Leslie Charleson

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Leslie Charleson

Charleson in 1967
Born(1945-02-22) February 22, 1945 (age 67)
Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.
OccupationActress
Years active1964–present
Spouse(s)Bill Demms (April 1, 1988–1991)
(divorced)
 
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Leslie Charleson

Charleson in 1967
Born(1945-02-22) February 22, 1945 (age 67)
Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.
OccupationActress
Years active1964–present
Spouse(s)Bill Demms (April 1, 1988–1991)
(divorced)

Leslie Charleson (born February 22, 1945) is an American actress. Charleson portrayed Dr. Monica Quartermaine on the ABC soap opera General Hospital.

Contents

Biography

Charleson was born in Kansas City, Missouri. Her career began on short-lived soap A Flame in the Wind in 1964. In 1967, she was an original cast member of Love is a Many Splendored Thing. She played Iris Donnelly Garrison and was a part of a highly popular love triangle [1] with David Birney and Donna Mills.


Charleson has worked in Prime time. In 1976, she appeared in the pilot for the Quinn Martin TV crime show Most Wanted, but neither she nor costar Tom Selleck were kept on for the series.[2]

In 1977, Fred Silverman, then head of President of ABC, asked her to join the serial General Hospital, which by that time was near the bottom of the ratings and near cancellation.[3] Charleson replaced Patsy Rahn as Monica Webber, a doctor caught between her husband Jeff Webber and his back-from-the-dead brother, her true love Rick Webber.[4]


In February 2007, she protested the firing of her on-screen husband Damon, telling the press that she was not happy with the decisions of the producers and that all the actors on the show over 40 were worried about their own fate.[5]

Roles

References

  1. ^ Schemering, Christopher (1987). The Soap Opera Encyclopedia. New York: Ballentine. pp. 150. ISBN 345-35344-7.
  2. ^ Etter, Jonathan. Quinn Martin, Producer. Jefferson: McFarland, 2003.
  3. ^ Schemering, Christopher (1987). The Soap Opera Encyclopedia. New York: Ballentine. pp. 117. ISBN 345-35344-7.
  4. ^ Schemering, Christopher (1987). The Soap Opera Encyclopedia. New York: Ballentine. pp. 117. ISBN 345-35344-7.
  5. ^ "General Hospital Heartbreak". Soap Opera Weekly. 2007-02-13. pp. 1–2.

External links