Lewis & Clark Law School

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Lewis & Clark Law School
Lewis and clark college seal.png
MottoExplorare, Discere, Sociare (Latin) To explore, to learn, to work together
Parent schoolLewis & Clark College
Established1915
School typePrivate
Parent endowment$231.2 million[1]
DeanRobert Klonoff
LocationPortland, Oregon, US
45°27′9.01″N 122°40′37.41″W / 45.4525028°N 122.6770583°W / 45.4525028; -122.6770583Coordinates: 45°27′9.01″N 122°40′37.41″W / 45.4525028°N 122.6770583°W / 45.4525028; -122.6770583
Enrollment719[2]
Faculty104[2]
USNWR ranking80[3]
Bar pass rate87%[2]
Websitelaw.lclark.edu
ABA profileLewis & Clark Law School Profile
Lewis & Clark Coat of Arms
 
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Lewis & Clark Law School
Lewis and clark college seal.png
MottoExplorare, Discere, Sociare (Latin) To explore, to learn, to work together
Parent schoolLewis & Clark College
Established1915
School typePrivate
Parent endowment$231.2 million[1]
DeanRobert Klonoff
LocationPortland, Oregon, US
45°27′9.01″N 122°40′37.41″W / 45.4525028°N 122.6770583°W / 45.4525028; -122.6770583Coordinates: 45°27′9.01″N 122°40′37.41″W / 45.4525028°N 122.6770583°W / 45.4525028; -122.6770583
Enrollment719[2]
Faculty104[2]
USNWR ranking80[3]
Bar pass rate87%[2]
Websitelaw.lclark.edu
ABA profileLewis & Clark Law School Profile
Lewis & Clark Coat of Arms

Lewis and Clark Law School (L&C) is a private American law school located in Portland, Oregon.

L&C offers the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree, with optional certificate programs in the following areas: Business Law, Criminal Law, Intellectual Property Law, Environmental and Natural Resources Law, Public Interest Law, Global Law, and Tax Law. The master of laws (L.L.M.) degree is offered in Environmental Law and Animal Law. Located on the Southern end of Portland in the hills west of the Willamette River, Lewis & Clark Law School is associated with Lewis & Clark College.[4]

The school is fully accredited by the American Bar Association.

History[edit]

Lewis & Clark Law School was founded in 1884 when the University of Oregon established a Department of Law in Portland offering evening courses to Oregon residents. In 1915, the Oregon legislature formally moved the University of Oregon School of Law from Portland to Eugene. Some of the school's law faculty in Portland resisted the move and reformed the school as the Northwestern College of Law. In 1965, Northwestern College of Law merged with Lewis & Clark College to form Northwestern School of Law of Lewis & Clark College.[5]

Following this merger, Northwestern's Law Library moved from Portland's Geisey Building to Lewis & Clark College's Aubrey R. Watzek Library. In 1967, L&C's current campus was built beside Lewis & Clark College and Tryon Creek State Park. Boley Library was built that year, and named for Paul L. Boley, a Harvard-trained Portland attorney and long time trustee of the College.[6] By 1973, Boley Library held 69,000 volumes. That same year, Northwestern School of Law of Lewis & Clark College gained full accreditation from the American Bar Association and American Association of Law Schools.

The law school campus has continued to grow. In 2002 the school expanded into a 5th building, Wood Hall, and remodeled Boley Library. The remodel and addition of Wood Hall increased library space from 27,939 square feet to 45,139 square feet, resulting in additional seating and new study venues for students.[6]

Paul L. Boley Law Library[edit]

The Paul L. Boley Law Library is the largest law library in Oregon state [7] and the second largest in the Pacific Northwest [7] with a current collection of over 505,000 volumes. As of Fall 2012, Boley is also home to clinical space and Animal Law offices.[8]

Academics[edit]

Admissions[edit]

The median LSAT score for admitted students is 160, and the median undergraduate GPA is 3.47.[9]

Rankings[edit]

Lewis & Clark Law School

In 2012, the law school was ranked 80th in the United States by the US News and World Report's rating system,[10] making it the highest ranking law school in Oregon and the 2nd highest-ranking law school in the Pacific Northwest. The Environmental Law Program was ranked 2nd nationwide.[11] Lewis & Clark's Legal Writing Program ranks 15th in the country as of 2012. The Intellectual Property Program was ranked 24th in 2011. Students interested in Business Law or Intellectual Property benefit from L&C's nationally recognized Small Business Legal Clinic.[12]

Programs[edit]

Lewis and Clark Law School's varying academic programs are bolstered by affiliated interest groups, societies, and mentoring programs. J.D. students can pursue certification in one of eight areas: Business Law, Criminal Law, Tax Law, Intellectual Property Law, International Law, Environmental Law, Animal Law, and Public Interest Law.[13]

Environmental Law Program[edit]

The Environmental Law (e-law) program is a high-profile academic program. Unofficially, the courses offered derive into two general areas: pollution control and natural resources management. Pollution-control courses tend to focus on regulation of industrial waste products. Natural-resource-management courses tend to involve restrictions on use of land and water to prevent ecological damage.[14] Practical experience in the field of environmental law is developed through a variety of clinics, skills courses, and organizations present on campus. Many of these groups focus on the Pacific Northwest, although any related environmental work of student interest is encouraged. L&C's Environmental Law program was the highest-rated in the United States as recently as 2008.

