BrownDelta EpsilonSenator of New York; First Black Mayor of Buffalo[141]
Willie BrownXi RhoFirst Black Mayor of San Francisco; Speaker of the California State Assembly The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is in part named in his honor.[20][142]
David DinkinsBetaFirst Black Mayor of New York City[20]
Gow FieldsMu Zeta LambdaFirst Black Mayor of Lakeland, Florida[143]
Maynard JacksonAlpha RhoFirst Black and 3-term Mayor of Atlanta; Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Airport is in part named in his honor[20]
Harvey Johnson, Jr.Beta OmicronFirst Black Mayor of Jackson, Mississippi[144]
Kwame KilpatrickBeta NuMayor of Detroit who resigned after pleading guilty to felony charges stemming from a text message scandal; convicted of federal charges including racketeering and extortion.[20][145][146]
Marc MorialPsiLouisiana State Legislature; Mayor of New Orleans; 8th CEO of the National Urban League[27][147]
Ernest Nathan MorialBeta TauLouisiana State Legislature;First Black Mayor of New Orleans; namesake of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans[27]
Rudolph McCollum Jr.BetaMayor of Richmond[33]
James McGeeXiFirst Black Mayor of Dayton[148]
Norm RiceAlpha XiFirst and only African-American Mayor of Seattle[27]
Eugene SawyerBeta UpsilonMayor of Chicago[40]
Lionel WilsonAlpha EpsilonFirst Black Mayor of Oakland[27]
AC WhartonBeta OmicronMayor of Memphis, Tennessee[27]
Marion Barry
Byron Brown
Willie Brown
David Dinkins

Judges and Lawyers[edit]

Seventy-five percent of all Black Male Lawyers are Alphas.[9]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Robert BenhamEta LambdaChief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia[17]
Joe BrownKappa EtaHost of the syndicated show Judge Joe Brown; Presided over James Earl Ray's last appeal for Ray's conviction for the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.;[20][149]
Robert L. CarterNuPivotal role in Sweatt v. Painter, Brown v. Board of Education, and NAACP v. Alabama; U.S. District Court Judge; 2004 Spingarn Medal recipient; Federal District Appellate Judge[34][150][151]
Julius ChambersGamma BetaAttorney in the Supreme Court case styled Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education; 3rd Director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund; President of North Carolina Central University[18][19]
Christopher DardenEpsilon MuProsecutor in the murder trial of O. J. Simpson[152]
Milton C. DavisGamma PhiAssistant Attorney General of the state of Alabama who researched and wrote opinions which led Governor George Wallace to pardon Clarence Norris, the last known surviving defendant in the international cause célèbre case of the Scottsboro Boys; 29th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][153]
Harry T. Edwards"unknown"Justice for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit[66]
Ernest A. Finney, Jr.Delta AlphaChief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court; South Carolina House of Representatives; Interim President of South Carolina State University[20][24]
Charles Hamilton HoustonSigmachief architect of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund's strategy for racial equality in dismantling the Jim Crow laws; First Black Editor of the Harvard Law Review; 1950 Spingarn Medal recipient[34][63][154]
Harry E. JohnsonBeta TauPresident of the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc., which oversees the fundraising, design, and construction of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial; 31st General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][155]
Damon KeithAlpha ZetaChief Justice of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan who famously ruled in United States v. Sinclair (upheld in United States v. U.S. District Court) that President Nixon's Attorney General John Mitchell had to disclose the transcripts of illegal wiretaps that Mitchell had authorized without first obtaining a search warrant; 1974 Spingarn Medal recipient[66][156]
Belford Lawson, Jr.EpsilonCo-founder of New Negro Alliance; successfully argued in United States Supreme Court cases styled New Negro Alliance v. Sanitary Grocery Co. to safeguard the right to boycott, and Henderson v. United States that abolished segregation in railroad dining cars; 16th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][157]
Greg MathisGamma LambdaHost of television series Judge Mathis[158][159]
Daryl D. ParksBeta NuManaging partner in the law firm that represented the parents of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, and the family of Eric Garner[160]
Jawn SandiferAlpha OmicronChief Justice of the New York Supreme Court; one of two staff lawyers for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People who successfully argued Henderson v. United States[161][162]
Michael A. ShippDelta IotaOn January 23, 2012, President Obama nominated Shipp to be a United States District Judge for the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey.[163]
Arthur ShoresAlpha BetaAttorney in Lucy v. Adams which prevented the University of Alabama from denying admission to applicants solely on account of race or color. Civil rights activist; Namesake of both the Arthur Davis Shores Law Center and A. D. Shores Park in Birmingham, Alabama[164][165]
A. P. TureaudBetaAttorney in Garner v. Louisiana which legalized sit-in protests at segregated private businesses and restaurants.[166][167]
Horace WardAlpha RhoSenator of Georgia; first African American to serve on the federal bench in Georgia.[17][168]
Kwame Kilpatrick
Marc Morial
Norm Rice
Joe Brown
Robert Carter

Other U.S. political and legal figures[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
William T. Andrews"unknown"New York State Assembly[133]
Daniel T. Blue, Jr.Gamma BetaNorth Carolina House of Representatives; Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives; 2002 Democratic candidate for the United States Senate[66][169]
Al Edwards"unknown"Texas House of Representatives; considered the father of the Juneteenth Holiday[170]
Carl McCallTheta ZetaLegislator of New York; Comptroller of New York; 2002 Democratic candidate for Governor of New York[66][171]
William Byron RumfordGamma Phi LambdaCalifornia State Legislature[172][173]
Albert VannAlpha Xi LambdaNew York State Assembly[174]
Herb WessonNuCalifornia State Assembly; Speaker of the California State Assembly[175]
Tyrone YatesAlpha AlphaOhio House of Representatives[176]

Government officials outside the U.S.[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
E. David BurtNu BetaMember of Parliament, Deputy Leader of the Progressive Labour Party, and Former Senator, Bermuda[177]
Shawn Crockwell"unknown"Member of Parliament and Minister of Tourism Development & Transport, Bermuda[178]
Stuart HaywardBetaHouse of Assembly of Bermuda[33]
Norman Washington ManleyBeta Beta LambdaPremier of Jamaica, Founder of Jamaica's People's National Party, 1914 Rhodes Scholar[56][57]
Diallo RabainEpsilon Theta LambdaOpposition Senate Leader and Senator, Bermuda[179]
Edward RichardsEpsilon Theta LambdaFirst Premier of Bermuda[180]
Lawrence Scott"unknown"Member of Parliament, Bermuda. Son of former Premier of Bermuda William Alexander Scott[181]
Peter TurnquestEta GammaMember of Parliament, Deputy Leader of the Free National Movement Party, The Bahamas[181]

Journalist and media personalities[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Ron AllenPsiNews correspondent for NBC and ABC[182][183]
Tony BrownAlpha UpsilonCommentator of the syndicated television show; Tony Brown's Journal; founding dean of Howard University's School of Communication[20][184]
Malvin Russell GoodeOmicronFirst Black news correspondent for ABC as a United Nations reporter[20]
Jay HarrisNu ThetaSportscaster for ESPN on SportsCenter and ESPNEWS[185][186]
Stan VerrettBetaSportscaster for ESPN on SportsCenter and ESPNEWS[187]
Roland S. MartinPi OmicronEditor of the Chicago Defender, radio talk show host; contributor to CNN[188][189]
Stuart ScottMu ZetaSportscaster for ESPN on SportsCenter[20]
Chuck StoneAlpha KappaSpeechwriter for Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.; First president of the National Association of Black Journalists; Tuskegee Airman[20][190][191]
Lewis Ossie SwinglerAlpha DeltaEditor of the Sphinx; editor in chief of the Memphis World; Co-founder and editor in chief of the Tri-State Defender; southern vice president of Alpha Phi Alpha during the Montgomery Bus Boycott[192][193]

Literature[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Countee CullenEtaPoet of the Harlem Renaissance[71]
Eric Jerome DickeyKappa EtaAuthor[20]
E. Lynn HarrisKappa KappaAuthor, playwright[20]
Chester HimesKappaAuthor whose works include If He Hollers Let Him Go and a series of Harlem Detective novels[20][not in citation given][194]
Lawrence RossAlpha EpsilonAuthor of The Divine Nine: The History of African American Fraternities and Sororities[20]
Carl WeberBeta GammaAuthor[20]
Frank YerbyThetaBest selling author[20]
Countee Cullen

