Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks
Directed byGregory Dark
Produced byGregory Dark,
Walter Dark
Written byGregory Dark,
Antonio Passolini (Anthony R. Lovett)
Music byJohnny Powers
CinematographyJunior "Speedy" Bodden
Editing byAlex Craig
Distributed byVCA Pictures
Release dates1985
Running time69 minutes
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks
Directed byGregory Dark
Produced byGregory Dark,
Walter Dark
Written byGregory Dark,
Antonio Passolini (Anthony R. Lovett)
Music byJohnny Powers
CinematographyJunior "Speedy" Bodden
Editing byAlex Craig
Distributed byVCA Pictures
Release dates1985
Running time69 minutes

Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks is an interracial pornographic film from 1985. Like many of the films produced by the Dark Brothers, Gregory Dark and Walter Dark, Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks is controversial. One scene in particular led to the withdrawal of the film from the home video market.[1]

The film begins with four African-American women (Cherry Layme, Lady Stephanie, Purple Passion, and Sahara) lounging in a hotel room. The four are dressed as maids and they discuss sexual encounters they have had with white men (and in one instance with a white woman).[2] Their manner and dialog has been criticized for playing to stereotypes.[3][4]

The biggest controversy surrounding Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks concerns a scene involving Sahara, Steve Powers, and Mark Wallice. The two men are dressed as members of the Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacist organization. When the pair encounter Sahara they say "Let's fuck the shit out of this darky!" and begin a series of racist remarks that continues throughout the scene. Despite the insults, or perhaps because of them, Sahara is portrayed as an enthusiastic participant in the sexual encounter, which includes fellatio and double penetration. In relating the encounter to the other maids, Sahara describes the experience as "too good".[1]

According to script writer Antonio Passolini, the film-makers' intention was to be as politically incorrect as possible.[1] Passolini says that he originally intended to portray Sahara "masturbating to [a] picture of Jesus that she was looking at as she cleaned the altar at a church", but Gregory Dark would not film it that way.[5] Instead, the Klansmen find Sahara masturbating while listening to gospel music.[6] Director Gregory Dark says of the scene, "I had these Klu Klux Klan [sic] guys riding on top of black girls as if they're horses. That scene made me happy."[7]

Cast[edit]

Sahara with Steve Powers and Mark Wallice dressed as Klansmen
Actresses
Actors
  • Dan T. Mann
  • Tony Martino
  • Tony Montana
  • Steve Powers
  • Marc Wallice
  • Ray Wells

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Williams, Linda (2004). "Skin Flicks on the Racial Border: Pornography, Exploitation, and Interracial Lust". In Linda Williams. Porn Studies. Durham: Duke University Press. p. 304. ISBN 0-8223-3312-0. 
  2. ^ Miller-Young, Mireille (2007). "Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks: Black Women in 1980s Video Pornography". In Michelle Wright, Antje Schuhmann. Blackness and Sexualities. Berlin: LIT Verlag. p. 151. ISBN 3-8258-9693-5. 
  3. ^ Rimmer, Robert H. (1991). The X-Rated Videotape Guide II. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books. p. 309. ISBN 0-87975-673-X. "Now you have five black gals who speak, act, and think like latter-day Amos and Andys." 
  4. ^ Miller-Young (2007). "Let Me Tell Ya 'bout Black Chicks". In Wright, Schuhmann. Blackness and Sexualities. p. 151. "These actresses of above-average acting abilities, speak with a stereotypical "black girl" cadence and affectation—lots of rhyming, 'Oh, Honeys!', 'Mmmm Hmmms!', and 'Giiiirls!,' and there is ample eye rolling, teeth sucking, and hands on the hips." 
  5. ^ "Antonio Passolini Chat at Adult DVD Talk". Adult DVD Talk. September 6, 2000. Retrieved 2008-05-31. 
  6. ^ Wilson, Midge; Kathy Russell (1996). "Sexual Tensions". Divided Sisters: Bridging the Gap Between Black Women and White Women. New York: Anchor Books. ISBN 0-385-47361-3. Retrieved 2008-05-31. 
  7. ^ Ford, Luke. "Gregory Dark". LukeFord.com. Archived from the original on 2008-01-25. Retrieved 2008-05-31. 

External links[edit]