Leon G. Cooperman

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Leon G. Cooperman
Born(1943-04-25) April 25, 1943 (age 69)[1]
ResidenceShort Hills, New Jersey
CitizenshipUnited States
Alma materHunter College
Columbia University (M.B.A.)
OccupationFounder and Chairman/CEO of Omega Advisors
Known forStarted Goldman Sachs' asset management arm
Net worthIncrease US $ 1.8 billion (est.)
(2011)[1]
Board member ofAutomatic Data Processing
Spouse(s)Toby
Children2
 
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Leon G. Cooperman
Born(1943-04-25) April 25, 1943 (age 69)[1]
ResidenceShort Hills, New Jersey
CitizenshipUnited States
Alma materHunter College
Columbia University (M.B.A.)
OccupationFounder and Chairman/CEO of Omega Advisors
Known forStarted Goldman Sachs' asset management arm
Net worthIncrease US $ 1.8 billion (est.)
(2011)[1]
Board member ofAutomatic Data Processing
Spouse(s)Toby
Children2

Leon "Lee" G. Cooperman is an American businessman and philanthropist. He is the Chairman and CEO of Omega Advisors.[2]

Early life and career

Cooperman was born April 25, 1943 to Jewish parents in the South Bronx. His father worked as a plumber[1] He attended Hunter College. After graduating, Cooperman became a Xerox quality control engineer in 1965.[1] He then obtained an M.B.A. from Columbia Business School, graduating on January 31, 1967. The day after graduating, Cooperman joined Goldman Sachs in the company's asset management arm, conducting investment research.[3] He worked at Goldman Sachs for twenty five years, becoming a general partner and Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs Asset Management.[2] In 1991, Cooperman left the firm and founded Omega Advisors.

Cooperman serves on the board of directors for Automatic Data Processing (ADP).[2][4]

With his wife Toby he has two sons Wayne and Michael and three grandchildren.[5]

In November 2011 Cooperman gained attention for an open letter to U.S. President Barack Obama in which among other things charged the president with engaging in "class warfare".[6]

In 2012 he was included in the 50 Most Influential list of Bloomberg Markets Magazine.

Philanthropy

Cooperman and his wife Toby are signators of The Giving Pledge.[7]

Cooperman has a long history of supporting Columbia Business School. In 2011, he donated $25 million to support the expansion of the school's campus. In 2007, he created the Cooperman Scholarship Challenge, helping to create over 40 need based scholarships. In 2000, he established the Leon Cooperman Scholarship to support financial aid for need based students. In 1995, he endowed the Leon Cooperman Professorship of Finance and Economics.[8]

References