Military service[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
David L. BrewerGamma ZetaAdmiral, United States Navy; Superintendent L.A. Unified School District, community activist.[195]
Wesley A. BrownSigmaLieutenant Commander; First Black graduate from United States Naval Academy; the Wesley A. Brown Field House at the U.S. Naval Academy is named in his honor[196]
Roscoe CartwrightAlpha ZetaGeneral, United States Army[27]
Victor DalyAlphaFrench Croix de Guerre recipient; novelist and author[197]
Amos M. Gailliard Jr.Zeta Zeta LambdaOne Star General, United States Army, New York Guard
Walter E. GaskinDelta EtaThree Star General, United States Marine Corps[198]
Fred A. GordenMu Beta LambdaBrigadier General; First African-American First Captain of the West Point Academy[27][199]
Samuel L. Gravely, Jr.GammaFirst African American Admiral, United States Navy; First African American to command a U.S. fleet; the Arleigh Burke class warship U.S.S. Gravely (DDG 107) was named in Admiral Gravely's honor and commissioned on November, 20th 2010.[20]
Benjamin Thurman HackerEpsilon Mu LambdaRear Admiral, United States Navy[20]
Edward HonorBeta SigmaMajor General, United States Army[20]
James McCallPsiMajor General Chief in the Pentagon Budget Office[27]
Charles McGeeTauColonel, United States Air Force; original Tuskegee Airman and 30 year career officer in the USAF. Col. McGee holds an Air Force record 409 fighter combat missions flown in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam; awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Air Medal, and Army Commendation Medals. In 2007 President George W. Bush awarded Col. McGee the Congressional Gold Medal, and in 2011 he was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame.[143]
Winston E. ScottAlpha Phi LambdaAstronaut, Johnson Space Center[20]
Bobby WilksAlpha EtaFirst African American Coast Guard aviator and the first African American to reach the rank of Coast Guard captain[143]
Johnnie E. WilsonTheta Theta LambdaFour Star General, United States Army[200]
Samuel Gravely
Benjamin Hacker
Winston E. Scott
Johnnie Wilson

Religion[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
John Hurst AdamsAlpha OmicronPresident of Congress of Black Churches[201]
Vinton R. AndersonXi92nd Bishop of African Methodist Episcopal Church; President of World Council of Churches[42]
Tyrone CriderTheta Mu LambdaNational Director of Operation PUSH[201][202]
Harold Davis (Pastor)Beta SigmaPresident of American Baptist Churches[201]
Cain Hope FelderBetaFirst national director of the United Methodist Black Caucus; Professor of Theology at Howard University and Princeton University; Editor of The African American Jubilee Bible[33][203]
T. J. JemisonBeta UpsilonCo-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); President of National Baptist Convention; Organized the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott of 1953[20]
E. Edward JonesDelta SigmaPresident of National Baptist Convention, America[201]
Martin Luther King, Jr.Sigma1962 Nobel Peace Prize; Civil rights activist; Co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established in honor; 1957 Spingarn Medal, 1977 Presidential Medal of Freedom, and 2004 Congressional Gold Medal recipient; first African American with a memorial on the National Mall[27][34][204]
Alfred J. Smith"unknown"President of Progressive National Baptist Convention[201]

Science[edit]

Sixty percent of all Black Male Doctors and sixty-five percent of all Black Male Dentists are Alphas.[9]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Herman BransonBeta GammaPresident of Central State University and Lincoln University; Co-discoverer of the Alpha helix; Sickle cell physicist[15][16]
James ComerGamma EtaProminent child psychiatrist; Founder of the Comer School Development Program at the Yale Child Study Center; associate dean at the Yale School of Medicine[20][205]
Lloyd HallAlpha MuChemist who contributed to the science of food preservation. Author of 59 United States patents, and a number of his inventions were also patented in foreign countries[206]
LaSalle Leffall, Jr.Beta NuPresident of American College of Surgeons; President of American Cancer Society[20]
Garrett A. MorganDelta Alpha LambdaInventor who originated a respiratory protective hood (similar to the modern gas masks) and a hair-straightening preparation; patented a type of traffic light signal[20][207]
Earl W. RenfroeThetaOrthodontist, for many years, he was acknowledged as one of the best hands-on clinical orthodontics instructors in the world; a dental facility in Barbados is named after Renfroe[208]
Louis Wade SullivanAlpha RhoSecretary of Health and Human Services; CO-founder and first President of Morehouse School of Medicine[20]
Levi Watkins, Jr.Beta OmicronChief of cardiovascular surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital; Performed the world's first human implantation of the automatic implantable defibrillator; First African-American medical student at Vanderbilt University[20]
J. Marshall ShepherdKappa Phi LambdaPhysicist; NASA Meteorologist; Professor University of Georgia; renowned expert on global climate change and environmental issues[209]
Garrett Morgan
Earl Renfroe

Service and social reform[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Julius ChambersGamma BetaAttorney in the Supreme Court case styled Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education; 3rd Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund; President of North Carolina Central University[18][19]
Frederick DouglassOmega
(Honorary)
United States Ambassador to Haiti; Anti-slavery activist[27][128]
W. E. B. Du BoisEpsilon
(Honorary)
Co-founder of Niagara Movement and NAACP; Founder and Editor-in-Chief of The Crisis; First African American to receive a PhD from Harvard University; 1920 Spingarn Medal recipient; Author of "The Souls of Black Folks"[27][34]
Henry EdwardsBetaWorld-famous sociologist[18]
E. Franklin FrazierBetaFirst Black President of the American Sociological Association; Sociologist on race relations;[20]
Lloyd L. GainesAlpha PsiCentral figure of one of the most important cases in the U.S. civil rights movement–Supreme Court case styled Gaines v. Canada[210]
Lester GrangerTheta Zeta3rd Executive Secretary of the National Urban League[27]
Dick GregoryBeta Eta1968 Presidential candidate; comedian, social activist, writer[27][211]
George Edmond HaynesBetaFounder and First President of the National Urban League; First African American to receive a PhD from Columbia University[212]
John HopeEta LambdaFirst Black President of Atlanta University; President of Atlanta University; Co-founder of the Niagara Movement and NAACP; 4th President of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH); 1936 Spingarn Medal recipient[17][34][35][36]
T. J. JemisonBeta UpsilonCo-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; President of the National Baptist Convention; Organized the Baton Rouge Bus Boycott of 1953[20]
Charles S. JohnsonThetaEditor of the National Urban League's Opportunity magazine; First Black President of Fisk University[13]
Lyman T. JohnsonGammaPlaintiff whose successful legal challenge opened the University of Kentucky to African-American students in 1949[213]
Eugene K. JonesAlphaCo-founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; 2nd Executive Director of the National Urban League; Member of President Franklin D Roosevelt's Black Cabinet[11][13]
Martin Luther King, Jr.Sigma1962 Nobel Peace Prize; Civil rights activist; Co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established in honor; 1957 Spingarn Medal, 1977 Presidential Medal of Freedom, and 2004 Congressional Gold Medal recipient; first African American with a memorial on the National Mall[27][34][204]
Martin Luther King IIIEta LambdaPresident and CEO of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change; former president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)[29]
Rayford LoganOmicronFirst Executive Director of the National Urban League; Member of President Franklin D Roosevelt's Black Cabinet; 2nd Executive Director of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH); 1980 Spingarn Medal recipient; 15th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][109]
Joseph LoweryEta LambdaCo-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); delivered the benediction at the inauguration of Barack Obama in 2009; 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient[29]
Jesse E. MoorlandBetaCo-founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH); namesake of Howard University's Moorland-Spingarn Research Center[214][215]
Marc MorialPsiLouisiana State Legislature; Mayor of New Orleans; 8th CEO of the National Urban League[27][147]
Floyd McKissick"unknown"2nd President of Congress of Racial Equality; Founder of Soul City[216][217]
Hugh Bernard PriceEta Alpha Lambda7th President of the National Urban League[20]
Paul RobesonNuNFL player, Actor and singer; social activist, 1945 Spingarn Medal recipient; Stalin Peace Prize laureate[34][98]
Jawn SandiferAlpha OmicronChief Justice of the New York Supreme Court; one of two staff lawyers for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) who successfully argued Henderson v. United States[161][162]
Ozell SuttonPi LambdaCo-founder of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children; 2012 Congressional Gold Medal recipient; 26th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity; Original Monford Point Marine[218]
Heman SweattAlpha SigmaPlaintiff in the U.S. Supreme Court case styled Sweatt v. Painter that successfully challenged the "separate but equal" doctrine of racial segregation established by the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson[219]
Channing Heggie TobiasBetaChairman of the NAACP, Director of the Phelps-Stokes Fund; 1948 Spingarn Medal recipient[34][220]
C.T. VivianEta LambdaCivil rights activist and aide to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; 2013 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient; author and humanitarian[221]
Wyatt Tee WalkerGammaCo-founder and 3rd Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); Civil and human rights activist[201][222]
Alfred Bitini Xuma"unknown"President of the African National Congress[223][224]
Max YerganTheta2nd President of the National Negro Congress; Co-founder of the International Council on African Affairs; 1933 Spingarn Medal recipient[34][225][226]
Whitney YoungBeta Mu4th President of the National Urban League; 1968 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient; namesake of the Whitney Young Memorial Bridge[227]
Frederick Douglass
W. E. B. Du Bois
Dick Gregory
Charles S. Johnson
Martin Luther King III
Joseph Lowery
Marc Morial
Whitney Young

Sports[edit]

Note: individuals who belong in multiple sections appear in the first relevant section.

