Law of supply

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The law of supply is a fundamental principle of economic theory which states that, all else equal, an increase in price results in an increase in quantity supplied.[1] In other words, there is a direct relationship between price and quantity: quantities respond in the same direction as price changes. This means that producers are willing to offer more products for sale on the market at higher prices by increasing production as a way of increasing profits.[2]

In non-differentiable terms, the law of supply can be expressed as:

(p - p')(y-y')0,

where y is the amount that would be supplied at some price p, and y' is the amount that would be supplied at some other price p' . Thus for example if p > p' then y > y' .[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M. Green, J.: Principles of Microeconomics. Oxford University Press., pg 138. 1995.
  2. ^ Rittenberg, L. & Tregarthen, T.: Microeconomics
  3. ^ Mas-Colell, d., lucrezi, M. Green, J.: Principles of Microeconomics. Oxford University Press., pg 138. 1995.