Lisbon, Ohio

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Lisbon, Ohio
Village
The town square, with the Columbiana County courthouse in the background
The town square, with the Columbiana County courthouse in the background
Nickname(s): Home
Location of Lisbon, Ohio
Location of Lisbon, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°46′26″N 80°46′3″W / 40.77389°N 80.76750°W / 40.77389; -80.76750Coordinates: 40°46′26″N 80°46′3″W / 40.77389°N 80.76750°W / 40.77389; -80.76750
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyColumbiana
Government
 • MayorMichael B. Lewis
Area[1]
 • Total1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
 • Land1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2]968 ft (295 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total2,821
 • Estimate (2012[4])2,783
 • Density1,669.2/sq mi (644.5/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code44432
Area code(s)330, 234
FIPS code39-44030[5]
GNIS feature ID1065006[2]
Websitehttp://www.lisbonvillage.com/
 
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For the community in Clark County, see Lisbon, Clark County, Ohio.
Lisbon, Ohio
Village
The town square, with the Columbiana County courthouse in the background
The town square, with the Columbiana County courthouse in the background
Nickname(s): Home
Location of Lisbon, Ohio
Location of Lisbon, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°46′26″N 80°46′3″W / 40.77389°N 80.76750°W / 40.77389; -80.76750Coordinates: 40°46′26″N 80°46′3″W / 40.77389°N 80.76750°W / 40.77389; -80.76750
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyColumbiana
Government
 • MayorMichael B. Lewis
Area[1]
 • Total1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
 • Land1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2]968 ft (295 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total2,821
 • Estimate (2012[4])2,783
 • Density1,669.2/sq mi (644.5/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code44432
Area code(s)330, 234
FIPS code39-44030[5]
GNIS feature ID1065006[2]
Websitehttp://www.lisbonvillage.com/

Lisbon is a village in Center Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, United States. The population was 2,821 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Columbiana County.[6]

History[edit]

Lisbon was first settled by immigrants coming from Pennsylvania and parts of Europe in the early 19th century and was named after the Portuguese capital city of Lisbon. The seat of justice of Columbia County was originally known as New Lisbon, and under the latter name was laid out in 1803 by Lewis Kinney.[7] New Lisbon was incorporated as a village in 1825.[8]

It is the location of the first Ohio newspaper, The Ohio Patriot, founded by an Alsatian immigrant, William D. Lepper.[9] Lisbon has the distinction of being the northernmost western town involving military actions during the American Civil War. Confederate cavalry officer John Hunt Morgan surrendered to Union forces near here at the end of his raid into Indiana and Ohio.[10]

Among the notable natives of Lisbon (then New Lisbon) was Civil War general William T. H. Brooks, who commanded a division in the Army of the Potomac during the Siege of Petersburg in 1864. Marcus Hanna, US Senator from Ohio and noted as an advisor and confidant of President William McKinley, was born in Lisbon in 1837.

Geography[edit]

Lisbon is located at 40°46′26″N 80°46′3″W / 40.77389°N 80.76750°W / 40.77389; -80.76750 (40.773874, -80.767553).[11]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.69 square miles (4.38 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18902,278
19003,33046.2%
19103,084−7.4%
19203,1130.9%
19303,4059.4%
19403,379−0.8%
19503,293−2.5%
19603,5798.7%
19703,521−1.6%
19803,159−10.3%
19903,037−3.9%
20002,788−8.2%
20102,8211.2%
Est. 20122,783−1.3%
source:[12]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,821 people, 1,138 households, and 693 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,669.2 inhabitants per square mile (644.5 /km2). There were 1,287 housing units at an average density of 761.5 per square mile (294.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.4% White, 1.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population.

There were 1,138 households of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.1% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 3.00.

The median age in the village was 39.6 years. 23.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.3% were from 25 to 44; 28.1% were from 45 to 64; and 15.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 47.3% male and 52.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 2,788 people, 1,133 households, and 696 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,521.1 people per square mile (969.8/km²). There were 1,253 housing units at an average density of 1,133.0 per square mile (435.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.74% White, 0.90% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.61% of the population.

There were 1,133 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.5% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the village the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $27,841, and the median income for a family was $36,707. Males had a median income of $29,271 versus $19,826 for females. The per capita income for the village was $14,097. About 10.1% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.4% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Lisbon's education system begins at the McKinley Elementary School in downtown Lisbon. The school originally started out as a K-6 school but has since became a K-5 school starting with the 2006-2007 school year. The high school, Lisbon David Anderson Jr. Sr. High School, is located uptown. It was renovated for the 2006-2007 school year.

The school's athletic teams are known as the Blue Devils. The most heavily followed athletic programs at Lisbon's high school are football and basketball. Most notable is Lisbon's 1995 Division V State Championship in football, the only such championship in that sport ever to be held by a Columbiana County school. The high school also features a relatively prominent golf program. Other sports include track, swimming, cross country, baseball, softball, volleyball, and cheerleading.

Just east of Lisbon is the Beaver Local School District main campus and Columbiana County Career and Technical Center.

Culture[edit]

The Dulci-More Festival, a music festival dedicated to the Appalachian dulcimer and other traditional musical instruments, was inaugurated in 1995 and takes place each Memorial Day weekend at Camp McKinley, a Boy Scout camp near Lisbon.[13]Lisbon also is the host city to the Columbiana County Johnny Appleseed festival.

Popular culture[edit]

Bon Iver has a song titled "Lisbon, OH" on their self-titled 2011 album.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ McCord, William B. (1905). History of Columbiana County, Ohio and Representative Citizens. Biographical Publishing Company. p. 269. 
  8. ^ Mack, Horace (1879). History of Columbiana County, Ohio: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Unigraphic. p. 107. 
  9. ^ Robert E. Cazden (1998). "The German Book Trade In Ohio Before 1848". Ohio History 84: 57–77. 
  10. ^ Mahoning Valley Civil War Round Table
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-01-20. 
  13. ^ http://billschillingmusic.googlepages.com/festival.htm

External links[edit]