Leeson Street

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Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2

Leeson Street (Irish: Sráid Líosain) is a thoroughfare near central Dublin, Ireland.

Originally known as Suesey Street, it was renamed in 1728 after the Leesons, a family of local brewers, who branched into property development and subsequently became Earls of Milltown.

The street is divided into two parts by the Grand Canal: Lower Leeson Street is to the north of the canal, linking to St Stephen's Green, with Upper Leeson Street south of the canal.

The Ombudsman's main office is on the street.[1] It is also home to two secondary schools, the Institute of Education and Catholic University School.

The street has an active nightlife, with clubs such as Buck Whaleys and the Sugar Club, and Nostromo Private Party Venue. Several pubs, such as Kobra, Hartigan's and Hourican's pubs are also here. It is also home of the charities Dublin Rape Crisis Centre and Aware - which aims to beat depression.

In 1990, Caravaggio's lost masterpiece, The Taking of Christ, was recognized in the residence of the Jesuit Communication Centre on Lower Leeson Street. Broadcaster Gerry Ryan lived and was discovered dead on this street.[2]

Bagatelle, an Irish rock band in the 1970s, had a hit with a song called "Leeson Street Lady".

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Coordinates: 53°20′00″N 6°15′16″W / 53.3333333°N 6.25444°W / 53.3333333; -6.25444