Olympics[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Dave AlbrittonKappa1936 Olympian, high jump; inducted into the USA Track & Field Hall of Fame, 1980[228]
Don BarksdaleGamma Xi1948 Olympian and first African American to play with the USA Olympic Basketball Team; NBA player[229][230]
Walt BellamyGamma Eta1960 Olympian NBA player; NBA Rookie of the Year(1962); NBA Hall of Fame(1993)[231]
Quinn BucknerGamma Eta1976 Olympian; NBA player[20][232]
James A. ButtsEta Pi Lambda1976 Olympian, Track and Field[233]
Otis DavisAlpha DeltaWinner of two gold medals for record-breaking performances in both the 400 metres and 4x400 metres relay at the 1960 Summer Olympics[234]
Phil EdwardsEtaOlympic athlete and winner of 5 bronze medals[234]
Sayon CooperDelta Xi2000 Olympian, Track and Field[235]
Edward GourdinAlpha Eta1924 Olympian; first man to make 25 feet in the long jump[236][237]
Chris HuffinsAlpha EpsilonBronze medalist in 2000 Olympics[238]
Cornelius Johnson"unknown"1932 and 1936 Olympian, high jump[239]
Mel LattanyZeta PiGold medal winner at the IAAF World Cup, Summer Universiade, and Liberty Bell Classic. Was not able to compete in the 1980 Olympics due to the U.S. boycott on Russia, but held the world record that year in 100m[234]
Ralph MetcalfeNu XiRepresentative from Illinois; 1932 and 1936 Olympian[20][240]
Manteo MitchellNu Zeta2012 Silver medalist in Track and Field[241]
Godfrey MurrayEpsilon1972 Track and Field Olympian[242]
Jesse OwensKappa1936 Olympian in Track and Field, Associated Press Athlete of the Year, 1936; 1976 Presidential Medal of Freedom and 1990 Congressional Gold Medal recipient; namesake of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University[20][243]
Fritz Pollard, Jr.Alpha Gamma1936 Olympian, 110m hurdles[239]
Mike PowellOmicron Eta1988 and 1992 Olympian, long jump[20]
Andrew StanfieldAlpha Alpha Lambda1952 and 1956 Olympian, Track and Field[239]
Eddie TolanEpsilon1932 Olympian, 100 and 200 metres[235]
Lenny WilkensZeta Pi LambdaNBA player and coach; 1996 Olympian, Basketball Coach[20][244]
Archibald WilliamsAlpha Epsilon1936 Olympian, Track and Field[239]
John WoodruffOmicron1936 Olympian, Track and Field[239]
Kevin YoungGamma Xi1988 and 1992 Olympian, Track and field[229][245]
Jesse Owens and Ralph Metcalfe
Mike Powell

American basketball[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Nate ArchibaldTheta Delta LambdaNBA player, Basketball Hall of Fame, voted one of the NBA 50 All Time Greatest Players[20]
Don BarksdaleGamma Xi1948 Olympian and first African American to play with the USA Olympic Basketball Team;, first African American consensus All American college basketball player, NBA player, first African American to play in the NBA All star game, Basketball Hall of Fame[229][230]
Walt BellamyGamma Eta1960 Olympian NBA player, Basketball Hall of Fame[246]
Junior BridgemanDelta Chi LambdaNBA player, 12 years in the NBA, Number was retired by the Milwaukee Bucks[235]
John O. Brown"unknown"Basketball coach for Dillard University[235]
Quinn BucknerGamma Eta1976 Olympian; NBA player, 10 seasons in the NBA[20][232]
Todd DayKappa KappaNBA player, 9 seasons in the NBA[27]
Wayne EmbryDelta UpsilonNBA player and General Manager; 5 time NBA All Star, Basketball Hall of Fame[40]
Clyde FletcherKappa KappaNBA player, player for Arkansas Razorbacks 1990 NCAA Final Four team[247][248]
Walt Frazier"unknown"NBA Player, Basketball Hall of Fame, 2x NBA Champion, 7x NBA All-Star, 4x All NBA First Team, 2x All NBA Second Team, 7x All Defensive First Team, NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team[249]
Stan McKenzieDelta LambdaNBA player, 7 seasons in the NBA[250]
Jim McMillianEtaNBA Player, 3 time college All-American, 3 time Haggerty Award winner, 9 seasons in the NBA[251]
Chris MillsEta Epsilon LambdaNBA player, 10 seasons in the NBA[27]
Bobby PhillsBeta SigmaNBA player, Continental Basketball Association player[40]
Garrett TempleNu PsiNBA player[252]
Wes Unseld"unknown"NBA player and coach, Basketball Hall of Fame[27]
Walt WesleyUpsilonNBA player, ten seasons in the NBA[250]
Lenny WilkensZeta Pi LambdaNBA player and coach; 2nd most wins all-time in NBA history, 1994 NBA Coach of the Year, 1996 Olympian, Basketball Coach, Basketball Hall of Fame,twice inducted into the Hall of Fame as both a player and a coach; the first and only African American so honored.[20][244]
John "Hot Rod" WilliamsRho IotaNBA player, 13 seasons in the NBA[27]
George GregoryEtaIn 1931, he became the first black basketball player to be selected as an All-American
John Woodruff

