Ladue, Missouri

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Ladue
Suburb
City of Ladue, Missouri
Ladue is located in Missouri
Ladue
Ladue
Location within the state of Missouri
Coordinates: 38°38′13″N 90°22′54″W / 38.63694°N 90.38167°W / 38.63694; -90.38167Coordinates: 38°38′13″N 90°22′54″W / 38.63694°N 90.38167°W / 38.63694; -90.38167
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountySt. Louis
CitySt. Louis
Incorporated1936
Government
 • MayorNancy Spewak
Area[1]
 • Total8.55 sq mi (22.14 km2)
 • Land8.55 sq mi (22.14 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2]545 ft (166 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total8,521
 • Estimate (2012[4])8,542
 • Density996.6/sq mi (384.8/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CST (UTC-5)
ZIP codes63124
Area code(s)314
Websitehttp://www.cityofladue-mo.gov
 
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Ladue
Suburb
City of Ladue, Missouri
Ladue is located in Missouri
Ladue
Ladue
Location within the state of Missouri
Coordinates: 38°38′13″N 90°22′54″W / 38.63694°N 90.38167°W / 38.63694; -90.38167Coordinates: 38°38′13″N 90°22′54″W / 38.63694°N 90.38167°W / 38.63694; -90.38167
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountySt. Louis
CitySt. Louis
Incorporated1936
Government
 • MayorNancy Spewak
Area[1]
 • Total8.55 sq mi (22.14 km2)
 • Land8.55 sq mi (22.14 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2]545 ft (166 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total8,521
 • Estimate (2012[4])8,542
 • Density996.6/sq mi (384.8/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CST (UTC-5)
ZIP codes63124
Area code(s)314
Websitehttp://www.cityofladue-mo.gov

Ladue is the inner-ring suburb of St. Louis, located in central St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 8,521.

Ladue has the highest median household income of any city in Missouri with a population over 1,000, as well as one of the highest median incomes for any city in the United States[citation needed].

Geography[edit]

Ladue is located at 38°38′13″N 90°22′54″W / 38.63694°N 90.38167°W / 38.63694; -90.38167 (38.636889, -90.381722)[5].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.55 square miles (22.14 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.  ±%  
19403,981—    
19505,386+35.3%
19609,466+75.8%
197010,306+8.9%
19809,369−9.1%
19908,847−5.6%
20008,654−2.2%
20108,521−1.5%

[citation needed][citation needed]

The home ownership rate (owner-occupied housing units to total units) is 91.6%.[citation needed]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 8,521 people, 3,169 households, and 2,538 families residing in the city. The population density was 996.6 inhabitants per square mile (384.8 /km2). There were 3,377 housing units at an average density of 395.0 per square mile (152.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.1% White, 1.0% African American, 0.1% Native American, 3.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 3,169 households of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.6% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 19.9% were non-families. 18.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.06.

The median age in the city was 46.4 years. 27.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 16.1% were from 25 to 44; 33.7% were from 45 to 64; and 18.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.5% male and 51.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 8,645 people, 3,414 households, and 2,598 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,006.2 people per square mile (388.6/km²). There were 3,557 housing units at an average density of 414.0 per square mile (159.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.83% White, 0.88% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.49% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.78% of the population.

Ladue is Missouri's best educated city, proportionately, with 74.5% of adult residents (25 and older) holding an associate degree or higher, and 71.8% of adults possessing a baccalaureate degree or higher (2000 Census).[citation needed]

There were 3,414 households out of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.6% were married couples living together, 4.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.9% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.94.[citation needed]

In the city the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 16.9% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 22.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 91.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $141,720, and the median income for a family was $179,328. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $51,678 for females. The per capita income for the city was $89,623. About 1.4% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The Ladue School District serves all of Ladue and part of Frontenac, Olivette, and Creve Coeur. Ladue Horton Watkins High School is the only high school in the district and is located in Ladue.

