Krupuk

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Krupuk
Fried Krupuk Udang.JPG
krupuk udang, made from prawn
TypeSnack
Place of origin
Indonesia
Region or state
Southeast Asia, also widely available in the Netherlands
Creator(s)Traditional food
Serving temperature
Room temperature
Main ingredients
Deep fried dried starch and other ingredients, the most popular is prawn
VariationsDifferent variations according to ingredients
Cookbook:Krupuk  Krupuk
 
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For prawn-flavored krupuk, see Prawn cracker.
Krupuk
Fried Krupuk Udang.JPG
krupuk udang, made from prawn
TypeSnack
Place of origin
Indonesia
Region or state
Southeast Asia, also widely available in the Netherlands
Creator(s)Traditional food
Serving temperature
Room temperature
Main ingredients
Deep fried dried starch and other ingredients, the most popular is prawn
VariationsDifferent variations according to ingredients
Cookbook:Krupuk  Krupuk

Krupuk or kerupuk (Indonesian), keropok (Malaysian) or kroepoek (Dutch) are deep fried crackers made from starch and other ingredients that serve as flavouring. They are a popular snack in parts of Southeast Asia, but most closely associated with Indonesia[1] and Malaysia.

Etymology[edit]

In Indonesia, the term krupuk refers to the type of relatively large crackers, while the term kripik or keripik refers to smaller bite-size crackers; the counterpart of chips (or crisps) in western cuisine. For example potato chips are called kripik kentang in Indonesia. Both terms; krupuk and kripik sound like the breaking or crumbling of this crispy snack to denote its crispiness.

Usually krupuk is made from the dried paste from the mixture of starch with other ingredients, while kripik is usually made entirely from thinly sliced, sun-dried, and fried products without any mixture of starch.

Preparation and consumption[edit]

To achieve maximum crunchiness, most of this pre-packed raw krupuk must be sun-dried first before being deep fried at home. To cook krupuk, a wok and plenty of very hot cooking oil is needed. Raw krupuk is quite small, hard, and darker in color than cooked one.[2]

Krupuk and kripik can be consumed solely as a snack, or cracked and sprinkled on top of certain food as a complement to add crispy texture. Certain Indonesian dishes such as gado-gado, karedok, rujak, asinan, bubur ayam and certain kinds of soto were known to require certain type of krupuk for toppings.

Types[edit]

Krupuk gendar (brown rice cracker) and krupuk kampung or krupuk putih (cassava starch crackers) in vacuum tin cans
Variety of raw unfried krupuk sold at Indonesian traditional market, Bengkulu province

Indonesia has perhaps the largest variety of krupuk.[1] There are many variations on krupuk, many of which are made from starch with seafood (shrimp, fish, or squid), but occasionally with rice, fruits, nuts or vegetables; these variations are more usual in Southeast Asia.

Other similar crackers[edit]

These are similar crackers, however commonly not considered as krupuk.

Production centers[edit]

Sidoarjo in East Java, also Cirebon and Garut in West Java, are major producers of krupuk, and many recipes originate from there.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yohan Handoyo. "Christmas Crackers". Jakarta Java kini. Retrieved April 4, 2014. 
  2. ^ Indonesian Regional Food and Cookery: Prawn cracker
  3. ^ Krupuk Udang Finna

External links[edit]