Kinsey scale

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search
Kinsey scale of sexual responses, indicating degrees of sexual orientation

The Kinsey scale, also called the Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale,[1] attempts to describe a person's sexual experience or response at a given time. It uses a scale from 0, meaning exclusively heterosexual, to 6, meaning exclusively homosexual. In both the Male and Female volumes of the Kinsey Reports, an additional grade, listed as "X", was used to mean "no socio-sexual contacts or reactions"; in modern times, this represents asexuality.[2][3] The reports were first published in Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) by Alfred Kinsey, Wardell Pomeroy and others, and were also prominent in the complementary work Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953).[1]

Overview[edit]

Introducing the scale, Kinsey wrote:

Today, many sexologists see the Kinsey scale as relevant to sexual orientation but not comprehensive enough to cover all sexual identity issues. They suggest that sexual identity involves at least three different spectra, sexual orientation being only one of them (two others being biological sex and gender identity).[4]

There have been similar studies where the scale is from 0 to 10. In such studies, the person would be asked a question such as "If 0 is completely gay and 10 is completely hetero, what is your orientation number?".[5]

Table of the scale[edit]

The Kinsey scale ranges from 0, for those who would identify themselves as exclusively heterosexual with no experience with or desire for sexual activity with their same sex, to 6, for those who would identify themselves as exclusively homosexual with no experience with or desire for sexual activity with those of the opposite sex, and 1-5 for those who would identify themselves with varying levels of desire for sexual activity with either sex, including "incidental" or "occasional" desire for sexual activity with the same sex.[6]

RatingDescription
0Exclusively heterosexual
1Predominantly heterosexual, only incidentally homosexual
2Predominantly heterosexual, but more than incidentally homosexual
3Equally heterosexual and homosexual
4Predominantly homosexual, but more than incidentally heterosexual
5Predominantly homosexual, only incidentally heterosexual
6Exclusively homosexual
XNo socio-sexual contacts or reactions

Findings[edit]

Kinsey reports[edit]

Main article: Kinsey Reports

Alternate measures of sexual orientation[edit]

The Kinsey Scale does not address all possible sexual expressions. Others have stepped forward to define it further. In 1980, Michael Storms proposed a two dimensional chart with an X and Y axis.[11] This scale took into account the case of asexuality and the simultaneous expression of hetero-eroticism and homo-eroticism.[12] Fritz Klein, in his Klein Sexual Orientation Grid, included factors such as how orientation can change throughout a person's lifetime, as well as emotional and social orientation.[citation needed]

Kinsey, Storm, and Klein are only three of more than 200 scales to measure and describe sexual orientation.[13] For example, there are scales that rate homosexual behaviors from 1 to 14, and measures for gender, masculinity, femininity, and transsexualism.[14][15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Kinsey's Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale". The Kinsey Institute. Retrieved 8 September 2011. 
  2. ^ (Male volume, Table 141; Female volume, page 472)
  3. ^ Mary Zeiss Stange, Carol K. Oyster, Jane E. Sloan (2011). Encyclopedia of Women in Today's World. Sage Pubns. p. 158. ISBN 9781412976855. Retrieved December 17, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Sexual Orientation & Gender". Planned Parenthood. Retrieved 2012-09-06. 
  5. ^ Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity (2006) - Janbell L Caroll
  6. ^ "Kinsey Sexuality Rating Scale". The Kinsey Institute. Retrieved 2013-12-02. 
  7. ^ a b Kinsey, et al. 1948. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, Table 147, p. 651
  8. ^ Kinsey, et al. 1953. Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, Table 142, p. 499
  9. ^ Kinsey, et al. 1953. Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, p. 488
  10. ^ Kinsey, et al. 1953. Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, Table 142, p. 499, and p. 474
  11. ^ "Evaluation of Models of Sexual Orientation" (PDF). University of Wisconsin–La Crosse. Retrieved September 6, 2012. 
  12. ^ "Graph of Michael Storm Scale versus Kinsey Scale". Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Retrieved 2012-09-06. 
  13. ^ Clive M. Davis, William L. Yarber, Robert Bauserman, George Schreer, Sandra L. Davis (2000). Handbook of Sexuality-Related Measures. Sage. ISBN 978-1-4129-1336-2. 
  14. ^ "Kinsey's Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale". The Kinsey Institute. Retrieved September 6, 2012. 
  15. ^ Clive M. Davis, William L. Yarber, Robert Bauserman, George Schreer, Sandra L. Davis (2000). Handbook of Sexuality-Related Measures. Sage. p. 137. ISBN 978-1-4129-1336-2. 

External links[edit]