Life Line Screening

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Life Line Screening
TypeCompany limited by guarantee
IndustryHealthcare
Founded1993
HeadquartersIndependence, Cleveland, U.S.
Key peopleColin Scully, CEO
 
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Life Line Screening
TypeCompany limited by guarantee
IndustryHealthcare
Founded1993
HeadquartersIndependence, Cleveland, U.S.
Key peopleColin Scully, CEO

Life Line Screening is a privately run health screening company founded in Cleveland, USA in 1993. The company, which operates out of the USA[1] and United Kingdom, operate community-based preventative screening services for a range of health issues and is the largest provider of mobile screening services in the USA.[2]

Contents

Background

The company was founded in Florida in 1993 by Colin Scully and Timothy Phillips. The service has since expanded across the USA and the United Kingdom.

Operations

Worldwide, the company has conducted over 6 million health screenings since it began, and now conducts over 1 million screenings per year, which include ultrasound scans, blood screenings and electrocardiographs. Common diseases that may be detected by such screenings include Atrial fibrillation, Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).

There are over 16,000 local community events per year which provide these screening services. Normally, Life Line Screening charges a fee for their services. A number of quality studies has been conducted in order to validate the screening methods used by organisations including the University of South Florida.

Life Line Screening launched their services in the UK in 2007.

Partnerships

Life Line Screening is partnered with numerous insurance companies and organizations, such as Ameriplan and Women in Technology International.

Criticism

There has been significant debate within the United Kingdom as to the necessity of private health screenings and other health services due to the existence of a National Health Service which provides such services for free.[3] The counter argument is based around the choice of individuals to pay for health services for convenience or as a means of generating peace of mind.

References

External links