American football[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Emmanuel ArceneauxDelta KappaNFL player, Minnesota Vikings[253]
Bobby BellMuNational Football League (NFL) player, Pro Football Hall of Fame[254][255]
Gordon BellEpsilonNFL player[256]
Wes ChandlerTheta SigmaNFL player, 4 time Pro Bowl player, 2 time college All American; 2014 College Football Hall of Fame inductee[20]
Michael ClaytonNu PsiNFL player[257]
Don ColemanGamma TauNFL player, first African American All-American football player at Michigan State University. First MSU player to have jersey retired and first African American to serve on the MSU coaching staff. College Football Hall of Fame[258]
Greg ColemanBeta NuNFL player, First African American punter in the NFL[235]
Marco ColemanNu MuNFL player, 14 Seasons in the NFL. Pro Bowler[259]
Canute CurtisPi MuNFL player[260]
Chris DolemanOmicronNFL player, Pro Football Hall of Fame, 8x Pro Bowl selection, 3x First Team All Pro selection, 2x Second Team All Pro selection, 4x First Team All NFC, 2x Second Team All NFC, NFL 1990's All Decade Team[261]
Donald DriverDelta KappaNFL player, 3 time Pro Bowler; Author[257]
Carl EllerMuNFL player, 2004 Pro Football Hall of Fame[261]
Mel Farr, Jr.Gamma XiNFL player[229][262]
Mike FarrGamma XiNFL player[229][263]
Charles FisherPi MuNFL player, 12 years in the NFL[264]
Barry Foster"unknown"NFL player, 2 time pro bowler[264]
Julius FranksEpsilonFirst African American to become an All American football player at the University of Michigan[265]
Derrick GaffneyTheta SigmaNFL player, 9 years in the NFL[266][267]
Nesby GlasgowAlpha XiNFL player, 14 years in the NFL[268][269]
Barrett GreenPi MuNFL player, 7 years in the NFL[260]
Sammy GreenTheta SigmaNFL player[266][270]
Rosey GrierGamma NuNFL player, 2 time Pro Bowler; Singer; Actor, best known for The Thing with Two Heads; helped apprehend Sirhan Sirhan in the immediate aftermath of Robert F. Kennedy's assassination[271]
Charles HaleyXi DeltaNFL player, 5 time Pro Bowl player[27]
T. J. HeathXi XiNFL Player, Jacksonville Jaguars[253]
Darryl HenleyGamma XiNFL player and college All American[272]
Eddie HintonZeta ZetaNFL player, Baltimore Colts, played in Super Bowl V, former all-time leading receiver at the University of Oklahoma[273]
Darius HollandAlpha IotaNFL Player, 10 seasons in the NFL[274]
Duke IhenachoEpsilon MuNFL player[275]
Michael JacksonMu XiNFL player, 8 years in the NFL[27]
Trezelle JenkinsEpsilonNFL player[264]
Demetrious JohnsonZeta AlphaNFL player, founder of the Demetrious Johnson Charitable Foundation[276]
Ron JohnsonEpsilonNFL player, 2 time Pro Bowler, College Football Hall of Fame, College football All-American, Chairman of the National Football Foundation[277]
Tyrell JohnsonTheta UpsilonNFL Player, Starting Strong Safety for the Minnesota Vikings 2008 to Present[253]
Dhani JonesEpsilonNFL player, 11 seasons in the NFL; TV Personality[235]
Steve JordanAlpha GammaNFL player, 6 time Pro Bowler[235]
Lewis KellyBeta DeltaNFL player, 6 seasons[278]
Reggie KellyKappa BetaNFL player[279]
Carnell LakeGamma XiNFL player, 5 time Pro Bowler, NFL 1990s All Decade Team[20]
Henry LawrenceBeta NuNFL player, 2 time Pro Bowler[235]
Mark LeeAlpha XiNFL player, 11 years in the NFL[268][280]
Cliff LouisDelta Alpha LambdaNFL Signed by the Cleveland Browns as an undrafted free agent in 2007. Former member of the Jacksonville Jaguars, New York Giants, Florida Tuskers, Arizona Cardinals, Edmonton Eskimos, Detroit Lions, and Dallas Cowboys. Offensive tackle for the Cleveland Gladiators of the Arena Football League.[261]
Mike MerriweatherNu ChiNFL player, 3 time Pro Bowl player[235]
Ronald MooreGamma ChiNFL player[281]
Bill MunseyMuNFL player CFL player[254]
Adrian MurrellPi MuNFL player, 10 years in the NFL[264]
Marques MurrellPi NuNFL player[257]
Leo LeMarcus NewmanAlpha Eta LambdaNFL player[264]
Vincent NewsomeAlpha XiNFL player, (current assistant director of pro personnel for Baltimore Ravens)[282]
Roman ObenAlpha PiNFL player, 9 years in the NFL[283]
Brig OwensAlpha AlphaNFL player, 11 years in the NFL, Included in the list of "70 Greatest Red Skins"[235]
Michael PittmanEpsilon BetaNFL player, 10 years in the NFL[257]
Fritz PollardAlpha GammaOne of the first two Black players in the NFL in 1920; first Black head coach in the NFL; 2005 Pro Football Hall of Fame[27]
Marcus PollardEpsilon KappaNFL player, 14 years in the NFL[20]
Jethro PughBeta ZetaNFL player, 13 years in the NFL[235]
Jay RatliffOmicron KappaNFL player, 3x Pro Bowl selection, 1x First Team All Pro selection[253]
Ken RileyBeta NuNFL player, 15 years in the NFL[284]
Paul RobesonNuNFL player, 2 time college football All-American, College Football Hall of Fame, Actor and singer; social activist, 1945 Spingarn Medal recipient; Stalin Peace Prize laureate[34][98]
Eddie RobinsonBeta Iota LambdaHead of Grambling State University football program for 56 years, established himself as the winningest coach in college football history, becoming the first coach to record 400 wins, and recorded 408 total career wins[235]
Bernard RussPi MuNFL player[260]
Art ShellDelta NuNFL player, 4 time Pro Bowl player; Pro Football Hall of Fame; Second Black head coach in the NFL[40]
Olaniyi SobomehinAlpha XiNFL player[257]
Max StarksTheta SigmaNFL player, 2 time Super Bowl Champion[285]
Sandy StephensMuNFL player; First African American All-American Quarterback, Rose Bowl Hall of Fame[254][286]
Lemuel StinsonEta UpsilonNFL player[235]
Woody StrodeAlpha DeltaNFL player, One of the first two African-Americans to play in the NFL's modern (post-World War II) era, actor nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor[287]
Billy TaylorEpsilonMichigan University football All American and school record holder of rushing yardage, CFL player[288]
John ThorntonPi MuNFL player, 9 years in the NFL[264]
Wallace TriplettGamma NuNFL player, First African-American to be drafted into and play in the NFL[289]
Gene UpshawGamma Chi LambdaNFL and AFL player; 1987 Pro Football Hall of Fame; President of National Football League Players Association (NFLPA); NFLPA Headquarters building in Washington D.C. named in his honor.[20]
Kenny WashingtonAlpha DeltaOne of the first two African-Americans to play in the NFL's modern (post-World War II) era, College Football Hall of Fame[235]
Raymond WebberGamma DeltaNFL player, Tampa Bay Buccaneers[253]
Aron WhiteZeta PiNFL Player, Atlanta Falcons[290]
Gerald WilliamsOmicron KappaNFL player 11 seasons in the NFL[291]
J. Mayo WilliamsXi LambdaNFL player, One of the first African Americans to play professional football, also acclaimed recording artist elected to the Blues Hall of Fame[292]
Reggie WilliamsTheta ZetaNFL player; 2007 College Football Hall of Fame Inductee; 1986 NFL Man of the Year; 1987 Sports Illustrated Co-Sportsman of the Year; former Cincinnati City Councilman[293][294]
Claudius WrightZeta ThetaNFL player[264]
Eric WrightZeta AlphaNFL player, 2 time Pro Bowl player[40]
Jason WrightAlpha MuNFL player[235]
Donald Driver
Rosey Grier
Paul Robeson

Other Athletics[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
JC CuffeeIota AlphaProfessional MMA mixed martial arts fighter[295]
Gerald HarrisPiProfessional MMA mixed martial arts fighter. The Ultimate Fighter (UFC), FCF, TFC, and International Fight League[296][297]
Abongo HumphreyGamma PhiProfessional MMA mixed martial arts fighter. Strikeforce
Nassor Lewis"unknown"Professional MMA mixed martial arts fighter, Gladiator Challenge, King of the Cage[298]
Eulace PeacockPi Rhomember of the National Track and Field Hall of Fame. Most known as a rival of Jesse Owens[299]
Willis WardEpsilonUniversity of Michigan Athletic Hall of Fame, second African American to letter in varsity football at Michigan, 3 time track & field All-American and 8 time Big Ten champion, famous for being excluded from 1934 Michigan vs Georgia Tech football game due to being African American[265]

Other Alphas[edit]

NameOriginal chapterNotabilityReferences
Raymond CannonMuFirst Editor of The Sphinx, the official publication of Alpha Phi Alpha; 12th General President of Alpha Phi Alpha[12][27]
Henry MintonRhoCo-founder of Sigma Pi Phi fraternity; co-founder of Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia; 1891 Valedictorian of Phillips Exeter Academy[49][300]
Hilyard RobinsonEtaArchitect, Designed buildings for Howard University, Hampton University and Langston Terrace Dwellings in Washington, D.C.; Architect of Tuskegee, Alabama Army Airfield, the first and only African American to design a U.S. Airbase[15]

