Latin Grammy Award

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Latin Grammy Award
Latingrammylogo.JPG
Awarded forOutstanding achievements in the music industry, primarily for works recorded in either Spanish or Portuguese
CountryUnited States
Presented byLatin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
First awardedSeptember 13, 2000 (2000-09-13)
Official websiteWebsite
 
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Latin Grammy Award
Latingrammylogo.JPG
Awarded forOutstanding achievements in the music industry, primarily for works recorded in either Spanish or Portuguese
CountryUnited States
Presented byLatin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
First awardedSeptember 13, 2000 (2000-09-13)
Official websiteWebsite

A Latin Grammy Award is an award by The Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences to recognize outstanding achievement in the music industry. The Latin Grammy honors works produced anywhere around the world that were recorded in either Spanish or Portuguese and is awarded in the United States.[1] However, both awards have similar nominating and voting processes, in which the selections are decided by peers within the music industry.

The first annual Latin Grammys ceremony was held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on September 13, 2000. Broadcast by CBS, that first ceremony became the first primarily Spanish language primetime program carried on an English-language American television network. The 14th Annual Latin Grammy Awards will be held on November 21, 2013 at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas, Nevada.[2]

Currently the awards are broadcast in the United States by the television network Univision.[3]

History[edit]

The Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences was formed by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences in 1997. It was founded by Michael Greene and Producers & Songwriters Rudy Pérez & Mauricio Abaroa. Rudy Perez was the Grammy Florida chapter"s first President of the Board. In 2000, it was announced that the 1st Annual Latin Grammy Awards would take place at the Staples Center on September 13, 2000. On July 7, 2000, the nominations were announced in Miami, Florida, USA. The first telecast took place at the Staples Center and was broadcast. The following year's show was canceled due to the September 11, 2001 attacks, which was the same day the show was to take place.[4] In 2002, the academy elected its first independent Board of Trustees. In 2005, the broadcast was moved from CBS to Univision where the whole telecast was in Spanish.[5] Voting members live in various regions in the US and outside of the US in regions such as Latin America. To be eligible a recording must have been recorded in Spanish or Portuguese. The eligibility period is July 1 to June 30 for a respective awards ceremony. Recordings are first entered and then reviewed to determine the awards they are eligible for. Following that, nominating ballots are mailed to voting members of the academy. The votes are tabulated and the five recordings in each category with the most votes become the nominees. Final voting ballots are sent out to voting members and the winners are determined. Winners are later announced at the Latin Grammy Awards. The current President & CEO of the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences is Gabriel Abaroa,[6] who is related to Mauricio, one of the founders.

Altogether there are three events: the Life Achievement when renowned artists are honored for lifetime achievement; Person of the Year, when one artist is honored at a gala dinner, and Grammy itself, an award that brings together artists from all over Latin America and that today is broadcast live to 80 countries, including Brazil, by channel Univision (TNT in Brazil).[7]

Awards[edit]

Award categories[edit]

Alike from the Grammy Award there is a general field consisting of four genre-less award categories:

The rest of the fields are genre-specific.[8] Special non-competitive awards are also given out for more long-lasting contributions to the music industry.

The first telecast had 40 awards presented however the following year 38 awards were presented. The most recent telecast in 2010 had a total of 46 awards presented.[citation needed]

Awards by artists' country of origin[edit]

Country2000200120022003200420052006200720082009201020112012Total
 Mexico11128910913681211814131
 Brazil131088999911119109125
 Spain277595342344257
 Colombia4435157310325456
 Puerto Rico1322246669111255
 Argentina322223734596-47
 United States121444166235342
 Cuba435342412224440
 Dominican Republic31--1226--3-321
 Venezuela11-----31142215
 Panama---1---12111-7
 Peru--1--1-----215
 Uruguay----1--1----24
 Italy-----1-1-1---3
 Nicaragua---------2--13
 Canada----------2--2
 Chile--1-1--------2
 France----1--1-----2
 Guatemala-1----1-----13
 Ecuador---------1---1

Sources: [9]

Ceremony locations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Latin Recording Academy FAQ". Retrieved 2011-01-22. "Q: Which product can participate in the Latin GRAMMY? A: Any product that has been released in the eligibility period and which is recorded in Spanish or Portuguese." 
  2. ^ Latin GRAMMYs To Light Up Las Vegas
  3. ^ "Latin Grammys on Univision for another six years: Latin Recording Academy extends deal with network". June 26, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  4. ^ O'Toole, Caitlin (2001-09-11). "Emmys, Latin Grammys Canceled". People. Retrieved 2011-07-25. 
  5. ^ http://corporate.univision.com/corp/en/pr/MIAMI_31102005-0.html
  6. ^ The Latin Recording Academy® Promotes Gabriel Abaroa Jr. to President/CEO
  7. ^ Grammy Latino 2013 - You Must go!
  8. ^ Have You Listened to Hispanic Christian Music Lately? Andree Farias CCM Magazine 12 Jul 2005 – “Now the Latin GRAMMYs have a category for Hispanic Christian music, and so do the Latin Billboard awards.” Unlike the GRAMMYs (which ..."
  9. ^ Fulghum, Sherrill (2010-11-11). "2010 Latin Grammy Award Winners". allvoices.com. Retrieved 2011-07-25. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]