Ladue is home to two of St. Louis' private high schools, the John Burroughs School and Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MICDS)

The Headquarters Branch of the St. Louis County Library is located in Ladue on Lindbergh Boulevard (US 67).[7][8]

History[edit]

The historical anecdotes contained in this section were derived from the 2011 book "Ladue Found", written by Charlene Bry, former editor and owner of "The Ladue News."[9][10][11]

Ladue began as a farming community St. Louis County suburb. After St. Louis City ejected St. Louis County in 1876, Ladue was known as ranges 4 and 5 of "Township 45," with Clayton being the political hub. Original Township 45 farming families included the Dennys, Dwyers, Conways, McCutcheons, McKnights (all Irish), Litzsinger, Schraders, Spoedes (all German), LaDues (French), Warsons, Lays, Barnes, Prices, and Watsons (all English). Once automobiles replaced horse and wagon as the primary mode of transportation, farmers in the area began selling portions of their land to city workers who wished to live outside of the urban setting. Three small villages (Village of LaDue, Village of Deer Creek, and the Village of McKnight) merged in 1936 to become what is now known as Ladue.[12] Ladue was named from Ladue Road, the main thoroughfare in the area that led from St. Louis City to wealthy entrepreneur Peter Albert LaDue's large property at the current intersection of Warson Rd. and Ladue Rd. (including St. Louis Country Club). Peter Albert LaDue was a French immigrant who fought in the Revolutionary War as a member of the 1st New York Regiment. After the war, he moved to St. Louis and later became a prominent attorney, alderman, and investor in the 1840s and 1850s.[13]

Controversies[edit]

In the early 1990s the city tried to force a woman to take down a yard sign stating "Say No to the War in the Persian Gulf, Call Congress Now" as it violated a city law. The ACLU sued arguing that the right to place the sign was protected by the 1st Amendment. The ensuing legal battle went to the United States Supreme Court which ruled, in City of Ladue v. Gilleo, that the right to place the sign was protected by the Constitution.[14]

In 1985 the City of Ladue won a case against E. Terrence Jones and Joan Kelly Horn, a couple who had lived together for four years and who each brought children from a previous relationship. Ladue officials had requested that they marry or leave their home. The Missouri Court of Appeals sided with the city, stating, "There is a governmental interest in marriage and in preserving the integrity of the biological or legal family." The ordinance stands as of 2009.[citation needed]

Notable Citizens[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ City-data.com
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Headquarters." St. Louis County Library. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  8. ^ "Ladue city, Missouri." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 18, 2009.
  9. ^ http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/columns/deb-peterson/charlene-bry-s-history-of-ladue-subject-of-a-history/article_c362453a-664e-11e0-bf89-001a4bcf6878.html
  10. ^ http://www.stlmag.com/St-Louis-Magazine/December-2011/Q-A-A-Conversation-With-Charlene-Bry-Ladues-First-Chronicler/
  11. ^ http://laduefound.blogspot.com/
  12. ^ Ladue Found"; Charlene Bry, Virginia Publishing Company, 2011
  13. ^ a b c d e "Ladue Found"; Charlene Bry, Virginia Publishing Company, 2011
  14. ^ http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/faclibrary/casesummary.aspx?case=Ladue_v_Gilleo
  15. ^ http://www.thepitchforkranch.com/
  16. ^ http://sseinc.com/about-sse/management-team/susan-s-elliott/
  17. ^ http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSob=c&GSlh=1&GRid=91711756&
  18. ^ http://stlouis-mo.gov/government/departments/planning/cultural-resources/city-landmarks/Mississippi-Valley-Trust-Building.cfm
  19. ^ http://www.heilmannpub.com/stlflying.html
  20. ^ http://www.cnac.org/bixby01.htm
  21. ^ http://www.hunterfan.com/
  22. ^ http://collections.mohistory.org/archive/ARC:A0714
  23. ^ http://www.mohistory.org/node/2368
  24. ^ http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/obituaries/john-pruellage-chairman-of-lewis-rice-fingersh-dies/article_5fcfabd0-9892-11e1-8ac3-001a4bcf6878.html