General Presidents[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Arizona Student Unions". Fraternity and sorority programs. University of Arizona. Archived from the original on 2007-06-18. Retrieved 2007-08-05. 
  2. ^ Wesley 1981, p. v, Preface to the First Edition
  3. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 82
  4. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 122
  5. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 135–136
  6. ^ "Alpha Response to Supreme Court Decision" (Press release). Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Retrieved 2007-07-18. [dead link]
  7. ^ a b Mason, Herman (1999). "James R. Williams". The Talented Tenth: The Founders and Presidents of Alpha. Winter Park, FL: Four-G. ISBN 1-885066-63-5. 
  8. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 273
  9. ^ a b c d "Alpha Phi Alpha Facts". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Epsilon Zeta chapter. Retrieved 2007-08-06. 
  10. ^ Mason, Herman (1999). "The Visionary Jewel—Eugene Kinckle Jones". The Talented Tenth: The Founders and Presidents of Alpha. Winter Park, FL: Four-G. ISBN 1-885066-63-5. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h "Alpha Phi Alpha Founders". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Retrieved 2009-02-10. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "General Presidents of Alpha Phi Alpha". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Retrieved 2009-02-10. 
  13. ^ a b c d e "Virginia Union History". vuu.edu. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  14. ^ Gray, Christopher (1994-04-24). "Streetscapes/The Walker Town House". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2006-10-03. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Notable Members of Mu Lambda". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Mu Lambda chapter. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  16. ^ a b "Herman Branson, sickle cell physicist . . .". African American Registry. Retrieved 2007-07-16. [dead link]
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Staff Writer (2003-09-03). "'Supremes' Founder Mary Wilson To Be Honored By Alpha Phi Alpha". Atlanta Daily World (townnews.com). Retrieved 2007-07-06. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Alpha Phi Alpha Educators". Cornell University. Archived from the original on 2007-07-02. Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  19. ^ a b c "Great Lives in the Law: Julius Chambers Lecture". Duke Law News and Events (Duke University School of law). Retrieved 2007-07-29. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf "Notable Alpha Men". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Mu Lambda chapter. Archived from the original on 2007-10-23. Retrieved 2007-10-12. 
  21. ^ "UMass Amherst Chancellor Search". University of Massachusetts. Archived from the original on 2007-12-30. Retrieved 2008-02-28. 
  22. ^ a b "Alpha Phi Alpha College Presidents". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Retrieved 2007-10-02. [dead link]
  23. ^ a b "Floyd H. Flake Professional Profile". Allen Cathedral. Retrieved 2007-10-20. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f "Alpha Phi Alpha Government Leaders". rso.cornell.edu. Archived from the original on 2007-07-04. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  25. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 402
  26. ^ "A Guide to the Papers of Luther Hilton Foster, 1928-1949". Luther Hilton Foster Papers, Accession number: # 1976-56, Johnston Memorial Library, Virginia State University. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad "Prominent Alphas". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Retrieved 2007-07-30. 
  28. ^ "Dr. Norman C. Francis Receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom". Xavier University. Retrieved 2007-07-28. [dead link]
  29. ^ a b c "Civil rights veterans join Martin Luther King Jr.’s fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha" (Press release). Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. December 2010. Most of you have been walking in the light of Alpha all these years, and now you have finally have made it official. 
  30. ^ Wesley 1969
  31. ^ "George Gore Biographical Information". tristate.edu. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  32. ^ Moore, Waveney Ann (2008-12-08). "Cornelius Henderson, Methodist bishop, dies". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved 2007-07-06. 
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Prominent Initiates of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Beta Chapter". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Beta chapter. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "The Spingarn Medal". spingarn.k12.dc.us. Retrieved 2007-07-28. 
  35. ^ a b "Activist John Hope had a vision. .". aaregistry.com. Retrieved 2007-07-28. [dead link]
  36. ^ a b c "Walking with Giants: The ASALH Presidents". asalh.org. Retrieved 2007-07-31. 
  37. ^ "Delta Lambda Chapter". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Delta Lambda chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  38. ^ "Freeman A. Hrabowski III". The University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Retrieved 2007-07-19. [dead link]
  39. ^ "President's Office". Philander Smith College. Retrieved 2007-07-06. [dead link]
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Famous Alpha Phi Alpha members". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Gamma chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-04. [dead link]
  41. ^ "Significant Events in the Life of Dd. Frederick D. Patterson". United Negro College Fund. Retrieved 2007-07-28. 
  42. ^ a b c Dawson, Horace; Edward Brooke, Henry Ponder, Vinton R. Anderson, Bobby William Austin, Ron Dellums, Kenton Keith, Huel D. Perkins, Charles Rangel, Clathan McClain Ross, and Cornel West (July 2006). "The Centenary Report Of The Alpha Phi Alpha World Policy Council" (PDF). Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Retrieved 2011-05-23. 
  43. ^ "John Brooks Slaughter Biography". biography.jrank.org. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  44. ^ "Historical Highlights". Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  45. ^ The Sphinx magazine Fall 2010 volume95 no.3 pages 57-58
  46. ^ "William Foster papers, 1940-2004". University of Kansas. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  47. ^ "John Hope Franklin, a timeless educator". aaregistry.com. Retrieved 2007-07-19. [dead link]
  48. ^ "Kluge Prize Winners". Library of Congress. 2006. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  49. ^ a b Mason, Herman (1999-05-11). "Sigma Pi Phi: The Boule". Skip's Historical Moments, Number 19. skipmason.com. Retrieved 2008-01-02. 
  50. ^ Ragland, James (2007-12-29). "'Great Debaters' sparks Wiley College's hopes for reinvention". The Dallas Morning News (dallasnews.com). Retrieved 2008-01-02. [dead link]
  51. ^ a b c Mason, Herman (1999-05-25). "Notable Honorary Members". Skip's Historical Moments, Number 24. skipmason.com. Retrieved 2008-01-02. 
  52. ^ "Dr. Kelly Miller: Johns Hopkins University's First Black Student". The History of African Americans form Johns Hopkins University. Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved 13 December 2010. 
  53. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 219
  54. ^ "John Amos Porter". artnoir.com. Archived from the original on 2007-04-09. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  55. ^ Mosaics magazine University of Missouri-Columbia College of Art and Sciences winter 2000 page 28
  56. ^ a b "Faces of Alpha Phi Alpha, Manley". Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  57. ^ a b Burke, Michael (2004-09-04). "Norman Manley and Aloun Assamba". Jamaica Observer. Retrieved 2007-06-30. [dead link]
  58. ^ "Hopkins' Honors Rhodes Scholar". The Gazette Online (Johns Hopkins University). 2001-01-22. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  59. ^ a b "Dr. Randal Pinkett, Affiliations". Retrieved 2007-10-12. 
  60. ^ a b "The Apprentice". NBC. Retrieved 2007-10-12. 
  61. ^ a b c "Alpha Phi Alpha Business Leaders". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Tau Alpha chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  62. ^ "Bike tour of historic neighborhoods". Atlanta Daily World (townnews.com). Retrieved 2007-07-15. 
  63. ^ a b c "17th House of Alpha". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Sigma chapter,. Retrieved 2007-07-04. 
  64. ^ "Celebration Of The Life Of John H. Johnson 1918-2005" (PDF). Funeral Program. johnpublishing.com. p. 3. Retrieved 2007-07-23. 
  65. ^ Sphinx magazine, Spring 2003 pg.14-15, Volume 88, No.1
  66. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Alpha Phi Alpha Politicians". Retrieved 2007-06-07. 
  67. ^ a b "New York Times v. Sullivan". findlaw.com. Retrieved 2007-07-04. 
  68. ^ Staff Writer (2004-11-04). "Samuel Pierce Jr., housing secretary in Reagan era". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 2007-07-04. 
  69. ^ "Johnathan Rodgers Biography". jrank.com. 2006-11-17. Retrieved 2007-10-12. 
  70. ^ "Ebony Magazine's "Power 150"" (Press release). May 2008. Retrieved June 7, 2009. Alpha continues to stand as the organization that represents the totality of the Black male... 
  71. ^ a b c d e f g h "Alpha Phi Alpha Entertainers". Cornell University. Retrieved 2007-07-03. [dead link]
  72. ^ "Duke Ellington–Composer, Pianist and Jazz Bandleader". dclibrary.org. Archived from the original on 2007-07-09. Retrieved 2007-07-28. 
  73. ^ a b "Lionel Hampton: His Life and Legacy". Alpha University of Idaho. Retrieved 2007-07-30. 
  74. ^ "Donny Hathaway biography". soulwalking.co.uk. Retrieved 2007-07-23. 
