Laurentian Bank of Canada

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Laurentian Bank of Canada
TypePublic
Traded asTSXLB
IndustryChartered Banks
Founded1846 - as Banque d'Épargne de la Cité et du District
Founder(s)Ignace Bourget
HeadquartersMontreal, Quebec, Canada
Number of locations157 bank branches
32 commercial banking centres
15 brokerage offices
Area servedQuebec, Ontario
Key peopleRejean Robitaille - President and CEO
L. Denis Desautels - Chair
Productspersonal and commercial banking products; brokerage
Servicesbanking and brokerage
Revenue$737.4 million (2010)
Net income$122.9 million (2010)
Owner(s)Laurentian Group Corporation
Employees3,289 (2008)[1]
ParentLaurentian Group Corporation
DivisionsLaurentian Bank, Laurentian Bank Securities
Websitewww.laurentianbank.com
 
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Laurentian Bank of Canada
TypePublic
Traded asTSXLB
IndustryChartered Banks
Founded1846 - as Banque d'Épargne de la Cité et du District
Founder(s)Ignace Bourget
HeadquartersMontreal, Quebec, Canada
Number of locations157 bank branches
32 commercial banking centres
15 brokerage offices
Area servedQuebec, Ontario
Key peopleRejean Robitaille - President and CEO
L. Denis Desautels - Chair
Productspersonal and commercial banking products; brokerage
Servicesbanking and brokerage
Revenue$737.4 million (2010)
Net income$122.9 million (2010)
Owner(s)Laurentian Group Corporation
Employees3,289 (2008)[1]
ParentLaurentian Group Corporation
DivisionsLaurentian Bank, Laurentian Bank Securities
Websitewww.laurentianbank.com

The Laurentian Bank of Canada (LBC) (French: Banque Laurentienne du Canada) is a Schedule I bank in the province of Quebec. (It also has one branch in Ottawa, Ontario). LBC's Institution Number (or bank number) is 039.

History[edit]

The run on the Montreal City and District Savings Bank. The Mayor addressing the crowd. Printed in 1872 in the Canadian Illustrated News.

LBC 's history began in 1846 with the founding of the Banque d'Épargne de la Cité et du District, or Montreal City and District Savings Bank, by Monseigneur Ignace Bourget and a group of 15 prominent people from Montreal. The bank’s 60 honorary directors included Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine, Louis-Joseph Papineau and Sir George-Étienne Cartier.

The institution was created to provide the working class with a means for saving. The bank accepted all deposits between one shilling and 500 pounds sterling, and at the end of its first fiscal year, the Montreal City and District Savings Bank managed over 500 active accounts and held total deposits of £29,350.

In 1972, it became the first chartered bank in Canada to link all its branches to a central computer. This connection enabled the bank to process savings account transactions, personal loan files and term deposits "on-line".

Legislative revisions in 1975 allowed the Bank to open a branch in Granby, Quebec, its first branch outside the Montreal region. In 1980, the Montreal City and District Savings Bank obtained the right to expand its operations throughout Canada. This expansion led to the institution listing its shares on the Toronto Stock Exchange three years later, and in 1987, the bank was renamed Laurentian Bank of Canada, following its acquisition by the Laurentian Group Corporation.

In 2001, two branches in Saskatchewan were sold to Canadian Western Bank.

In 2003, it sold most of its branches outside of Quebec to TD Bank Financial Group. This included 57 retail branches with a $2 billion loan portfolio and $1.9 billion in deposits. TD paid $112.5 million.[2]

In June 2009, it won a contract to operate bank machines in Montreal's metro system. It installed 44 new machines that were operated under other banners in addition to 26 already in place. The 70 machines covers 63 different metro stations.[3]

Mergers[edit]

Former Laurentian Bank branch located in the Gay Village, Montreal, in a historical building still engraved with the bank's pre-1987 name.

The bank merged with Eaton Trust Company (in 1988), purchased Standard Trust assets (1991), acquired La Financière Coopérants Prêts-Épargne Inc., and Guardian Trust Company in Ontario (1992), acquired General Trust Corporation in Ontario, and purchased some Société Nationale de Fiducie assets and the brokerage firm BLC Rousseau (1993).

In 1993, the Desjardins-Laurentian Financial Corporation became the new majority shareholder of Laurentian Bank of Canada, following the merging of the Laurentian Group Corporation with the Desjardins Group. The bank purchased the Manulife Bank of Canada’s banking service network and the assets of Prenor Trust Company of Canada in 1994.

In 1995, the Bank acquired 30 branches of the North American Trust Company.

In 1996, one of its subsidiaries acquired the parent corporation of Trust Prêt et Revenu du Canada. A few months later, the withdrawal of its main shareholder – Desjardins-Laurentian Financial Corporation – prompted the Laurentian Bank to become a Schedule I Bank under the Bank Act, on a par with all the other large Canadian banks.

Membership[edit]

LBC is a member of the Canadian Bankers Association (CBA) and registered member with the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation (CDIC), a federal agency insuring deposits at all of Canada's chartered banks. It is also a member of Interac.

Headquarters[edit]

The bank's headquarters are located at 1981 McGill College in Downtown Montreal, Canada.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]