Earthrise Law Center, formerly Pacific Environmental Advocacy Center (PEAC) and the Northwest Environmental Defense Center (NEDC) are among two organizations hosted at L&C in which students apply practical environmental-law skills. Both groups regularly file motions and negotiate with government, industry, community groups, and other NGO's.[15]

NEDC's staff consists of an Executive Director, four Student Directors and a Law Clerk who manage the daily obligations of the organization. The organization relies heavily on student volunteers. Law students involved with NEDC work on one or more of the organization's project groups, which include: Lands and Wildlife, Water, and Air.[15]

PEAC was founded in 1996, and represents citizen-activists and nonprofit organizations in various areas of environmental and natural resources law. The organization provides students with practical experience in complex environmental litigation and negotiation. PEAC's staff currently consists of six attorneys, an administrative director, and an administrative assistant.[16]

In addition to Earthrise Law Center, the Western Resources Legal Center is a clinical program associated with L&C that provides opportunities to second and third-year law students to represent natural resource dependent entities.[17]

The Animal Law Program is also a subset of the Environmental Law Certificate. Graduates with an Animal Law Certificate from L&C receive a JD with a Certificate in Envr Law emphasizing in Animal Law. This can be a concentration on International endangered wildlife, or a general emphasis. In 2011, L&C hosted the international Animal Law Conference. And in 2012, the school finalized the nation's only Animal Law LLM program.[18]

Public Interest Program[edit]

Lewis & Clark is home to several pro bono campus organizations and two public interest coordinators. The law school encourages pro bono involvement by providing additional honors on the transcripts of students who document 30 or more hours of pro bono legal work, or 30 or more hours of community-service work during the course of the school year.

In addition, the law school is host to the Public Interest Law Project (PILP). PILP was founded by L&C students in 1990 to encourage law students to pursue careers in public interest. It is a funding organization for pro bono legal work done by students and graduating students. The organization also helps graduates of the school establish loan repayment programs for graduates who work in public interest.[19] Each year PILP holds a charity auction and a funding application process in order to provide pay for summer work and loan repayment. In summer 2006, 18 students were provided with a summer stipend for legal work. The annual auction, combined with other fundraising, typically provides stipends to 10 to 15 students per summer.[19]

For the past 7 years, Lewis & Clark law students and alumni have participated in the annual Rose Festival dragon boat races on the Willamette River sponsored by the Portland-Kaohsiung Sister City Association. The school's dragon boat team is named "Scales of Justice."[20]

Law reviews[edit]

Lewis & Clark hosts three law reviews, which are edited and reviewed by law student staff. Publications include:

Membership on Lewis & Clark's law reviews is limited to students who are at the top of their class or who gain membership through a "write-on" competition held in the summer.[21]

Controversy[edit]

Like many law schools across the country, Lewis & Clark has gained critics for graduating too many students, prioritizing revenue over education quality, and saddling graduates with debt.[22] The saturation of the legal job market is speculated to have been a major factor in the law school's sharp drop in U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of law schools.[23] Lewis & Clark dropped more than 20 points in the rankings.[24] Dean Robert Klonoff, a former class action defense attorney whose salary tops $270,000, has pledged to reduce enrollment because the number of law school graduates far exceeds demand.[22]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ About Lewis & Clark - Quick Facts Lewis & Clark College
  2. ^ a b c Lewis & Clark Law School Official ABA Data
  3. ^ Law - Best Graduate Schools - Education - US News and World Report
  4. ^ http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/northwestern-school-of-law-03134
  5. ^ http://www.lclark.edu/about/history/
  6. ^ a b http://lawlib.lclark.edu/libraryinfo/overview.php
  7. ^ a b https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/SchoolsABAData/SchoolPage/SchoolPage_PDFs/LSAC_LawSchoolDescription/LSAC4384.pdf/
  8. ^ http://lawlib.lclark.edu/updates/?cat=5
  9. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/offices/admissions/who_we_are/entering_class_profile/
  10. ^ Best Graduate Schools: Best Law Schools (Ranked in 2013). U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved April 7, 2013.
  11. ^ Best Graduate Schools: Law Specialty Rankings: Environmental Law. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved July 6, 2011.
  12. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/live/news/11283-lewis-amp-clark-law-programs-earn-high-marks-in%7Cwork=Student%7Cpublisher=Lewis
  13. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/offices/registrar/certificate_programs/
  14. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/programs/environmental_and_natural_resources_law/40yearsofmilestones.php
  15. ^ a b http://law.lclark.edu/centers/northwest_environmental_defense_center/about_nedc/
  16. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/centers/pacific_environmental_advocacy/about_us/
  17. ^ http://www.wrlegal.org/
  18. ^ http://www.llm-guide.com/article/686/lewis-clark-to-start-animal-law-llm-this-fall/
  19. ^ a b http://law.lclark.edu/student_groups/public_interest_law_project/
  20. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/live/news/8112-dragon-boat-team-scales-of-justice
  21. ^ http://law.lclark.edu/academics/whats_what/law_reviews/
  22. ^ a b http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2012/08/lawyers_lost_in_debt_looking_f.html
  23. ^ http://abovethelaw.com/2013/03/responding-to-the-new-u-s-news-rankings-the-parade-of-butthurt-deans-begins-now/2/
  24. ^ http://www.law.com/jsp/nlj/PubArticleNLJ.jsp?id=1202591734021&Major_shakeups_in_the_middle_ranks_of_US_News_law_school_list&slreturn=20130307135511
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External links[edit]