  75. ^ Mason, Herman (1999-04-29). "Our Brother Duke Ellington would have been 100 years old today!". Skips Historical Moments, Number 11. skipmason.com. Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  76. ^ "Hip Hop U-C-IT". Retrieved 2014-03-23. 
  77. ^ "Lionel Richie biography". imdb.co. Retrieved 2007-07-23. 
  78. ^ "Martin L. King Jr. Holiday Exclusive: How a Historic Photo Serves as Inspiration for Writer of 'Stomp The Yard' Gregory Anderson". PR Newswire (Empire Broadcasting). 2001-01-10. Retrieved 2007-07-22. [dead link]
  79. ^ "Shuffle Along". The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Retrieved 2007-07-22. [dead link]
  80. ^ "J.L.Kirkwood". Zomobo. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  81. ^ a b "Dreamgirls". Center Theatre Group. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  82. ^ "Todd Duncan biography". America Online. Retrieved 2007-07-20. [dead link]
  83. ^ a b Carter, Amberly R. (February 2007). "Becoming Greek" (PDF). The Drum. Millikin University. p. 3. Retrieved 2007-07-07. [dead link][dead link]
  84. ^ "Kevin Grevioux". IMDB accessdate=7 May 2012. 
  85. ^ Malone, Jacqui (1996). Steppin' on the Blues. Illinois: University of Illinois Press. p. 167. ISBN 9780252065088. 
  86. ^ "Cast of Generation Kill". TV Guide. Retrieved 2008-07-14. 
  87. ^ "Zeta Pi Lines 1990 - 1999". Alpha Phi Alpha, Theta Pi chapter. Retrieved 10 September 2010. [dead link]
  88. ^ "Omari Hardwick biography". AOL. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  89. ^ "Rob Hardy, Filmography". imdb.com. Retrieved 2007-07-07. 
  90. ^ "President Mason sets focus on America's black boys" (Press release). Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. 2009-01-28. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  91. ^ "Fraternity Highlights Activism, Commitment To Improving Community" (Press release). blacknews.com. Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  92. ^ "Next Big Thing: Christian Keyes". A Tru Star. Retrieved 2011-01-08. 
  93. ^ "Alpha Chapter Lineage (1988-2003)". rso.cornell.edu. Retrieved 2007-07-07. [dead link]
  94. ^ "Vaughn Lowery biography". imdb.com. Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  95. ^ Alston, Joshua (2007-01-12). "Stepping Out of Line?". Newsweek Entertainment. msnbc.com. Retrieved 2007-07-07. [dead link][dead link]
  96. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc Tackled the "N-Word"". Blacknews.com. Retrieved 2011-05-15. 
  97. ^ "Tim Reid Initiated". The Sphinx (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) 95 (3): 35. Fall 2010. 
  98. ^ a b c "Biography for Paul Robeson". imdb.com. Retrieved 2007-07-15. 
  99. ^ "Kareem Taylor biography". IMDb. Retrieved 2013-01-16. 
  100. ^ "Biography For Terrell Tilford". IMDb. Retrieved 2012-01-20. 
  101. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 453–454
  102. ^ "HUMPHREY, Hubert Horatio, Jr., (1911 - 1978)". United States Congress. Retrieved 29 February 2012. 
  103. ^ "Remarks at the Presentation Ceremony of the Congressional Gold Medal Honoring Hubert H. Humphrey". University of Texas. Retrieved 29 February 2012. 
  104. ^ "Thurgood Marshall". africanamericans.com. Retrieved 2007-07-28. [dead link]
  105. ^ "Press Briefing by Drug Control Director Lee Brown" (Press release). William J. Clinton Foundation. 1994-02-09. Retrieved 2007-07-04. Our belief is that supply and demand are equally important and, therefore, they should not be competing with each other. [dead link]
  106. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 481–482
  107. ^ "Executive Office of the President". nixonfoundation.org. Retrieved 2007-08-02. 
  108. ^ Peppers, Todd. "William Thaddeus Coleman, Jr.: Breaking the Color Barrier at the U.S. Supreme Court". 
  109. ^ a b Mason, Herman (1999). "Rayford Wittingham Logan". The Talented Tenth: The Founders and Presidents of Alpha. Winter Park, FL: Four-G. ISBN 1-885066-63-5. 
  110. ^ "Former senator awarded Congressional Gold Medal". CNN (TBS). 28 October 2009. Retrieved 5 October 2010. He ran for office, as he put it, to bring people together who had never been together before, and that he did. 
  111. ^ "The Honorable Roland Burris". Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. Retrieved 2007-07-05. [dead link]
  112. ^ Staff Writer (2009-01-15). "Burris sworn in as senator". Chicago Sun-Times (Chicago: Chicago Sun News Group). Associated Press. Retrieved 15 January 2009. [dead link]
  113. ^ "Members of Congress–Emanuel Cleaver". washingtonpost.com. 2006-04-07. Retrieved 2007-07-06. 
  114. ^ a b "U.S. Senate approves resolution" (Press release). Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. 2006-11-06. Retrieved 2008-12-31. Alpha Phi Alpha is an exceptional organization that deserves to be recognized and honored for all of its many great achievements. The fraternity has helped shape more than 175,000 young men into extraordinary leaders who contribute positively to their communities and the world. [dead link]
  115. ^ Heredia, Christopher (2007-01-08). "Dellums sworn in as Oakland mayor". San Francisco Chronicle (Hearst). Retrieved 2007-07-01. 
  116. ^ a b c "Origins and the History of the Congressional Black Caucus". cbcfinc.org. Retrieved 2007-07-04. [dead link]
  117. ^ "Rangel, Charles B.". United States Congress. Retrieved 2007-07-01. 
  118. ^ "Congressman Scott Honors Centennial Anniversary of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity". davidscott.gov. 2006-07-25. Retrieved 2007-07-04. 
  119. ^ a b Fall 2010 volume 95 no.3, page11
  120. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 139,327
  121. ^ "Hall of Famers, Walter Gordon". National Football Foundation. Retrieved 2007-06-30. [dead link]
  122. ^ a b "Alpha Phi Alpha History". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Springfield chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-03. [dead link]
  123. ^ "U.S. Virgin Islands Statesmen". worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  124. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 341,344
  125. ^ "Archibald Carey, Jr., Judge, diplomat, policymaker". Jet (Johnson). 7 August 1995. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  126. ^ Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity (2005). Alpha Phi Alpha Men: A Century of Leadership (Video). Rubicon Productions. 
  127. ^ "Walter C. Carrington". Council of American Ambassadors. americanambassadors.org. Retrieved 2007-07-26. [dead link]
  128. ^ a b "Frederick Douglass: The Hypocrisy of American Slavery, July 4, 1852". Modern History Sourcebook. fordham.edu. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  129. ^ "Delano Lewis". kckps.org. Retrieved 2007-06-30. [dead link]
  130. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 417
  131. ^ "Biographical Sketches of Diversity at Rutgers". Rutgers University. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  132. ^ a b "State Department-T". Retrieved 2007-06-30. [dead link]
  133. ^ a b "Black Politicians in New York". politicalgraveyard.com. Retrieved 2009-01-24. [dead link]
  134. ^ "U.S. Ambassadors to Liberia". state.gov. Retrieved 2009-01-24. [dead link]
  135. ^ "State Department History". state.gov. Retrieved 2007-08-06. [dead link]
  136. ^ "Andrew Young, stateman, businessman, humanitarian". Georgia State University. Retrieved 2007-06-30. [dead link]
  137. ^ Toner, Robin (1990-05-22). "Young as Candidate: Hard Road, Light Touch". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2007-08-17. 
  138. ^ Londin, Jessee. "Dennis Archer". lawcrossing.com. Retrieved 2007-07-06. 
  139. ^ "Alpha's National Convention in D.C.". The Baltimore Afro-American. August 18, 1979. p. 12. 
  140. ^ Wilkinson, Harry. "Theodor M. Barry showed them the way". The Cincinnati Enquirer (Gannett). Retrieved 7 March 2010. 
  141. ^ "Byron W. Brown, Mayor of Buffalo, New York". Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  142. ^ Richardson, James D. "Willie Brown: The Members' Speaker". aliciapatterson.org. Retrieved 2007-07-31. [dead link]
  143. ^ a b c "McGee earns Boy Scouts' top honor at national jamboree/the sphinx winter2011". The Sphinx 96 (1): 52. Winter 2011. 
  144. ^ "About Mayor Harvey Johnson, Jr.". Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  145. ^ Jim Schaffer; M.L. Elrick, Joe Swickard and Ben Schmitt (2008-09-05). "Kilpatrick admits guilt, resigns". Freep.com (Gannett). Retrieved 2008-09-05. 
  146. ^ Paul, Caron (2013-03-11). "Ex-Detroit Mayor Kilpatrick convicted in corruption case". cnn.com (Turner Broadcasting System). Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  147. ^ a b "Marc H. Morial, President and CEO". National Urban League. Archived from the original on 2007-06-26. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  148. ^ "MS-322 James H. McGee Papers". Special Collection and Archives. Wright State University. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  149. ^ "Judge Joe Brown". Tavis Smiley. pbs.org. 2004-01-16. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  150. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 313,404,467
  151. ^ Staff Writer. "Judge Robert L. Carter Honored by Phi Alpha Delta". Brooklyn Law School. Retrieved 2007-07-18. [dead link]
  152. ^ "Christopher Dardern biography" (PDF). wma.com. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  153. ^ "Milton C. Davis, Attorney at Law, Tuskegee, Alabama". Tuskegee University. 2004-04-08. Retrieved 2008-01-06. [dead link]
  154. ^ Wormser, Richard. "Charles Hamilton Houston". Jim Crow Stories. pbsorg. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  155. ^ "Harry Johnson". Tavis Smiley. pbs.org. 2007-04-16. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  156. ^ "Summary Biography The Honorable Damon J. Keith". Retrieved 17 May 2010. [dead link]
  157. ^ "New Negro Alliance's Sanitary Grocery Protest Site". culturaltourismdc.org. Archived from the original on 2007-03-11. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  158. ^ Warikoo, Niraj (2006-03-31). "Dearborn to host Alpha Phi Alpha meeting" (PDF). Detroit Free Press (freep.com). Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  159. ^ "Judge Mathis". imdb.com. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  160. ^ Selah, Makkada B. "Justice for Trayvon: Attorney Daryl Parks Speaks". Ebony (Johnson Publishing). Retrieved 2014-08-17. 
  161. ^ a b Wesley 1981, pp. 298,301,304,306–307,309,323,344
  162. ^ a b Hevesi, Dennis (2006-09-07). "Jawn Sandifer, Civil Rights Lawyer, Dies at 92". Obituaries (The New York Times). Retrieved 2007-07-27. 
  163. ^ for Judicial Nominees[dead link]
  164. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 283,307,367,373,377,385,447
  165. ^ "Arthur Davis Shores—Biography". Alabama Bar Association. Retrieved 2008-01-06. [dead link]
  166. ^ "Beta Tau Chapter History". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Beta Tau chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-19. [dead link]
  167. ^ "Garner v. Louisiana, 368 U.S. 157 (1961)". supreme.justia.com. Retrieved 2007-10-04. 
  168. ^ "Documentary Chronicles Efforts of First African-American To Sue For Admission to UGA" (Press release). University Community News Bureau of the University of Georgia. 2000-02-11. Retrieved 2007-07-28. [dead link]
  169. ^ "Support of Alpha Brothers Campaigning For Senate and Congressional Seats" (PDF). The Sphinx (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) 87 (3): 19. Fall 2002. Retrieved 2007-12-26. [dead link]
  170. ^ "Juneteenth U.S.A Holdiay Thanks to Texas State Representative Al Edwards". texasjuneteenthusa.com. Retrieved 2007-07-18. [dead link]
  171. ^ "Eye on Albany Campaign 2002". Gotham Gazette. Retrieved 2007-07-01. 
  172. ^ "History of Gamma Phi Lambda". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Phi Lambda chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-05. [dead link]
  173. ^ "Black Politicians in California". politicalgraveyard.com. Retrieved 2007-07-05. [dead link]
  174. ^ Howell, Ron (November 1997). "Al Vann and the Revolution unplugged". City Limits (City Futures). Retrieved 28 February 2012. Coming out of my role in the sixties, it was understood that the role of the politician was to help build institutions. 
  175. ^ "Lincoln University Presents 143rd Commencement" (Press release). Lincoln University. 2002-04-26. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  176. ^ "Tyrone K. Yates". Ohio House of Representatives. Retrieved June 7, 2009. [dead link]
  177. ^ "PLP Party". PLP1. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  178. ^ "OBA Party". OBA. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  179. ^ "PLP Party". PLP2. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  180. ^ "Bermuda Government". Bermuda-Island.net. Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  181. ^ a b "PLP Party". PLP1. Retrieved 2012-11-06. 
  182. ^ "Penn Careers" (PDF). college.upenn.edu. Retrieved 2007-11-11. [dead link]
  183. ^ Staff Writer (2007-04-10). "Ron Allen NBC News Correspondent". msnbc.com. Retrieved 2007-07-14. 
  184. ^ Prince, Richard (2004-07-20). "Tony Brown Named Hampton J-School Dean". Richard Prince's Journal-isms (Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education). Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-07-29. 
  185. ^ "Annual ODU NPHC Events and Programs" (PDF). studentaffairs.odu.edu. Retrieved 2007-12-05. [dead link]
  186. ^ Lidington, James J. (Fall 2003). "News Anchor Makes The Jump To ESPN". Old Dominion University Magazine 5 (1). Retrieved 2007-12-05. 
  187. ^ "Sports Broadcasters and Writers". Greeks in Sports. North-American Interfraternity Conference. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  188. ^ "Roland S. Martin". creators.com. Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  189. ^ "The Pi Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.". www.thepotentpio.com. Retrieved 2010-06-20. 
  190. ^ Brock, Paul (2004-07-28). "Chuck Stone". nabj.org. Retrieved 2007-07-20. [dead link]
  191. ^ Staff Writer (2006-10-25). "Chuck Stone, former Tuskegee Airman, to speak at UNC Veterans Day ceremony" (Press release). The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  192. ^ This Week's Census. Jet Magazine. 11 October 1962. p. 28. ISSN 0021-5996. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  193. ^ Martin Luther King Jr. (27 February 1997). The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr.: Volume III: Birth of a New Age, December 1955-December 1956. University of California Press. p. 119. ISBN 978-0-520-07952-6. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  194. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha". Archived from the original on 2007-03-11. Retrieved 2013-01-28. Chester Himes, Kappa, (Ohio State University), Author 
  195. ^ "Bro. Brewer newest Navy Admiral". The Sphinx 79 (1): 4. Spring 1994. 
  196. ^ "The Untold Story of Leonard Braithwaite". Ontario Black History Society. Retrieved 2007-07-22. [dead link]
  197. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha and the Great War". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity: A Centennial Celebration. Cornell University Library. Retrieved 2007-08-17. 
  198. ^ "Gaskin Marks One Year At NATO". The Sphinx 96 (1): 10. Winter 2011. 
  199. ^ Curry, George E. (2003-04-23). "Success of Brooks Brothers Caps Long Struggle at West Point". georgecurry.com. Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  200. ^ "Pi Upsilon Lambda Chapter History". Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  201. ^ a b c d e f "Alpha Phi Alpha Religious Leaders". Cornell University. Archived from the original on 2007-07-01. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  202. ^ "Rev. Tyrone Crider, former national director of Operation PUSH, is speaker Jan. 19" (Press release). Perdue University Calumet. 2005-12-28. Retrieved 2007-07-23. 
  203. ^ "This Far By Faith, Witnesses to Faith". Public Broadcasting Service. Retrieved 2007-07-30. 
  204. ^ a b "Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.". africanamericans.com. Retrieved 2007-07-28. [dead link]
  205. ^ Staff Writer (2004-02-24). "James P. Copmer, Yale University Child Psychiatrist, to Give Keynote Address at march 26 Conference / Bryn Mawr Now". Bryn Mawr College. Retrieved 2007-07-23. 
  206. ^ "Lloyd Augustus Hall biography". library.thinkquest.org. Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  207. ^ "Garrett Morgan biography". blackinventor.com. Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  208. ^ "Earl Wiley Renfroe obituary". arlingtoncemetery.net. Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  209. ^ The Sphinx Magazine Fall 2004 volume 89 number 1 page75
  210. ^ Tabscott, Robert W. (2007-03-03). "In 1938, Lloyd Gaines was poised to become a major figure in the desegregation of America. But then he vanished.". Post-Dispatch (STLtoday.com). Retrieved 2007-07-22. [dead link]
  211. ^ "Dick Gregory, For the People". africanamericans.com. Retrieved 2007-07-06. [dead link]
  212. ^ "History of the National Urban League". nul.org. Archived from the original on 2007-07-07. Retrieved 2007-07-14. 
  213. ^ "Talkin' about that Epsilon Chi". University of Kentucky. Retrieved 2007-10-12. [dead link][dead link]
  214. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 110,149,154,157
  215. ^ "Jesse Moorland, civic leader and much more!". aaregistry.com. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-07-14. 
  216. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha Celebrates 100". Black Issues Forum (UNC-TV). Retrieved 2007-07-18. [dead link]
  217. ^ "Floyd McKissick, former CORE director". aaregistry.com. Retrieved 2007-07-19. [dead link]
  218. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha members honored with the Congressional Gold Medal". Copy Line News Magazine. 2012-06-27. Retrieved 2012-07-21. 
  219. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 281,294,303,313
  220. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 149,154–155,165,238,276–277,307.338,346
  221. ^ "Civil rights veterans join Martin Luther King Jr.'s fraternity; Alpha Phi Alpha holds initiation ceremony in Atlanta". Alpha Phi Alpha. 10 December 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-21. 
  222. ^ "Wyatt Tee Walker Leader of SCLC". blackseek.com. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  223. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 148,239
  224. ^ "Alfred Bitini Xuma ANC President 1940-1949". anc.org.za. Archived from the original on 2007-06-30. Retrieved 2007-07-14. 
  225. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 277
  226. ^ Rappaport, Scott (2006-03-20). "New book explores black activist's political odyssey". U.C. Santa Cruz. Currents (UC Santa Cruz Public Affairs Office). Retrieved 2007-07-14. 
  227. ^ Kelly, John F. (2005-04-21). "Bridges Carry Bits of History Along With the Traffic". Washington Post. Retrieved 2007-07-02. 
  228. ^ Wesley 1981, p. 231
  229. ^ a b c d e "1980-1989 Lineage of Gamma Xi chapter". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Gamma Xi chapter. Retrieved 2008-01-30. 
  230. ^ a b "Don Barksdale". hoopedia.nba.com. Retrieved 2008-02-10. [dead link]
  231. ^ "Walt Bellamy". The Sphinx (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) 84 (2): 51. Spring 1999. 
  232. ^ a b "Quinn Buckner, Cable TV Color Analyst". NBA Media Ventures. Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  233. ^ "Olympic Medal Winners". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 2008-08-19. 
  234. ^ a b c "Alpha Men Leave A Legacy of Olympic Greatness". Alpha Phi Alpha. Retrieved 2012-02-18. 
  235. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Alpha Phi Alpha Athletes". Cornell University. Archived from the original on 2007-06-20. Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  236. ^ Brown, Tamara L.; Gregory Parks; Clarenda M. Phillips (2005). African American Fraternities and Sororities: The Legacy and the Vision (1st ed.). Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. p. 256. ISBN 0-8131-2344-5. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  237. ^ Dean, Amy (2002-02-12). "Edward Gourdin: Olympic silver medalist, but a man of firsts". B.U. Bridge (Boston, Massachusetts: Boston University). Retrieved 2009-02-19. 
  238. ^ "AE Lineage". Alpha Phi Alpha AE Chapter. Retrieved 2012-06-26. 
  239. ^ a b c d e Myers II, Michael J. (Fall–Winter 2008). "Alpha Athletes at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany". The Sphinx (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and SJW Publishers) 93 (3–4). Retrieved January 13, 2010. 
  240. ^ Wesley 1981, pp. 231,481
  241. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha Member Manteo Mitchell Breaks His Leg in Olympic 4x400m Relay Race". Kollege Kid. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  242. ^ "Epsilon History". Alpha Phi Alpha Epsilon Chapter. Retrieved 2012-02-16. 
  243. ^ "Who is Jesse Owens?". The Jesse Owens Foundation. Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  244. ^ a b "1996 USA Men's Olympic Team Head Coach". The Washington Post (washingtonpost.com). Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  245. ^ "Kevin Young: Always in the Trenches". hurdlesfirst.com. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  246. ^ "Walt Bellamy". The Sphinx (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) 84 (2): 51. Spring 1999. 
  247. ^ "The Lineage of Kappa Kappa". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Kappa Kappa chapter. Retrieved 2008-01-20. 
  248. ^ "Basketball Midnight Madness Activities". Arizona Razorbacks Sports Network. KATV. 2004-10-08. Retrieved 2008-01-30. 
  249. ^ Rodriguez, Codell (2011-02-02). "Wild About Walt". The Southern.Com. Retrieved 2011-05-13. 
  250. ^ a b "Alpha Athletes Saluted". The Sphinx (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) 95 (3): 20. Fall 2010. 
  251. ^ Loving, James (2003-07-23). "Karl Malone and Gary Payton Sign With Lakers". National Radio. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 
  252. ^ ""greeks" In The Nba". Pinoy Fraternity. Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  253. ^ a b c d e "Greeks In Pro Football 2010". Greeks in News. North-American Interfraternity Conference. Retrieved 2011-11-06. 
  254. ^ a b c "Mu Chapter Line History". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Mu chapter. Archived from the original on 2004-03-07. Retrieved 2007-12-16. 
  255. ^ "Pro Football Hall of Fame–Bobby Bell". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2007-12-16. 
  256. ^ "Epsilon Chapter History". Alpha Phi Alpha, Epsilon chapter. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  257. ^ a b c d e "NIC Greeks in Professional Football 2007". Greeks in Sports. North-American Interfraternity Conference. Retrieved 2007-11-25. 
  258. ^ "University Archives & Historical Collections". 1930s-1950s. MSU. Retrieved 2012-05-16. 
  259. ^ "Marco Coleman". Retrieved 2011-09-02. 
  260. ^ a b c "The History of the Pi Mu Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Pi Mu chapter. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  261. ^ a b c "Greek News/Three Greeks Waiting To Hear Hall Of Fame News". North-American Interfraternity Conference. Retrieved 2011-09-02. 
  262. ^ "Mel Farr–biography". thehistorymakers.com. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  263. ^ "Mike Farr–Fantasy Football Stats and Player Profile". fantasyplaymakers.com. Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  264. ^ a b c d e f g Mason, Herman (1999-06-10). "Brothers in the National Football League". Skips Historical Moments, Number 29. skipmason.com. Retrieved 2008-01-02. 
  265. ^ a b "Epsilon Chapter History". Alpha Phi Alpha, Epsilon chapter. Retrieved 2012-02-16. 
  266. ^ a b "Lineage of Theta Sigma chapter". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Theta Sigma chapter. Retrieved 10 September 2010. [dead link]
  267. ^ "Derrick Gaffney–Fantasy Football Stats & Player Profiles". fantasyplaymakers.com. Retrieved 2008-02-13. 
  268. ^ a b "Past Lines of Alpha Xi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Xi chapter. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  269. ^ "Seattle Seahawks–Nesby Glasgow". NFL.com. Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  270. ^ "Sammy Green Was There". beckys-place.com. Retrieved 2008-02-13. 
  271. ^ "Rosey Grier biography". nndb.com. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  272. ^ "List of Alpha Phi Alpha Brothers". Wikiproject. Retrieved 2012-12-12. [dead link]
  273. ^ "The 337th House of Alpha". Alpha Phi Alpha, Zeta Zeta Chapter. 2010. Retrieved 2012-03-24. 
  274. ^ "Prominent Brothers". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Delta Xi chapter. Retrieved 2 September 2011. 
  275. ^ "Mind Blog:Men are from Mars". Retrieved 25 January 2013. 
  276. ^ "The Demetrious Johnson Charitable Foundation holds first graduation for GED program". Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  277. ^ "Ron Johnson Succeeds Jon Hanson as NFF Chairman". collegefootball.org. 2006-04-17. Retrieved 2008-02-13. [dead link]
  278. ^ "Lewis Kelly". nfl.com. Retrieved 2013-07-31. 
  279. ^ "Reggie Kelly". ReggieKelly.com. Retrieved 2011-12-28. 
  280. ^ "Mark Lee". databasefootball.com. Retrieved 2008-01-30. 
  281. ^ "Ronald More Video". OMV. Retrieved 2012-02-21. [dead link]
  282. ^ "Vincent newsome". baltimoreravens.com. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  283. ^ "Roman Oben". buccaneers.com. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  284. ^ "Greeks from NIC member fraternities highlighted in the news". Greeks in News. North-American Interfraternity Conference. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  285. ^ Rossi, Bob (2005-10-09). "Bigger than Big Ben". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (Tribune-Review). Retrieved 10 September 2010. 
  286. ^ "The Sandy Stephens Story". sandystephens.org. Archived from the original on 2007-08-09. Retrieved 2007-12-16. 
  287. ^ Lewis, Jason (2011-02-09). "Black History Month: Pioneering Blacks in Professional Football". Los Angeles Sentinel. Retrieved May 13, 2011. 
  288. ^ The Michigan Alumnus: His Fraternity Honors Billy Taylor. The University Of Michigan Libraries vol 77-78. Retrieved October 22, 2014. 
  289. ^ Boyer, Lauren (2009-02-15). "We Play All Or None: Triplett, PSU helped change history". Centre Daily Times. Retrieved January 5, 2009. 
  290. ^ "Former Bruin Named To Allstate Good Works Team". Komu.com. Retrieved 2012-08-05. 
  291. ^ "ICE OK Auburn Alphas". Alpha Phi Alpha, Omicron Kappa Chapter. Retrieved 2012-02-21. 
  292. ^ Lentz, Eddie (2004). "J. Mayo Williams". Hepstrack.com. Retrieved January 6, 2011. 
  293. ^ "Alpha Spotlight–Reggie Williams". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Theta Zeta chapter. Retrieved June 27, 2009. 
  294. ^ "Dartmouth's Reggie Williams Selected for College Football Hall of Fame". dartmouthsports.com (Dartmouth College). May 9, 2007. Retrieved June 27, 2009. 
  295. ^ "JC "Concrete" Cuffee". Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  296. ^ Milojevic, Mica. "Gerald Harris, CSU wrestler, works hard on the mat and in life". The Cleveland Slater (Cleveland State University). Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  297. ^ "No Holds Barred: Gerald Harris". Outhink Media and Drupal. Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  298. ^ Chustz-Parent, Angela (2009-11-16). "MMA and Boxing at the SU mini-dome". 2theadvocate. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  299. ^ "Eulace Peacock". The Afro American. Retrieved 2012-06-17. 
  300. ^ "Henry McKee Minton, M.D". Thomas Jefferson University. Retrieved January 11, 2010. 
House of Alpha

GOODWILL is the monarch of this house. Men, unacquainted, enter, shake hands, exchange greetings, and depart friends. Cordiality exists among all who abide within.

I am the eminent expression of friendship. Character and temperament change under my dominant power. Lives once touched by me become tuned, and are thereafter, amiable, kindly, fraternal.

I inspire the musician to play noble sentiments, and assist the chemist to convert ungenerous personalities into individuals of great worth. I destroy all ignoble impulses. I constantly invoke principles which make for common brotherhood, and the echo resounds in all communities, and princely men are thereby recognized. Education, health, music, encouragement, sympathy, laughter—all these are species of interest given on self-invested capital.

Tired moments find me a delightful treat, hours of sorrow, a shrine of understanding—at all times I am faithful to the creed of companionship.

To a few, I am the castle of dreams—ambitious, successful, hopeful dreams. To many, I am the poetic palace where human feeling is rhymed to celestial motives; to the great majority, I am the treasury of good fellowship.

In fact, I am the college of friendship; the university of brotherly love; the school for the better making of men.

I AM ALPHA PHI ALPHA!

Sydney P. Brown

References[edit]

This section lists printed references used for this article. For inline citations, see citations above.

External links[edit]